Past Events

Here is a list of all the past Speaker Series events, Brown Bag events, and non-CAS events:
for additional years, click here

  • [Non-CAS Event] Joseph Cirincione is president of Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation. He is the author of the new book Nuclear Nightmares: Securing the World Before It Is Too Late, Bomb Scare: The History and Future of Nuclear Weapons and Deadly Arsenals: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Threats. He is a member of Secretary of State John Kerry's International Security Advisory Board and the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Cirincione worked for nine years in the U.S. House of Representatives on the professional staff of the Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on Government Operations. He is the author of hundreds of articles on nuclear weapons issues, the producer of two DVDs, a frequent commentator in the media, and he appeared in the films, Countdown to Zero and Why We Fight. He previously served as Vice President for National Security and International Policy at the Center for American Progress and Director for Nonproliferation at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He has held positions at the Henry L. Stimson Center, the U.S. Information Agency and the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He teaches at the graduate School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

    5:30 p.m. - Networking / Hors D'ouevres / Book Selling

    6:00-7:30 p.m. - Talk and Q&A

    7:30 p.m. - Book Signing & Sales

    $29 for WorldDenver Members, $39 for non-members

    Please register here by Friday, July 11.

    For more information, please click here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Born in Calcutta (Kolkata), India, Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) was a vital force in the art, literature and music of his country.  He was a poet, novelist, playwright, composer, philosopher and painter.  He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913 and established Visva-Bharati University at Santiniketan, West Bengal, in 1921.  Tagore traveled extensively and visited more than thirty countries on five continents.  He was captivated with what he saw during his trips to the Americas, Asia and Europe, and began painting and drawing at age sixty.  He found inspiration from various sources, including Haida carvings from British Columbia and woodcuts by German artist Max Pechstein.  In her lecture, Sharmila Roy Pommot discusses Tagore's astonishing accomplishments as writer, musician and artist.

    Sharmila Roy Pommot grew up at Visva-Bharati, the university founded by Rabindranath Tagore, where she experienced his music, poetry, dance, dramas and philosophy as part of everyday life.  She received a degree in English from Calcutta University and one in graphic arts from Visva-Bharati.  She studied Tagore's songs and classical Indian music and went to Paris in 1975 on an art scholarship from the French government, and did her doctoral work at the Paris-Sorbonne University.  She has a beautifully evocative voice, and her singing has enriched the films of Satyajit Ray, Nacer Khemir and Peter Brooks.  She adapted and directed several of Tagore's dance dramas in French, wrote French subtitles for Satyajit Ray's films, participated in several documentaries, and published in Postif (a French cinema journal).  She teaches musicology at L'INALCO (Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales) at the Sorbonne and was a scholar in residence at Visva-Bharati from January through May 2014.

    This event is free for all. For reservations or more information, contact Dariya Bryant at 720-913-0040 or dbryant@denverartmuseum.org.

  • [Non-CAS Event] AID (the Association for India's Development) is a nationwide nonprofit organization that works to fund and support grassroots projects that tackle a wide number of concerns in India. These issues range from energy and water to human rights and women's empowerment. Our support of these projects goes beyond the surface fiscal level, however. Projects supported by AID are regularly audited, so that we can achieve the maximum amount of positive impact.

    The AID annual conference is this weekend (May, 24-25, 2014) on the CU campus.

    This event features many fascinating discussions, presentations, and interactive sessions. The theme of the conference this year is "Women's Empowerment," but the topics range from human rights to more effective ways to fund development. Most of the speakers are grass-root level workers from India who can talk about their first hand experience in these topics. The conference is free for CU students, faculty and associates, and it offers a unique opportunity for people interested in development, people's issues and India. Most of the sessions allow ample time for audience questions and interaction with panelists and speakers.

    Registration can be completed by following this link: http://conference.aidindia.org. This is only for logistics, and there will be no charges for attending the sessions/panels.

    The conference is Saturday May 24 and Sunday May 25, and goes from 9 am-7 pm. It will be held in the ATLAS building, with most of the main sessions in ATLAS 100. Participants are welcome to attend one or multiple sessions, or the whole day.

    Questions? Please email aid@colorado.edu for questions related to the Conference.

  • [Non-CAS Event] AID (the Association for India's Development) is a nationwide nonprofit organization that works to fund and support grassroots projects that tackle a wide number of concerns in India. These issues range from energy and water to human rights and women's empowerment. Our support of these projects goes beyond the surface fiscal level, however. Projects supported by AID are regularly audited, so that we can achieve the maximum amount of positive impact.

    The AID annual conference is this weekend (May, 24-25, 2014) on the CU campus.

    This event features many fascinating discussions, presentations, and interactive sessions. The theme of the conference this year is "Women's Empowerment," but the topics range from human rights to more effective ways to fund development. Most of the speakers are grass-root level workers from India who can talk about their first hand experience in these topics. The conference is free for CU students, faculty and associates, and it offers a unique opportunity for people interested in development, people's issues and India. Most of the sessions allow ample time for audience questions and interaction with panelists and speakers.

    Registration can be completed by following this link: http://conference.aidindia.org. This is only for logistics, and there will be no charges for attending the sessions/panels.

    The conference is Saturday May 24 and Sunday May 25, and goes from 9 am-7 pm. It will be held in the ATLAS building, with most of the main sessions in ATLAS 100. Participants are welcome to attend one or multiple sessions, or the whole day.

    Questions? Please email aid@colorado.edu for questions related to the Conference.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Louisa Lim, Beijing correspondent for NPR and the BBC, will discuss her new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited, on May 20 from 5:30-7:00 pm in Ben Cherrington Hall, Sie 150.

    Lim opened NPR's Shanghai bureau in February 2006, but she's reported for NPR from up Tibetan glaciers and down the shaft of a Shaanxi coalmine. She made a very rare reporting trip to North Korea, covered illegal abortions in Guangxi province, and worked on the major multimedia series on religion in China "New Believers: A Religious Revolution in China." Lim has been part of NPR teams with multiple awards, including the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award, a Peabody and two Edward R. Murrow awards, for their coverage of the Sichuan earthquake in 2008 and the Beijing Olympics. She's been honored in the Human Rights Press Awards, as well as winning prizes for her multimedia work.
    More information and registration can be found at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/forums

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Dana Lewis at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao directly at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [Non-CAS Event] In the world of Asian art history, the Himalayan nation of Bhutan is comparatively understudied and often misrepresented as a minor offshoot of its better known neighbors, Tibet, Nepal and India. This talk draws upon the research and experiences of Ariana Maki, associate curator of Asian art at the CU Art Museum, while studying Bhutanese art in situ since 2007, and seeks to demonstrate some of its unique stylistic characteristics as well as its uses in rituals and everyday life. In addition, we’ll explore how art objects are used to define and sustain identity in Bhutan at the local and national levels.

    Doors open at 11:30 a.m.

    Tickets for lecture only: free for Asian Art Association members, $7 for DAM members, $5 for teachers and students, $10 for other. Museum admission not necessary unless touring galleries; DAM members please check in.

    Sponsored by the Asian Art Association, a DAM support group.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This half-day conference will be held from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm in Sie 150 of Ben Cherrington Hall. We have lined up a group of top scholars from the US, UK, and China to present their research and engage in conversations. More information, including an agenda and discussant bios, can be found on the website at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/conferences.html.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This film screening features the work of CSU-Pueblo students who prepared short documentaries inspired by the Chairman Mao Archival Collection at the CSU-Pueblo library. The screening should last for approximately one hour.

    The archive is a collection of "Maomorabilia" accumulated by Dr. Bea Spade during her trips to China. This collection was donated to the CSU-Pueblo library in 2012.

    For more information, please contact Dr. Brigid Vance at brigid.vance@colostate-pueblo.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This is a workshop with Ming Franz. It will be May 2-4, from 10 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. The cost is $275 for AAA members, $300 for DAM members, and $325 for all others. There is also a $30 materials fee paid. No painting experience necessary. 

    Reservations required, and there is a $50 non-refundable fee.  For reservations and further details, please contact blittle@denverartmuseum.org or call 720-913-0040.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] Dennis McGilvray, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, will discuss his recent research in Sri Lanka. The century-old Muslim shrine at Daftar Jailani, located on the southern escarpment of the Kandyan Hills in central Sri Lanka, celebrates an annual flag-raising and kandoori (urs) festival in memory of the popular Sufi saint Abd al-Qadir Jilani (1077-1166 C.E., buried in Baghdad), who is believed to have meditated for twelve years in a cave overlooking the jungles below. Recently, the shrine has become the target of militant Sinhala Buddhist monks who wish to reclaim the site as an ancient 5th century BCE monastic center. In 2013 a successful campaign to assert Buddhist control over Jailani was waged by monks of an anti-Muslim organization called the Bodu Bala Sena (Buddhist Strength Force) supported by the current Sri Lankan Defense Minister and the Sri Lankan Archaeology Department. The most recent celebration of the Jailani festival in February 2014 reveals the extent to which Sinhala Buddhist ethno-nationalism and anti-Muslim activism is affecting this traditional site of Sri Lankan Sufi devotion.

     

  • [Non-CAS Event] Jongjoo Lee, Unification and Security Attaché at the Korean Embassy in D.C., will join Dean Hill and Professor Zhao, on April 29 from 5:00-6:30 pm in Ben Cherrington Hall, Sie 150 for a panel discussion on  “How to Handle the North Korean Crises: Perspectives from the ROK, US and China.”

    Panelists will address the North Korean situation and offer their perspectives and opinions on the role the Republic of Korea, the U.S. and China can play in the conflict.

    Jongjoo Lee is currently Unification and Security Attaché at the Korean Embassy in D.C. Dispatched from the Ministry of Unification (MOU), her major focus here is to engage with U.S. policy community regarding North Korea issues, sharing information and analysis with and seeking policy recommendation from the community.

    More information and registration can be found at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/forums.

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Ms. Dana Lewis at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao directly at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This exhibit will be on display from March 1 until April 27 at RedLine. Curated by Julie Segraves.

    Born in Beijing in 1980, Chen Man is young Chinese photographer known for her strong aesthetic eye and outstanding photography skills. Using computerized 3-D rendering techniques, Chen Man creates evocative images that feature women and document their place in contemporary Chinese society.

    Chen Man fuses her superb interpretation of the female form with an active artistic imagination as she mixes visual elements from China’s past with features of contemporary art and culture. Her work combines outstanding photography with innovative new-media skills, and the results are evocative, painterly images that reflect the continuing evolution of China’s youth society. A New Attitude will be Chen Man’s first solo exhibition in the United States.

    A New Attitude is part of the 2014 exhibition series titled She Crossed the Line, presented by RBC Wealth Management and RedLine. For more information, please click here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Timothy Weston, Associate Professor of History and the Associate Director of the Center for Asian Studies, will give a talk on his current research entitled "When the Reporter is the Story: Executing Journalists in Early Republican China."

    Professor Weston will be presenting a draft of a partial chapter from his book project on journalists, journalism, and representations of society’s voice in early Republican China.  This portion focuses on press discourse about the summary execution (by warlords) of two journalists, Shao Piaoping and Lin Baishui, in 1926.

    If you would like to read a draft of the paper prior to the seminar, please contact Mithi Mukherjee at Mithi.Mukherjee@Colorado.EDU.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Although long valued as the fifth of the five normative social relations in Confucian discourse, friendship in traditional China has only recently begun to be studied for its broader cultural significance in Chinese history. In her talk, Anna Shields, Associate Professor of Chinese at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, explores the impact of elite male friendship on the literary culture of the mid-Tang period (780s–820s), an era of great social and cultural change and the beginning of the epochal Tang-Song transition. Friendships with fellow literati provided mid-Tang men with social capital, intellectual stimulation, and sites for literary exchange. More profoundly, some of the most influential mid-Tang writers—men such as Han Yu, Bai Juyi, and Yuan Zhen—also saw friendship as bridging the public and private spheres: choosing friends and celebrating them in writing became an important way for literati to publicize their intellectual commitments and even their moral values. Drawing from her book “One Who Knows Me”: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid- Tang China (Harvard Asia Center, 2015), Shields focuses on images of the “body” of the friend in mid-Tang poems, letters, and funerary texts, in particular examining the use of metonymy in representations of absent friends. By invoking friends metonymically—through boxes of letters, gifts of poems, the remembered sound of a voice—mid- Tang writers were able to capture the intimacy and emotional weight of their friendships without conventional sentimentality. Through this and other innovative approaches to portraying friendship, mid-Tang writers forever broadened the scope of experiences appropriate to literary writing and brought private life into greater public view.

    Body of the Friend

    Map of Humanities

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Fulbright program is the U.S. government’s flagship program for international educational exchange, and CU-Boulder is a top producing campus for U.S. Student Fulbright grants. Come to an information meeting to learn how you can apply for a Fulbright grant to do overseas study/research or to be an English teaching assistant overseas. These grants are for U.S. citizens who will have at least a bachelor's degree at the time the grant starts and who won’t have completed a PhD by the Fulbright application deadline.  The CU-Boulder student deadline for applying for a 2015-2016 U.S. Student Fulbright Grant is Sept. 8, 2014.

    More information at http://www.colorado.edu/oie/finances-scholarships-and-fellowships/us-student-fulbright-opportunities, or by email: oie@colorado.edu.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] A panel discussion in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protest and June 4th crackdown. Featuring Chris Hammons (Anthropology), and Tim Oakes (Geography), Tim Weston (History).

    Tiananmen Retrospective

    Map of Humanities

     

  • [Non-CAS Event] Graduating next year? Got plans for the summer? Now is an excellent time to start your Peace Corps application. Learn more at the Peace Corps info. session on Tuesday, April 22, 6 - 7: 30 p.m. in Hellems 267.

    In addition to breaking down the application process and benefits of Peace Corps service, we'll have guest returned Peace Corps volunteer Therese Glowacki share her pictures and stories of service. Glowacki works at the Boulder County Parks and Open Space resource management office. She was an agroforestry Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal, worked as an environmental specialist for Peace Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C., and was the associate Peace Corps director for the Madagascar environmental program.

    We know you'll be hungry from studying for finals so there will be free pizza too. Learn more about Peace Corps' Earth Day activitiesEnvironmental programs, and Agriculture programs.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Laura Lane, President of Global Public Affairs at UPS, will be the Jackson/Ho China Forum speaker on Thursday, April 17, from 5:00-6:30 pm in room 290 of Anderson Academic Commons. She will discuss “The China-US Economic Relationship: Perspectives from Government and Business.”

    Prior to joining UPS, Laura was Managing Director and Head of International Government Affairs at CitiGroup and VP for Global Public Policy with Time Warner. In her government career, Ms. Lane was responsible for bilateral trade affairs with the Middle Eastern and Mediterranean countries at the United States Trade Representative (USTR). She also negotiated market access commitments on trade in services with China as part of its accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) and served as U.S. negotiator for the WTO Financial Services negotiations, which resulted in a first-ever global agreement in 1997.

    Please RSVP online at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/forums/lane.html no later than April 16.

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Ms. Dana Lewis at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao, the Director of CCUSC, directly at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] This Luncheon Series talk will be given by Ariana Maki, Associate Curator of Asian Art at CU-Boulder.

    How did Bhutanese Buddhist masters use art and imagery to support their claims to legitimacy?  In what ways did (and do) mural programs contribute to a viewer’s understanding of ritual practices, local and regional identities, and religious authority? Based on field research in Bhutan, this talk will briefly explore the iconographic programs of a few key sites in Bhutan, highlighting the ways in which paintings of particular practices, deities, and historical figures made clear and deliberate claims to power, lineage and legitimacy both within Himalayan Buddhist religious traditions and the larger socio-political context.

    CAS Luncheon Series Spring 2014

  • [Non-CAS Event] Sip authentic Persian tea as you enjoy Persian-influenced music, poetry, and presentations by students from the Persian language program at the Asian Languages and Civilizations Department.

    Persian Cultural Night

  • [Non-CAS Event] The history of art reflects the evolution of human consciousness. Prehistoric cave paintings and figurines show the consciousness of the people who were wishing to invoke power and certain qualities of nature in order to imbue themselves with such power and qualities. One can observe the similar invocation and the embodiment (imbuement) in the art/artifacts of Jomon (??) era (14,500BC to about 300BC) in Japan. The art of Jomon culture is filled with powerful imagination and fantasy, no less imaginative than its contemporary counterparts in the west. Well known teacher and artist Hikaru Hirata-Miyakawa will also share how this prehistoric Japanese culture has been influencing his art.

    This event is free for AAA members, $5 for teachers and students, and $10 for all others. Reservations are recommended. Please, click here for tickets.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Distinguished Speakers Board is excited to bring former U.S. Ambassador to China and former Governor of Utah, Jon Huntsman Jr, to campus on Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Mr. Huntsman will be speaking at Macky Auditorium; the event will start at 7:30pm, with doors to the venue opening at 6:45pm. The event will include a lecture from Mr. Huntsman titled, “China: Opportunities and Challenges,” which will be followed by a question and answer session with members of the audience.

    Jon Huntsman Jr’s breadth of experience in Asia makes him one of the most knowledgeable American politicians on the region. Huntsman’s public service career began as a White House staff assistant to President Ronald Reagan and has since included appointments as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Asia, U.S. Ambassador to Singapore and Deputy U.S. Trade Representative. As a U.S. Trade Ambassador, Huntsman negotiated dozens of free trade agreements, investment framework agreements, and other bi-lateral and multi-lateral trade agreements for the United States. Prior to serving as Ambassador to China, Huntsman was twice elected Governor of Utah, including in 2008 with a record percentage of the vote and a majority in all 29 counties. As Governor, Huntsman governed with his eye toward maintaining Utah’s unparalleled quality of life, increasing the state’s economic competitiveness, and maximizing funding to Utah’s public education system.

    Tickets for the event are $2.00 for CU-Boulder student with a valid student ID and $12.00. Student tickets can be purchased from DSB table on the first floor of the University Memorial Center, Monday through Friday between 10:00am and 3:00pm. Community tickets can be purchased here

    For more information about the event visit www.facebook.com/cudsb or www.cudsb.org.

    Jon Huntsman Comes to CU

  • [Non-CAS Event] The 24th annual CU International Festival is coming this weekend! Happening this Saturday, April 12th, from 4 pm to 10 pm in the UMC Glenn Miller Ballroom. This festival features dozens of exhibits, performances, music, and food samples from around the world. The event is free and open to the public, and is sponsored by a handful of CU organizations including the Cultural Events Board. 

    2014 International Festival

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The ALC Language Night features student performances from various Asian language courses at CU. There will be Asian food and festivals, languages, media and culture, dance and music, skits, and more. The featured languages are Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, Hindi-Urdu, Japanese, and Korean. The performances will be from 5:00 until 7:30 p.m. in Humanities 1B50, and there will be a reception at 7:30 p.m. in the Humanities first floor lobby.

    This event is free and open to the public. Everyone is welcome to attend!

    ALC Language Night

  • [CAS Speaker Series] It's one thing to learn to read with an alphabet that has 26 letters. It's something else to entirely master an alphabet with 2,600+ different letters, or "kanji." Once you master the basic principle of ideographic writing, anyone can start reading the kanji. This lecture explains the concept of ideogram and then moves rapidly through most important kanji used in both Chinese and Japanese writing. Mr. Reid guarantees that those who pay close attention will be able to read Japanese and Chinese by the end of the lesson.

    Mr. T.R. Reid served as President of the Japan America Society of Colorado from 2011-2013. He is a longtime correspondent for The Washington Post, former Chief of its Tokyo and London bureaus, and a commentator for National Public Radio. Mr. Reid is also the acclaimed author of Ski JapanThe United States of EuropeThe Chip, and Confucius Lives Next Door.

    Learn to Read Japanese

    Map of Hale

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Asia has been the site of some of the greatest human and natural catastrophes.  From the 2011 earthquake and nuclear meltdown in Japan, to the 1984 Union Carbide disaster in Bhopal, India, to the legacy of Soviet nuclear testing in Kazakhstan, to the ever-present risk of nuclear war in South Asia, Asian sites reveal much about the intersection of the political and the natural.   The Center for Asian Studies will host four presentations by  scholars on the risks, costs and effects of different types and contexts of disaster in a day-long symposium on April 4, 2014.  Please join us.

    1:00 p.m. "Radiation 'Adaptation': Emergent Subjectivities and Health Strategies Among Indigenous Kazakhs at Semipalatinsk," Magdalena Stawkowski, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado Boulder

    In this paper, I draw on sixteen months of field work to describe the legacies of the Soviet atomic testing project and its long-term disastrous effects on the inhabitants of the nuclear zone in Kazakhstan.  Focusing on the village of Koyan in the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site region, I examine local Indigenous Kazakh villager’s understandings of health, livelihood and suffering, specifically their emerging subjectivities and health strategies after forty years of Soviet nuclear testing. While rooted in the broader histories of the Kazakh steppe and subsequent decline of the Soviet state, the context for this discussion is a forty-year period of Cold War nuclear testing and then its programmatic and abrupt closure. Particularly, I elucidate how scientific authority about the biological effects of low-dose radiation exposure, coupled with Kazakhstan’s economic restructuring programs, led to the socio-economic marginalization of inhabitants living adjacent to the test site. Principally, I address how Kazakhstan’s current political-economic climate has fostered a specific post-socialist “mutant” subjectivity in the nuclear zone—one that has rural populations “embracing” radioactive pollution. Tragically, the people I came to know see their own survival as proof that they are biologically adapted to a radioactive ecosystem.

    1:40 p.m. "Recovery and Lessons Learned from Fukushima Dai-ichi," Jerry Peterson, Professor, Department of Physics, University of Colorado Boulder

    One of the many dire problems resulting from the March 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake was the loss of cooling water to three operating nuclear power reactors at TEPCO’s Fukushima Dai-ichi plant.  Without the cooling, residual radioactive heating began to melt some of the components within the containment vessel.  Radioactive material was released from these components, and some left the plant in the air, ground water, and sea water, with wide media coverage.  Although the reactor safety systems themselves worked as designed, the entire system was overwhelmed by the quake and tsunami.  This system, we now realize, included a wide range of regulatory, corporate, public information, and other social, economic and political ingredients.  This accident has been called “a new type of nuclear disaster found at the interface of both social and natural phenomena”.  With nuclear fission providing 11% of global electricity, we must learn how to prevent, plan for, and deal with future incidents, within a much wider range of responsibilities.

    2:20 p.m. "Catastrophic 'Experiments' and Corporeal Categories: Bhopal Gas Victims as 'Special' Citizens," Bridget Hanna, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

    The Bhopal Disaster – the 1984 gas leak from an American-owned chemical plant into a densely populated central Indian city – was paradigmatic event of the risk society. Not only was it a novel and unique catastrophe: it was also a massive, uncontrolled, and largely undocumented experiment, one conducted with neither a protocol nor a control, on a sleeping city. What unfolded initially as the accidental exposure of 500,000 people to an unknown combination of deadly gases, has become over time (for those who have survived) an ongoing struggle for cure in the face of an ill that experts have still not fully defined. Rather, extant notions of treatment, illness, and exposure have been retrofit to Bhopal with mixed results, in an ongoing attempt to respond to, or perhaps neutralize, the suffering of the victims. Today, debates over detoxification, chronicity, stigma, categorization, and even clinical trials, are continuing to play out over the bodies of the gas-affected. In this talk I describe the medical institutions and practices that have arisen to manage the relationship of the gas-exposed to their health, in order to expose how medical uncertainty and the creation of “special” categories has constrained both access to care, and hopes for healing.

    3;00 p.m. "Self-Assured Destruction: The Climate Impacts of Nuclear War," Brian Toon, Professor, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder

    Climatic Consequences and Agricultural Impact of Regional Nuclear Conflict - Brian Toon. A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, would inject smoke from the resulting fires into the stratosphere. This could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history and global-scale ozone depletion, with enhanced ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the surface. Simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), show a long stratospheric residence time for smoke and hence a long-lasting climate response, with global average surface air temperatures 1.1 K below normal and global average precipitation 4% below normal even after a decade. The erythemal dose from the enhanced UV radiation would greatly increase, in spite of enhanced absorption by the remaining smoke, with the UV index more than 3 units higher in the summer midlatitudes, even after a decade. Scenarios of changes in temperature, precipitation, and downward shortwave radiation applied to the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer crop model for winter wheat, rice, soybeans, and maize by perturbing observed time series with anomalies from the regional nuclear war simulations, produce decreases of 10-50% in yield averaged over a decade, with larger decreases in the first several years, over the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The impact of the nuclear war simulated here, using much less than 1% of the global nuclear arsenal, would be devastating to world agricultural production and trade, possibly sentencing a billion people now living marginal existences to starvation. The continued environmental threat of the use of even a small number of nuclear weapons must be considered in nuclear policy deliberations in Russia, the U.S., and the rest of the world.

    3:40 p.m. Break

    4:00 p.m. Discussion by a faculty panel of respondents

    Waleed Abdalati (Professor of Geography, CU-Boulder), Donna Goldstein (Professor of Anthropology, CU-Boulder), Laurel Rodd (Professor of Japanese, Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, CU-Boulder), and Emily Yeh (Professor of Geography, CU-Boulder); moderated by Tim Oakes (Director ofthe Center for Asian Studies and Professor of Geography, CU-Boulder)

    5:30 p.m. Reception

    The closest metered parking is along University Avenue and in Lot 381, which is at the end of University Avenue along the roundabout just before the road turns north down the hill. These are limited to two hours, however, so we suggest that you park in the Euclid Auto Park by the University Memorial Center.

    CAS Symposium 2014: Catastrophic Asia

    Map of Norlin

  • [Non-CAS Event] This event is part of the Curator's Circle Lecture Series. This event is free, but reservations are required. Contact Lea Norcross at lnorcross@denverartmuseum.org, or call 720-913-0040.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations is holding the 2nd Annual Boulder Chinese Contest on April 3. There will be a reception following the contest in the Humanities Lobby. The deadline to sign up to compete is March 14. For further information, please contact chun-ling.hsu@colorado.edu.

    2nd Annual Boulder Chinese Contest

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Dr. J. Kathleen Magilvy, Professor Emerita, University of Colorado College of Nursing, will provide insights on “The Growing Industry related to an Aging Population: quality of life and healthcare issues in Japan”.

    Dr. Magilvy recently retired after 39 years at the University of Colorado College of Nursing where she most recently held the position of Associate Dean for Academic Programs.  Her areas of expertise include community/public health nursing, gerontology, and qualitative research.  She earned her BSN degree in Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, her MS in Community Health Nursing at Northern Illinois University, and her PhD in Nursing from the University of Colorado. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing (FAAN).

    Professor Magilvy’s research is in community-based and long-term care for older adults and people with chronic illness and disability. She has conducted federally funded research on delivery and outcomes of rural and community health services and community analysis. An ethnographer, Professor Magilvy is interested in cross-cultural and international aging and health care. She consults internationally in these areas and in doctoral education and qualitative research. She has traveled frequently to Japan as a visiting professor and nurse scientist and enjoys learning about community health, aging, and Japanese culture. Dr. Magilvy has taught or consulted at universities such as Tokyo University, Tokyo Medical Dental University, Kobe City College of Nursing, St. Luke’s College of Nursing, Kyoto University, Oita Prefectural College of Nursing, and most recently served as a visiting professor at Yamagata Prefectural University of Nursing and Health Sciences. 

    America has much to learn from our colleagues in Japan as Japan has the fastest growing older population in the world with physical facilities that cannot keep up with the growing need for services.  We look forward to Dr. Magilvy’s insights and observations on this topic and hope that you can join us.

    The International Executive Roundtable will be held on Thursday, April 3, 2014 from 12:00 noon until 1:30 pm in the Executive MBA Auditorium, located at 1250 14th Street, Suite 150.  Box lunches will be provided.  This event is free, but please RSVP by Tuesday, April 1, 2014 to Melanie Ellison by calling 303-315-8884. 

    Co-sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and the Institute for International Business at the University of Colorado Denver.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] This event has been cancelled. This Luncheon Series talk will be given by Rachel Fleming, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology. As more Indian women enter workplaces in cities like Bangalore, especially in fields such as Information Technology, they are experiencing new dilemmas, lifestyles, and friendships that differ from previous generations. Based on several months of fieldwork in Bangalore and interviews with three generations of women, this talk presents conclusions about how women in this site understand and experience new work opportunities, gender interactions, attitudes about marriage, and changes in families, and how they come to rely on friends amidst rapid urban and social change in India.

    CAS Luncheon Series Spring 2014

  • [Non-CAS Event] This event is part of the Curator's Circle Lecture Series. This event is free, but reservations are required. Contact Lea Norcross at lnorcross@denverartmuseum.org, or call 720-913-0040.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] Wee Kiat Lim, PhD Candidate in the Department of Sociology, will discuss his field work on emergency management systems in China. Using a mixed-method approach that involves interviews, participant observation, and archival review, he traces the genesis of the Chinese emergency management organizational field created after the 2003 SARS outbreak. His five-month fieldwork in Beijing was conducted over the political leadership transition in late 2012.  His research identifies the provisional successes and failures that define the new field, especially ideas about risk and governance—indigenous and heavily adapted from afar—that have shaped China’s legal and policy landscape on natural disasters over the last decade. His findings inform the understudied area of ideational and expert influence on emerging organizational field formation in neoinstitutional theory, especially in a non-Western context.

    This event is part of the Catastrophic Asia series.

    CAS Luncheon Series Spring 2014

  • [Non-CAS Event] Please join the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations for Hindi Night on March 18th from 6:30-9:00pm in HUMN 1B50. Hindi Night is organized by faculty and students of the Hindi language at CU and includes student presentations and performances related to the study of Hindi and South Asia. Dinner will also be served.

    This event is free and open to the public.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Asian Women's movements in the United States are often forgotten or misunderstood, as shown by the heated discussions generated on Twitter by #NotYourAsianSidekick this year. Join Ruvini DeFonseka and Sandra No from the Womrn's Resource Center and Karen Shimomoto from SORCE as they discuss the histories of Asian Women's movements in the United States and where we stand today as a nation. Learn how we can all be better allies to Asian Women in activism and work towards creating a more inclusive feminist movement.

    For more information, please contact wrcprograms@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] "Healing" has lately become a vogue word in Korean popular culture. It has been employed in a variety of popular cultural products including talk shows, books, movies, pop music, and ads, to name a few. Although there are corresponding Korean words such as chi-ryo or chi-yu, "HEALING," an English word, itself is commonly and intentionally used in popular culture as well as in everyday language. The imported, or "re-coined," term appears to be believed to signify what cannot be precisely delivered through other native equivalents. What is the meaning(s) of the word "healing" to people in Korea who are situated in the current, late capitalist and neo-liberalist, context of the country? Why are they so much into the healing discourses in popular culture? What would be the "political" implication of the fast emerging healing culture for this highly materialistic society? This talk explores these questions by comparing the case in Korea with the "therapeutic culture" that has been observed and analyzed in the US setting.

    This talk features Jin Kyu Park, Associate Professor at the School of Communications and Media at Seoul Women's University and Visiting Research Fellow at the Center for Media, Religion, and Culture at the University of Colorado Boulder.

    Sponsored by the Center for Media, Religion, and Culture.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Please join us for an evening with a variety of community professionals from a diversity of careers and backgrounds. The evening will begin with an open forum question and answer panel with prominent professionals from the Boulder/Denver area who have careers in areas pertaining to law, business, non-profit management, academics and Jewish communal organizations, all of whom believe that degrees in Jewish Studies and the humanities are valuable in today's working world. 

    Our panel will feature:

    Erin Breeze, Co-Director, Building Bridges
    Katherine Schwartz, Director of Lifelong Learning at Congregation Har HaShem
    Kenneth Scott, JD, Former Senior Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the Founder of Rights and Consulting Investigation
    Professor Elias Sacks, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Jewish Studies
    Stuart Feinhor, District Advocate for Congressman Jared Polis

    Following the panel will be a networking event, providing CU students with the opportunity to meet with Program in Jewish Studies alumni, panelists, and other professionals working in an array of fields. 

    The best thing about a degree in Jewish Studies is its versatility post-graduation and its openness to students of all backgrounds. Come learn how this degree can be applied!

    RSVPs appreciated to CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu.

    Business Attire Required. Open to ALL Students of ALL Majors and Backgrounds.
     
    Questions? Please contact the Program in Jewish Studies at  CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu or 303.492.7143.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] This Luncheon Series talk will be presented by Jerry Peterson, Professor, Department of Physics and International Affairs.

    When The Republic of Kazakhstan became independent of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991, this vast land had very little connection with the rest of the world.  Today, the streets of Almaty, the principal city, are clogged with expensive imported cars.  Much of this prosperity has come from the exploitation of Kazakhstan’s vast natural resources, and a strong industry of processing these materials.  Kazakhstan ranks 11th in the world in oil reserves, and first in uranium.  The political system, a nominal democracy, has evolved more slowly, with the original Communist Party boss of the Kazakh SSR still serving as President.  Prosperity seems to have brought harmony, but Kazakhstan sits, largely empty, in an ‘interesting’ part of the world.  I will review things in Kazakhstan as I have seen them in my many visits over twenty years as a research collaborator, co-investigator for funded research, and instructor.

    CAS Luncheon Series Spring 2014

  • [Non-CAS Event] World Trade Center Denver is going to FULFILL your DREAM! We invite you to attend a fun and exciting full-day session by Rocky Mountain's Regional experts in international trade and business. All students get free entrance and free lunch. This is a collaborative student conference with Colorado Universities.

    9:00-9:30 International Trade Opportunities for Colorado

    9:30-10:30 Panel: Strategies for Expanding in Growing Markets

    10:45-11:30 Cultural Aspects of Chinese Business

    11:30-12:30 Keynote: Do's and Taboos of International Business

    1:00-2:00 Panel: Building an International Career

    2:15-3:00 International Marketing, Social Media, and Mobile Marketing

    3:10-4:00 Non-Corporate International Careers

  • [Non-CAS Event] This historical epic is set during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Akbar in sixteenth century india. Jodhaa Akbar portrays the relationship between the emperor and his Rajput Hindu wife, Jodhaa. Startting Hrithik Roshan and Aishwarya Rai.

    Hosted by the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations.

    Screening of Jodhaa Akbar

  • [Non-CAS Event] This is a day-long event that features special tours, a lecture, and a yoga class. 

    11:30 a.m. - Indian Folk Art Tour by Marty Corren (DAM Docent), Everyday Traditions Gallery, 5F

    12:00 p.m. - Lecture by Sarah Magnatta (University of Denver Professor), Lower-Level Lecture Room

    1:00 p.m. - Classical Indian Art Tour by Barbara Kelly (DAM Docent), India Gallery, 5F

    1:30 p.m. - Yoga class by Kristin Bonk Fong (Yoga Instructor), Schlessman Hall, 1F

    Cost for All Events: $10 AAA members, $20 all others

    Cost for Lecture Only: Free to AAA members, $5 teachers and students, $10 all others

    Reservations are required. For tickets, click here.  Please, contact blittle@denverartmuseum.org or call 720-913-0040 for further assistance.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Alison Klayman, documentary filmmaker, will come to CU to show her documentary, Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry. This event is in conjunction with the International Film Series.

    Award-winning filmmaker and journalist Alison Klayman is one of documentary film’s most exciting new talents. Her debut feature documentary, Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, won critical acclaim and several top honors, including a Special Jury Prize at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, and an Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia Award, the highest accolade of broadcast journalism. NEVER SORRY was released theatrically around the world and translated into over 25 languages. It was one of the highest grossing films last year directed by a woman, and earned Alison a Director’s Guild of America Award nomination. To find out more about Alison, please visit this page.

    Map of Muenzinger

  • [Non-CAS Event] Amazing speakers from around the world converge on the University of Colorado Boulder for one night! Meet activists Chen Guangcheng from China, Kasha Jacqueline from Uganda, Maryam al-Khawaja from Bahrain, and Park Sang Hak from North Korea.

    Park Sang Hak defected from North Korea in 1999 and is now a democracy activist. He is the chairman of Fighters for a Free North Korea, an organization that launches balloons containing human rights and pro-democracy literature into North Korea. He is also a member of the Democracy Network Against the North Korean Gulag and the Exile Committee for North Korean Democracy.

    Kasha N. Jacqueline, a Ugandan lesbian and LGBTI activist, is the founder of Freedom and Roam Uganda (FARUG), an organization that offers refuge to members of the LGBTI community. Jacqueline has described the situation presently occurring in her country as a movement that threatens anyone labeled as a homosexual with imprisonment, exile or death.

    Chen Guangcheng is a blind Chinese civil rights activist and self-taught legal worker.  After bringing a lawsuit against Chinese authorities for excessive enforcement of the country’s one-child policy, he was sentenced to house arrest.  In 2012, he escaped and fled to the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.  He now lives with his family in the U.S. and is a visiting scholar at the New York University School of Law.

    Maryam Al-Khawaja relates the stories of individuals who, in their desire for freedom, have been targeted by the Bahraini government as terrorists. Al-Khawaja is featured in the film, "We Are the Giant," which is part of the Sundance Film Festival.

    Doors open at 6:30, and there will be a gift bag giveaway. From 7:00 until 9:00, the speakers will give their talks and there will be a Q&A Session.

    Free and open to the public. For more information, visit this page.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] This talk will be presented by Eric Dinmore, Associate Professor of History at Hampden-Sydney College. In the years immediately following World War II, Japanese academic economists and public policy commentators viewed “backwardness” as a primary factor behind their country’s ruinous wartime pursuit of empire. In order to overcome “backwardness,” they argued Japanese would need to refashion their entire relationship with the natural environment, so as to maximize the amount of resources available to feed a growing economy. Many advocated “comprehensive development” (sōgō kaihatsu) as a unified management of the domestic landscape that employed long-term planning, empirical data analysis, and technocratic guidance in the name of the public good.  A key, if not the key, component in early postwar comprehensive development was the promotion of large, phenomenally expensive multi-purpose dams. Backers of multi-purpose dam projects in early postwar Japan justified their necessity for a number of reasons, including flood control, provision of water for irrigation and industry, improvement of river transport, promotion of rural development, and hydroelectricity. This last reason factored most importantly at a time when Japan suffered from chronic electricity shortages.

    In this talk, Dinmore examines early postwar comprehensive development and dam promotion on the levels of policy discourse and actual practice.  He traces the genealogy of the 1950 Law on Comprehensive National Land Development (Kokudo sōgō kaihatsu hō), the basic law that underpinned attempts to reconfigure Japanese landscapes during the 1950s and early 1960s. He then presents the case study of the Sakuma Dam, which at its completion in 1956 stood as Japan’s largest dam and as a concrete product of comprehensive development policy. The Sakuma Dam, he argues, illustrated the limitations of the comprehensive development approach by skewing the benefits of hydraulic exploitation toward urban industrial centers, by failing to encourage rural revitalization, and by upsetting the natural environment of the Tenryū River Valley in central Japan. 

    The closest metered parking is along University Avenue. Another option is the Euclid Auto Park by the University Memorial Center, which is a little more expensive but does not have a two-hour time limit.

    High Growth Hydrosphere

    Map of Hale

  • [CAS Speaker Series] This talk will be given by Eric Dinmore, Associate Professor of History at Hampden-Sydney College. He will recount how he assembled and curated online “personal collections” for Harvard’s Digital Archive of Japan’s 2011 Disasters, as well as reflect on the significance of his time with the project while a postdoctoral fellow at the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies from 2011 to 2012.

    The Great East Japan Earthquake and associated tsunami and nuclear catastrophes of March 11, 2011 shook Japan and the rest of the world with their human toll, devastating scale, and interlocking complexity.  “3-11” also was unprecedented as a natural and human disaster striking a nation in the forefront of the global economy in a newly digital age. It provoked a global barrage of online blog entries, discussion group postings, Twitter tweets, audio recordings, non-governmental and relief organization communications, photographs, videos, news articles, disaster-related government websites, and other digital documentation. To preserve, organize, and make as much of this record available as possible to scholars and the wider online public, the Reischauer Institute launched the Digital Archive of Japan’s 2011 Disasters project. From its inception in March 2011, the project has indexed and search-tagged thousands of websites and documents, and hundreds of thousands of tweets, photographs, and videos. With the aid of partner organizations inside and outside Japan, it has assured that these catalogued items are stored on servers for future users. 

    Much of Dinmore's work on the project involved using experimental interface software to assemble sample “personal collections” drawing from the catalogued digital records. In addition to serving as a repository, the Disasters Archive has strived to become a dynamic, ever-expanding public space. It and similar digital humanities projects are fundamentally social endeavors: not only do many digital records come from public websites, blogs, discussion forums, and social media sites; these items are also being made available to the global online public for perusal, curation, and commentary. Dinmore's task, then, was to present and curate digital narratives of “3-11” to the global online public, as well as to explain how he did it. As someone with no direct experience of the disasters and little previous exposure to the digital humanities, this undertaking revised the way he thought about “collecting” and forced him to grapple with knotty issues of addressing an ongoing tragedy from thousands of miles away. 

    The closest metered parking is along University Avenue. Another option is the Euclid Auto Park by the University Memorial Center, which is a little more expensive but does not have a two-hour time limit.

    3-11 Online

    Map of Hale

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The CU Asian Studies Graduate Student Association Conference is an annual event hosted by CU faculty and graduate students of the ALC department. The goal of the conference is to foster cross-cultural understanding of Asia through the presentation of graduate level research on a wide variety of Asia-related topics. These topics range from contemporary and ancient literature to politics, history, and art.

    This year's keynote speakers will be Professor William Boltz of the University of Washington and Professor Atsuko Ueda of Princeton University. Professor Boltz will give a lecture entitled "'Why no A-B-C?' What ever happened to the alphabet in East Asia?" on Friday, March 7 at 5:30 p.m. in Atlas 102. Professor Ueda will give a lecture entitled "Cultural Resentment and Valorization in Postwar Japanese Literary Criticism: Nakamura Mitsuo's 'Spirit of Criticism'" on Saturday, March 8 at 10:30 a.m. in Humanities 250.

    For a schedule of panels, please click here.

    This event is free and open to the public.

    CUBASGSA Conference 2014 Professor Boltz's Talk

    CUBASGSA Conference 2014 Professor Ueda's Lecture

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The CU Asian Studies Graduate Student Association Conference is an annual event hosted by CU faculty and graduate students of the ALC department. The goal of the conference is to foster cross-cultural understanding of Asia through the presentation of graduate level research on a wide variety of Asia-related topics. These topics range from contemporary and ancient literature to politics, history, and art.

    This year's keynote speakers will be Professor William Boltz of the University of Washington and Professor Atsuko Ueda of Princeton University. Professor Boltz will give a lecture entitled "'Why no A-B-C?' What ever happened to the alphabet in East Asia?" on Friday, March 7 at 5:30 p.m. in Atlas 102. Professor Ueda will give a lecture entitled "Cultural Resentment and Valorization in Postwar Japanese Literary Criticism: Nakamura Mitsuo's 'Spirit of Criticism'" on Saturday, March 8 at 10:30 a.m. in Humanities 250.

    For a schedule of panels, please click here.

    This event is free and open to the public.

    CUBASGSA Conference 2014 Professor Boltz's Talk

    CUBASGSA Conference 2014 Professor Ueda's Lecture

  • [Non-CAS Event] This lecture will be given by Dr. Nader Hashemi, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Denver.

    The interim nuclear deal between Iran and the West in Geneva last November has generated optimism that a final agreement can be secured in 2014. Policymakers and analysts are debating the consequences of an emerging thaw in US-Iran relations. What do these developments portend for the future? Are formal diplomatic relations and cooperation between the US and Iran inevitable? will a final nuclear agreement translate into a more stable Middle East and greater security for Israel, or the converse/ How does the nuclear deal affect the internal struggle for democracy and human rights in Iran? This lecture will explore these questions by providing an assessment of Iranian politics since the election of President Hassan Rouhani.

    Sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations.

    Is Hassan Rouhani and Iranian Gorbechev?

     

  • [Non-CAS Event] ISSS is hosting another brown bag on international students next week! "Nodding Yes, Nodding No" will be about understanding Indian international students at CU. All are welcome, and staff and faculty are highly encouraged to attend! Happening Wednesday, March 5 from 12 pm - 1 pm in the C4C Abrams Lounge. Bring your lunch and your questions, and be prepared for a brief presentation followed by fun panel and small-group conversations with Indian students!

    For more information, please email adviser@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This talk will feature Larry Diamond. Larry Diamond is Director of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford, and Faculty Co-Director of the Haas Center for Public Service. He is also a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and founding coeditor of the Journal of Democracy. His book The Spirit of Democracy: The Struggle to Build Free Societies Throughout the World explores the sources of global democratic progress and stress and the future prospects of democracy. Read more about Larry Diamond here.

    This event is being held by WorldDenver. It is $25 for Member of WorldDenver, Denver Eclectics and Stanford Alumni. It is $35 for Non-Members, and $20 for WorldDenver Young Professionals. To find out more about the event and to register, please visit this page.

  • [Non-CAS Event] PhD Candidate Adam Williams in the Department of Geography will present a talk entitled "Excess and Access: Unraveling the Margins of Informal Recycling in Shanghai" as part of the Geography Colloquium Series.

    Excess and Access

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Jackson/Ho workshop, "Internationalization of China's State-Owned Enterprises: Perspectives from China," will be held on February 28 from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. Chinese scholars from Beijing International Studies University, Xi’an University of Technology, Central University of Finance and Economics, South China Normal University, Hubei University, Northwest University will present their research papers on two panels.

    Panel one: "Assessments of Internationalization of Chinese Enterprises"
    Panel two: "China's Enterprises in the International Division of Labor"

    Discussants from U.S. and Canada universities will respond and make comments on their papers. Visit the website to register and learn more about this free event, as well as get the draft agenda and speaker bios: www.du.edu/korbel/china/conferences

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Ms. Dana Lewis at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The Center for Asian Studies invites you to learn about global career opportunities with a panel of experts in Asia-related fields. Panelists include Sam Goodman, founder and COO of Colorado House International; Kim Kreutzer, Associate Director of the Office of International Education at the University of Colorado Boulder; and Jeff Wang, President of Poetica LLC. Learn from these current professionals and get advice on how to use your education in a promising global career. A networking reception will follow. All majors welcome.

    Sam Goodman is the founder and COO of Colorado House International (CoHo), a company that has been designing, implementing, and managing study abroad programs for university students visiting from Asia since 2007. Recent programs have included collaborations with University of Colorado Anshutz Medical Campus, Unreasonable Institute, Yamagata University, and Colorado Heights University. Prior to establishing CoHo, he lived in Japan working for the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program (JET), a program backed by the Japanese Ministry of Education, and devoted to cultural exchange and international ambassadorship. He also served as the English educator for various large bans and oil and gas conglomerates while in Tokyo and Singapore. He graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder with a degree in psychology, and currently lives near Boulder where he finds himself securely nestled against the Rockies and being raised by his wife and 3-year-old daughter.

    Kim Kreutzer received a B.A. in Oriental Studies (with a concentration on Japan) and Anthropology from the University of Arizona and an M.A. in Anthropology also from the University of Arizona. She is currently the Associate Director of the Office of International Education at the University of Colorado Boulder and has been working at CU-Boulder since 1987. From 1988 to 2007, she worked in the study abroad section of the Office of International Education, running study abroad programs and selecting and preparing CU students for these programs.  Since 2007, the focus of Kim’s work has shifted to working on campus internationalization.  She advises CU Fulbright grant applicants, assists faculty in developing partnerships with overseas institutions, and works on initiatives to make the campus more international.  Kim studied at Kobe College in Nishinomiya for one year as a junior in high school and has been involved, in one way or another, with Japan ever since.  For example, in 2010, she received a Fulbright grant and participated in Fulbright Japan’s International Education Administrators' program in Japan.

    Jeff Wang is the president of Poetica LLC, a business development firm focusing on market research, market entry, and business relationship management for business enterprises and educational institutes in U.S. and China, while working with Chinese investors in selecting emerging technologies and products for commercialization and further growth. Jeff has over 19 years’ experience in academic research, technology development, and business management. He worked at information technology companies ranging from IBM to startups. He started from the technical side as a developer, technical lead, and then architect of enterprise applications, and moved into management, and then business. As Director of Operations at Click Commerce and Merge Healthcare, he was responsible for P&L, and oversaw business development (in markets such as U.S., Canada, Germany, U.K., Italy, Australia, Japan, and China), product management, channel management, intellectual property management, professional services, vendor relationship (including offshore outsourcing in India and China), and engineering management. He is an adjunct professor at Colorado State University’s College of Business, and a member of Executive Advisory Board of the CSU Denver Executive MBA Program. He is a member of the Advisory Board of Colorado China Council. He is also on the Editorial Board of “China Dealmaker”. Jeff received a B.S. in Mathematics from Peking (Beijing) University, China, a Ph.D. in Mathematics from University of Rochester, and an MBA from Colorado State University. He is a member of international honor society Beta Gamma Sigma. He published research papers in a world-class journal, and is a co-inventor of four issued U.S. patents.

    Career Tracks in Asian Studies Spring 2014

    Map of Humanities

    Map of Humanities

  • [Non-CAS Event] Come learn about Japanese culture and language through Japanese traditional dance and traditional folk songs. The interactive workshop is led by Mami Itasaka, director of the CU Japanese Ensemble, and Jay Keister, Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at CU.

    This workshop is free and open to all students taking Japanese or Japan-related courses as well as any interested CU students.

    For more information, please contact michiko.kaneyasu@colorado.edu.

    Japanese Dance & Song Workshop

  • [Non-CAS Event] TAO fuses the explosive power of Taiko drumming with fiery athleticism and color into a thrilling modern interpretation of this ancient art form, performed by men and women who have trained for years in the mountains of Japan. For more information about this performance, please visit drum-tao.com.

    This performance is part of the College of Music's Artist Series. Tickets start at $14. For more information, please visit cupresents.org.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Professor Richa Nagar’s work focuses on the politics and practices of knowledge production in an interconnected world marked by deep inequalities and violence.  Her work engages questions of epistemology and ethics, praxis and solidarity, to explore how alliances for sociopolitical justice are created and maintained.  She has previously developed this work through her contribution to Playing with Fire, a collaboratively produced book created by the Sangtin Writers Collective in Sitapur, India. Her keynote will draw from her forthcoming book, Muddying the Waters: Co-authoring Feminisms across Scholarship and Activism. That book builds on her ongoing work in Sitapur  by placing it in conversation with related struggles in sites as diverse as university classrooms in the US and the streets of the Tanzanian capital of Dar es Salaam. Throughout, she considers the labor and politics of translation across multiple borders that are often difficult to cross, exploring the prospects for collective action in terms of radical vulnerability. Resisting the romance of border-crossing, Nagar offers an embodied account of how these efforts succeed and fail with far-reaching implications for feminist praxis. 

    Muddying the Waters

    Map of Atlas

  • [Non-CAS Event]

    The Japan America Society of Colorado is sponsoring a lunch and lecture by Professor Edward J. Lincoln of Columbia University about the success (or not) of Prime Minister Abe's economic policies and initiatives. The cost is $15 for JASAC members and $25 for non-JASAC member. Box lunches will be served.

    For details and to register, please visit http://www.jascolorado.org/ai1ec_event/is-abenomics-working/?instance_id=2034.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] This Luncheon Series talk will be given by Professor Bella Mody of the Journalism and Mass Communication Program at CU.

    While profits have been declining in newspapers in North America and Europe, India and China are two countries where newspapers are still growing in circulation, advertising and profits. Given that there is no alternative to news media for voter education in democracies, and the multi-ethnic complexion of the Indian polity, this presentation will compare coverage  by newspapers targeted at distinct linguistic markets, voters who live in different regions of the country. Representations of the  ongoing Maoist insurgency (called  India’s “greatest internal security threat” by the government) will be compared to investigate differences in the comprehensiveness of citizen education. Concerns will be raised about the contribution of news media to this unique young 66-year old democracy straining at its regional-linguistic seams.

    Professor Bella Mody is the James E. deCastro Chair in Global Media in the Journalism and Mass Communication program at the University of Colorado in Boulder. Mody  specializes in the political economy of media in developing countries and in design research on public service applications of communication. “The Geopolitics of Representation in Foreign News: Explaining Darfur Sudan” (Lexington Press, Rowman and Littlefield, 2010) that won the Best Book of the year award from the Global Communication and Social Change Division of the International Communication Association  showcases the collaboration of eighteen students, staff and professors. http://www.colorado.edu/journalism/globalmedia/DarfurBook.html#Award

    Mody has worked with UN agencies, national governments and humanitarian organizations on media applications for agriculture, health and education in her native India, and in Malaysia, Singapore, Nepal, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Barbados, Ghana, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Kenya and South Africa.

    CAS Luncheon Series Spring 2014

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Monterey Institute of International Studies will be hosting an informal info session for students about International Careers and the Monterey Institute on the Boulder campus on Wednesday, February 19th from 5:00-6:30 pm in University Club 6. The Monterey Institute is a small, private graduate school of Middlebury College located in Monterey, CA. We provide international professional education in areas of critical importance such as translation and interpretation, language teaching, international education management, international policy, human security and development, international business management, and sustainable development. These several degree programs could be a good fit for your students in the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, and each year we receive many applications from elite students on your campus.

    Monterey Institute Info Session

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Nepalese Student Association and the Cultural Events Board proudly present Nepal Night 2014. This event will feature the famous Nepali pop singer "Raju Lama." Entry is free, and Nepali food will be served for free.

     

  • [Non-CAS Event] Before American Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas outed himself as an undocumented immigrant in The New York Times, he began making this film to record what he was about to go through. Vargas has been living in the U.S. illegally since he was brought from the Philippines at age 12 to live with his grandparents in California, where teachers and school administrators helped him gain college admission, a driver's license and employment. He later landed a job at The Washington Post. For the film, Vargas sent a camera back to the Philippines to interview his mother, whom he hasn't seen in 20 years because he can't leave the U.S. In this gripping, emotional film, Vargas tells his story and the stories of some of the millions brought to the country illegally as children who would benefit from a path to permanent residency under the stalled Dream Act.

    There will be two separate viewings of this movie.  The first will be at 12 noon, on Sunday, February 16, at Boulder High School at 1604 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, CO.  The second will be 5 pm on Sunday, February 16, at eTown Hall at 1535 Spruce Street, Boulder, CO.

    Here is a trailer for the movie: http://www.defineamerican.com/documented.

    Here is the website for the film festival: http://www.biff1.com.  It is advisable to purchase your tickets online as soon as possible, as many of the movies do sell out and tickets may not be available on the day of the movie.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Mile High chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League, in collaboration with History Colorado and the University of Denver, will host the annual Day of Remembrance at the History Colorado Center on Sunday, February 16, from 1-3 PM. This event commemorates the signing of Executive Order 9066 that authorized the forced removal and incarceration of over 110,000 Japanese Americans during World War II.

    Our program this year will feature Professor Patty Limerick, head of the Center for the American West at the University of Colorado, and author of Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West. Professor Limerick will talk about the Japanese American experience in the context of the cultural and political development of the Western states, and then moderate a conversation with a panel of survivors who will share their personal stories. The audience will be invited to participate. (Please note that the program is still being developed and is subject to change.)

    Come hear Professor Limerick and engage with the survivors, our honored guests; enjoy a taiko drum performance, and partake of sushi and other Japanese refreshments. Most importantly, come learn about a piece of modern American history that is often left out of middle and high school curricula.

    This event is free and open to the public.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Emily Yeh, author of Taming Tibet: Landscape Transformation and the Gift of Chinese Development (Cornell, 2013), will offer a short reading and Q&A session about this recently published book.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Jongku Kim is an internationally recognized Korean sculptor and painter who transformed the traditions of time-honored Asian antecedents in sculpture, calligraphy, painting, and poetry. He will demonstrate his approach by painting four large pieces on canvas in the VAC lobby during his visit and by creating a performance art piece in the VAC performance studio.

    Jonku's "...painting or words with steel filings can be compared with the calligraphy of pictographs in oriental culture; the harmony among poetry, calligraphy, and painting is very important. Poetry and calligraphy contain meanings while painting holds shape. Painting also explains poetry and calligraphy, and vice versa. Meaning and image coexist in literary artist painting. I think if we interpret [Jongku's] works of art based on this oriental art theory, we can easily analyze similarity and difference between two parts. While oriental painting uses Chinese ink, [Jongku] appropriates steel to draw the calligraphic text." (exculptor, 140).

    The CU-Boulder Department of Art and Art History Visiting Artist Program and the University Libraries are collaborating to bring Jongku Kim from Korea. They will also present a panel discussion, which will begin with the realm of contemporary Asian art, deconstruct the performance art piece that Jongku will create prior to the panel, and look to the future by examining the challenges inherent in documenting and 'preserving' ephemeral performance art.

    Alexander Watkins, CU's Art & Art History Librarian, will address the "projection of ephemeral art for subsequent analysis via documentation. He will be joined by William Morrow, who is the Denver Art Museum Polly and Mark Addison Associate Curator of Contemporary Art. He will initiate a conversation on some of those interpretations by exploring Jonku Kim's practice and its relationship to historical and current movements in contemporary art. In addition, Jongku will sit on the panel to discuss the performance piece. The event will be videotaped by Libraries media staff and be added to the Libraries website.

    Schedule of Events:

    Tuesday, February 11, 6:15 p.m. - Performance Art, VAC1B20

    Thursday, February 13, 7:00 p.m. - Lecture at Denver Art Museum, Free, Reservations Required (lnorcross@denverartmuseum.org, 720-913-0040)

    Friday, February 14, 5:30 p.m. - Reception, Macky

    Materiality of Transmutation

  • [Non-CAS Event] Ambassador David Shinn will describe the magnitude of the current China-Africa relationship, which includes 54 nations in Africa.  His remarks will emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of Sino-African interaction.  Finally, he will relate this important relationship to the interests of other countries, especially the United States.

    David Shinn has been teaching as an adjunct professor in the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University since 2001.  He previously served for 37 years in the U.S. Foreign Service with assignments at embassies in Lebanon, Kenya, Tanzania, Mauritania, Cameroon, Sudan and as ambassador to Burkina Faso and Ethiopia. He lectures around the world on the Horn of Africa and China-Africa relations.  He is the co-author of the Historical Dictionary of Ethiopia (2013) and China and Africa: A Century of Engagement (2012) and is working on a book concerning the Gülen Movement or Hizmet in Africa.  He serves on the board or advises several non-governmental organizations.  He has a PhD in political science from George Washington University.  Ambassador Shinn blogs here.

    $20 Members
    $30 Non-Members
    $15 Young Professionals


    Learn more and REGISTER HERE. This event is co-sponsored by Denver Sister Cities International .

  • [Non-CAS Event] The 2014 Distinguished Lecture in Cultural Anthropology will be given by Professor Lisa Rofel of the Department of Anthropology at University of California Santa Cruz.

    How do people think about social inequality, hierarchy and class in China today? Or more precisely, how do people justify social inequality in China today? To what extent and in what ways do they justify the enormous gap between the wealthy and the poor that has arisen after the end of Maoist socialism? And how do people in China today become affectively engaged in these recent, striking transformations?

    In Anthropology, we have long paid attention to what the discipline calls “origin stories.” This talk offers some origin stories told by people engaged in transnational commodity chains in the fashion industry between Italy and China, which my collaborator Sylvia Yanagisako and I call the twenty-first century silk road.

    For more information about this event, please contact Carla Jones at carla.jones@colorado.edu.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Robert A. Kapp 柯白博士 is president of Robert A. Kapp & Associates, 柯氏策略咨询公司 Inc., Port Townsend, Washington, USA. The firm provides consulting services to companies and nonprofit organizations seeking to develop successful activities with China or to engage with policy makers in the field of U.S.-China relations. 

    Dr. Kapp is Strategic Advisor 战略顾问 to the U.S.-China Specialty Group at Burson-Marsteller 博雅公共关系有限公司, (www.bm.com) the prominent global public and government relations firm, and Senior China Advisor 高级中国事物顾问 to the well known international law firm Kirkpatrick & Lockhart Preston Gates Ellis LLP高盖茨律师事务所 (“K&L Gates”) (www.klgates.com).  Both firms maintain extensive practices in the United States and China, and serve clients throughout Asia, North America, Europe, and elsewhere.

    From April, 1994 to November, 2004, Dr. Kapp served as president of The US-China Business Council 美中贸易全国委员会, 会长 the principal organization of American companies engaged in trade and investment with China. In addition to guiding the business services, publications, and program activities of the US-China Business Council from its offices in Washington, Beijing and Shanghai, Dr. Kapp regularly represented the American business community engaged with China, in both Washington and Beijing. He contributed regularly to informed U.S. dialogue on China, through Congressional testimony, published articles, frequent media appearances, and presentations to educational and community organizations nationwide. He has been widely recognized in the United States and China as a leader in the effort to sustain strong, mutually respectful relations between the two nations. 

    In the non-profit sector, Dr. Kapp chairs the China Committee of the Pacific Council on International Policy (www.pacificcouncil.org). He also serves on a number of Advisory Boards of organizations deeply involved in contemporary Chinese affairs and U.S.-China relations, including The U.S.-China Education Trust (www.uscet.org) and The China Economic Quarterly. He is an Advisor to LinkAsia, a program of LinkTV (www.linktv.org) . 

    In the field of corporate social responsibility; Dr. Kapp was the principal initiator of The US-China Legal Cooperation Fund (美中法律合作基金), which provided more than a million dollars in support of a wide range of Sino-American cooperative legal initiatives between 1998 and 2012.

    Dr. Kapp regularly publishes feature articles (in Chinese translation) in the respected weekly China Newsweek (中国新闻周刊) (http://newsweek.inewsweek.cn/). He is a listed Contributor to ChinaFile, The Asia Society’s innovative e-magazine (www.chinafile.com). Among other writings, he has recently published an article on the politics of US-China relations in Limes, the Italian geopolitical journal, and an essay on US-China intellectual property issues in U.S.-China 2022: Economic Relations in the Next 10 Years, published by the China-United States Exchange Foundation. An article by Dr. Kapp on U.S.-China relations, appeared, in Chinese, in the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences journal World Economy and Politics 世界经济与政治, (2009, no. 11). A recent interview with the 20th Century Business Herald (in Chinese) with Dr. Kapp is available at: http://zhuanti.21cbh.com/2012_jingyingfangtan01/. Dr. Kapp appears frequently in the media, and at major conferences in the US and China. Recent or forthcoming hosts include The Carter Center (Atlanta); Bloomberg Link; the National Association of Corporate Directors; Renmin University of China; the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences; the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences; the United States Air Force Academy; and others.

    Dr. Kapp received his doctorate in modern Chinese history from Yale University. From 1970 to 1980 he taught Chinese history at Rice University (Houston) and the University of Washington (Seattle). He is the author of a scholarly monograph and other published academic research on 20th-century China. From 1986 to 1991, Dr. Kapp was Lecturer at the University of Washington School of Business Administration, where he received a Distinguished Teaching award. He was Editor of the scholarly publication The Journal of Asian Studies, 1978-80. Communicating With China (1980), which he edited, was a pioneering contribution to effective popular communication between the United States and China. 

    From 1979 to 1987, Dr. Kapp was the founding executive director of the Washington State China Relations Council (华州中国交流理事会, 理事长) (www.wscrc.org), and from 1987 to 1994 he served as president of the Washington Council on International Trade (华盛顿州国际贸易委员会,会长) (www.wcit.org).  He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, and the World Affairs Council, whose World Citizen Award he received in 1994. He has been a frequent visitor to China since 1977. He and his wife Catherine live in Port Townsend, Washington State, USA.

    This event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies, the Leeds School of Business, and the Colorado China Council.

    Metered parking available to the south of Koelbel in Lot 475. There is also metered parking avaiable further away from Koelbel in the parking lots along Regent. In most of these lots, there are different areas for metered and permit parking, so please take care that you park in a metered area.

    Corporate Responsibility in the Contemporary Chinese Context

    Map of Koelbel

  • [Non-CAS Event] Brett L. Walker received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2013 for his project, "The Slow Dying: Asbestos and the Unmaking of the Modern World." He studies environmental history, the history of human health, and the history of science. His books explore how humans have altered the environment, or have been altered by the environment, across both historical time and geographic space. He investigates how nature, in manifestations ranging from infectious disease to nonhuman animals, has imposed its way onto the human past, as well as how humans have sliced, burned, extracted, and engineered their needs and desires onto Earth and its living organisms. Presented by the History Graduate Student Association.

    Brett Walker is best known as a distinguished environmental historian of Japan - he is the author of three books on the subject:  The Conquest of Ainu Lands: Ecology and Culture in Japanese Expansion, 1590-1800, The Lost Wolves of Japan, and Toxic Archipelago: A History of Industrial Disease in Japan.

  • [CAS Event] On Tuesday, February 4, the Center for Asian Studies is holding our first Asian Studies student event of the year. Undergraduate students and faculty are invited to join us at The Sink for an evening of socializing and networking with others in the university community who have similar interests. Asian Studies major and minors as well as interested students are all welcome. The Center for Asian Studies will provide the food, and students and faculty are responsible for purchasing their own beverages.

    At this event, we will formally announce the new minor in Asian Studies, which is a great opportunity for students to integrate Asian Studies into their undergraduate career without studying an Asian language or writing a senior thesis. The Center for Asian Studies directors will be there to answer questions about the Asian Studies major and minor.

    Asian Studies Meet and Greet

    The Sink is located at 1165 13th St, Boulder, CO 80302. To get there, go south on Broadway from Baseline and turn right on 13th St. From campus, just head to the hill. The Sink is in the complex behind Buchanan's Coffee Pub.

    Map of The Sink

  • [CAS Speaker Series] This event has been cancelled. Ambassador Christopher Robert Hill is the Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at The University of Denver, a position he has held since September 2010. In addition to overseeing the Josef Korbel School, Ambassador Hill is a monthly columnist for Project Syndicate and a highly sought public speaker and voice in the media on international affairs.

    Ambassador Hill is a former career diplomat, a four-time ambassador, nominated by three presidents, whose last post was as Ambassador to Iraq, April 2009 until August 2010. Prior to Iraq, Hill served as Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 2005 until 2009 during which he was also the head of the U.S. delegation to the Six Party Talks on the North Korean nuclear issue. Earlier, he was the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea. Previously he served as U.S. Ambassador to Poland (2000-2004), Ambassador to the Republic of Macedonia (1996-1999) and Special Envoy to Kosovo (1998-1999). He also served as a Special Assistant to the President and a Senior Director on the staff of the National Security Council, 1999-2000.

    Earlier in his Foreign Service career, Ambassador Hill served tours in Belgrade, Warsaw, Seoul, and Tirana, and on the Department of State's Policy Planning staff and in the Department's Operation Center. While on a fellowship with the American Political Science Association he served as a staff member for Congressman Stephen Solarz working on Eastern European issues. He also served as the Department of State's Senior Country Officer for Poland. Ambassador Hill received the State Department's Distinguished Service Award for his contributions as a member of the U.S. negotiating team in the Bosnia peace settlement, and was a recipient of the Robert S. Frasure Award for Peace Negotiations for his work on the Kosovo crisis. Prior to joining the Foreign Service, Ambassador Hill served as a Peace Corps volunteer where he supervised credit unions in rural Cameroon, West Africa.

    Ambassador Hill graduated from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine with a B.A. in Economics. He received a Master's degree from the Naval War College in 1994. He speaks Polish, Serbo-Croatian, and Macedonian.

    North Korean Nuclear Issue

     

    Map of Humanities

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] In this Luncheon Series talk, Marcus Perman of the Tsadra Foundation will discuss the culture of books in Tibet. In the context of written documents, if you ask the question, "what is sacred?" you get interesting answers from different religious thinkers, scholars, and practitioners. The reverence that appears to be shown for the written word and to particular texts in the Tibetan traditions might lead one to see similarities with Judeo-Christian traditions that have a history of holding not only a single book sacred, but also of establishing libraries and an entire field of textual studies, and translation studies. In Judaism, for example, the treatment of the Torah and its production, reproduction, and use is fascinating and perhaps extreme in the level of devotion to detail and the care of this sacred object. However, in Tibetan cultures we find a very different relationship with the production, consecration, and use of religious texts. We find the three-fold practice of wang, lung, and tri along with seemingly paradoxical practices in which the book is revered over and above its content, or vice versa. We find truly massive literary output in the form of Tibetan commentaries, but little care for reading what to many would be considered the "Buddhist Bible," the Kangyur. We will explore some of the practices related to "the culture of the book" in Tibet through discussing Jamgön Kongtrül Lodro Thayé (1813-1900) and the massive collections of texts he assembled in his lifetime. We will also look at the projects to reprint and then translate these collections in recent times.

    Spring 2014 Lucheon Series

  • [Non-CAS Event] A special 2-hour seminar led by Professor Mufti and open to graduate students across the humanities and social sciences. For this seminar, students will read and discuss Professor Mufti's essays "Orientalism and the Institution of World Literatures" and "Erich Auerbach and the Death and Life of World Literature". Please e-mail Karim.Mattar@colorado.edu for more information about the event, to register for the event, and for pdfs of Professor Mufti's essays.

  • [Non-CAS Event] CHA Faculty Fellow Work in Progress, featuring Suyoung Son, Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations. Letters had been established as one of the distinct literary genres as early as the second century in China, but they became a publishing phenomenon in the seventeenth century. The unprecedented popularity of publishing of letter collections raises the need to reexamine the nature of epistolary genre: why were the writers not satisfied with simply exchanging private letters but sought to publish and publicize them? What kinds of cultural and social expectations distinguished letter publishing from letter writing? By focusing on the letter of a publisher to a fellow publisher in the dispute over book proprietorship, this study demonstrates the ways in which the medium of the letter initially premised on privacy and intimacy between two correspondents was transformed into a social means to protect book proprietorship in the seventeenth century. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] CHPS Distinguished Speaker Series, featuring Peter Galison, Joseph Pellegrino University Professor, Director of Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Harvard University. A pre-event reception will be held at 2:45 in Hellems 269. Sponsored by the Committee for the History and Philosophy of Science, with funding provided by College of Arts and Sciences, Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Communication, Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, Geological Sciences, History, Philosophy, Mathematics, Physics, University Museum, and CHA. For further information, please contact rchps@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The question of who made your holiday gifts—or, more precisely, outsourcing and offshoring—is the subject of the next Social Sciences Today Forum at the University of Colorado Boulder.

    The event, featuring three experts, is scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 23, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Humanities 1B50.

    Three members of the CU-Boulder social science faculty will speak about outsourcing and offshoring for about 10 minutes each and then answer questions. The panelists are:

    James Markusen, Distinguished Professor of Economics

    Jennifer Bair, Associate Professor of Sociology

    Moonhawk Kim, Assistant Professor of Political Science

    The Social Sciences Today Forum, a regular series, is designed to help the public gain broader perspectives and deeper understanding of human society and how individuals relate to the community and one another. “Outsourcing and offshoring” is such a topic. Last fall, the forum focused on immigration and natural disasters.

    This forum brings the knowledge and expertise of social science faculty to the greater community and allows the community to ask questions of leading scholars.

    Free parking is available after 5 p.m. in Lot 254, 256 and 258 near Starbucks. Paid parking is available along Pleasant Street on campus in lot 380 east of Macky Auditorium. For a campus parking map, click here.

    For more information, click here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Join the Denver Art Museum Contemporaries for a brief introduction into the world of Arabic calligraphy, graffiti writing, street art and urban culture.  In addition to featuring Arabic graffiti and street art styles, this presentation also explores the traditional elements, modern approaches, and socio-political and cultural contexts that have shaped Arabic graffiti movements throughout the Middle East.  

    Spraycan Calligraphy: Graffiti Art from the Middle East is a brief introduction into the world of Arabic calligraphy, graffiti writing, street art and urban culture, and the artists, graffiti writers and typographers who keep the tradition alive. In addition to featuring a wide array of photos documenting Arabic graffiti and street art styles, this presentation also explores the traditional elements, modern approaches, and socio-political and cultural contexts that have shaped Arabic graffiti movements throughout the Middle East.

    Safa Samiezade-Yazd; Arts, Music and Culture Editor for Aslan Media, an online youth-driven media source providing alternative coverage of the Middle East and its global diaspora communities, holds a BA from the University of Denver and an MFA in Interdisciplinary Art from Goddard College in Middle Eastern art and culture, relational and community-driven art, and performance and intercultural studies.

    This event is being hosted by fellow WorldDenver Young Professional, Safa Samiezade-Yazd.  Following the Lecture, WorldDenver Young Professionals are invited to a networking reception at Rooster & Moon with Safa Samiezade-Yazd.

    The cost is $10 to AAA and DAMC members, $12 to DAM members, teachers, and students, and $15 to all others. Reservations are required. Click here or call 720-913-0130 for tickets. Please, contact blittle@denverartmuseum.org or call 720-913-0040 for further assistance.

    For more information, please click here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Cory Jorgensen of George Washington University will give a talk entitled "Reinterpreting the Reception of Jarir and al-Farazdaq's Flytings."

    This is part of a series of job talks presented by top candidates for the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations Languages & Literatures of the Pre-Modern Islamic World Assistant Professor Position.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Come listen to Nuptul Rinpoche, a Tibetan Buddhist lama of the Nyingma sect, from the remote Nubri valley of Nepal. Rinpoche will share what it is like to be a young reincarnate Buddhist master in a modern world. Rinpoche is currently visiting the U.S. as one of the Tenzin Gyatso scholars, an initiative by the Tenzin Gyatso Institute.

    There will be a reception following this event. 

    For more information, please contact Marcus@tsadra.org, or visit www.tsadrafnd.org.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Emily Selove of the University of Manchester will give a talk entitled "A Day in the Life of an 11th-Century Baghdadi Party-Crasher."

    This is part of a series of job talks presented by top candidates for the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations Languages & Literatures of the Pre-Modern Islamic World Assistant Professor Position.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Ilkka Lindstedt of the University of Helsinki will deliver a talk entitled "The Formative Era of Islam (ca. 600--1000 CE) in the Light of Arabic and Persian Historiography, Belles-lettres, and Epigraphy.”

    This is part of a series of job talks presented by top candidates for the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations Languages & Literatures of the Pre-Modern Islamic World Assistant Professor Position.

  • [Non-CAS Event] A nuclear deal with Iran?... Beginning of a new era of engagement with Iran?... Bad news for Israel and Saudi Arabia?... Sign of new possibilities with a new Iranian leadership or a political window of opportunity that will close too soon?... Open 2014 with a discussion with one of America's leading diplomats and an expert on Iran's nuclear program.  Ambassador Pickering and Dr. Walsh are both with The Iran Project sponsored by The Foundation for a Civil Society (www.fcsny.org).

    Ambassador Thomas Pickering holds the rank of Career Ambassador, the highest in the U.S. Foreign Service. In a diplomatic career spanning five decades, he was U.S. Ambassador to Israel, the Russian Federation, India, El Salvador, Nigeria, and Jordan. From 1989 to 1992, he was Ambassador to the United Nations in New York, and he then served as Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs. Earlier in his career, he was Special Assistant to Secretaries of State William P. Rogers and Henry Kissinger. He also served in the U.S. Navy and Naval Reserves.

    Jim Walsh is an expert in international security with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Security Studies Program. Dr. Walsh's research and writings focus on topics involving nuclear weapons and terrorism. Dr. Walsh has testified before the Senate on the issue of nuclear terrorism and on Iran's nuclear program.  He is one of a handful of Americans who has traveled to both Iran and North Korea for talks with officials about nuclear issues. Before coming to MIT, Dr. Walsh was Executive Director of the Managing the Atom project at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government.  He has taught at both Harvard and MIT.

    Nader Hashemi is Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Associate Professor of Middle East and Islamic Politics at the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies. He is the author of Islam, Secularism, and Liberal Democracy: Toward a Democratic Theory for Muslim Societies (2009) and the co-editor, with Danny Postel, of The People Reloaded: The Green Movement and the Struggle for Iran's Future (2011) and The Syria Dilemma (2013).

    Co-sponsored by the Center for Middle East Studies at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver. For more information, please contact World Denver at register@worlddenver.org.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] This is a lecture in the fifth in a series of successful international conferences held by the Center for Media, Religion, and Culture, which brings together an interdisciplinary community of scholars and media practitioners for focused conversations on emerging theoretical and methodological issues in media and religion at the global level. Dr. Pradip Thomas, a leading academic in the area of communication and social change, communication rights, religion and media, and the political economy of communications in India, will give a plenary lecture on the relationship between religion, media, and culture in India.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This exhibit features the collection of Chinese art and artifacts curated by Nina Williams and Andra Archer. The collection includes Chinese opera and Chinese minority costumes, puppets, adornments, and photographs. This collection will be on display until January 4, 2014. This exhibit is sponsored by Arts Brookfield in cooperation with Asian Art Coordinating Council. For more information, please go to artsbrookfield.com.

  • [Brown Bag Series] This talk will be presented by Adam H. Lisbon, Japanese Studies Librarian.

    Many citation management programs don’t really provide an easy, efficient, means of citing an item in multiple languages. Multi-Lingual Zotero (MLZ) lets researchers provide transliterations and/or translations in addition to the original language data that many academic journals require as part of their submission guidelines. MLZ proposes to solve this issue for researchers who work in multiple languages. For the CAS brown bag series I’d like to offer a simple example of how this software works, as its initial setup can be confusing. Like any technology, there are a few weaknesses, but it also provides many solutions. For students who will be soon preparing their papers/articles/thesis/dissertation, as well as professors embarking on a new research project, MLZ promises to make their research easier and more organized.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Continuing Education invites you to learn about Teaching English abroad, a popular way to get abroad for college grads. This short-term career could easily be an exciting and highly rewarding option for you as well! Meet our diversely and well-traveled panelists who will discuss personal experiences, teaching qualifications, accommodations, expenses, country-special info, etc.

    For more information, please visit conted.colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Dr. Arindam Chakrabarti of the Department of Philosophy at the Univerity of Hawaii in Manoa will speak about Buddhist atheism and the responses of classical Indian philosophers. Refreshments will be provided.

    Hosted by the Center for Religious Diversity and Public Life at UCCS and the UCCS Philosophy Club.

    For more information, please visit www.uccs/rdpl, or contact Dr. Geoff Ashton at gashton@uccs.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Join the Program in Jewish Studies, Hillel and the Certificate in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies for an intimate evening with award winning writer and poet, Almog Behar.  An Israeli Mizrahi (Jew of Arab descent), Behar will be reading poetry and prose in Hebrew, Arabic and English as well as be in conversation with Dr. David Shneer, director of the Program in Jewish Studies about his recent work. Behar's poetry speaks about issues concerning borders and crossing borders; memory and forgetfulness; home and exile; art, social and political protests; and tradition versus traditions.

    For more information, please contact jamie.polliard@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Join the Program in Jewish Studies, Hillel and the Certificate in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies for an intimate evening with award winning writer and poet, Almog Behar.  An Israeli Mizrahi (Jew of Arab descent), Behar will be reading poetry and prose in Hebrew, Arabic and English as well as be in conversation with Dr. David Shneer, director of the Program in Jewish Studies about his recent work. Behar's poetry speaks about issues concerning borders and crossing borders; memory and forgetfulness; home and exile; art, social and political protests; and tradition versus traditions.

    For more information, please contact jamie.polliard@colorado.edu.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The Center for Asian Studies is holding an information meeting for graduate students of any department who are interested in applying for the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (FLAS) for the 2014/2015 Academic Year and Summer 2014. FLAS offers up to $9,000 in tuition and fees and a stipend of $7,500 per semester during the academic year. During the summer, the fellowship offers up to $5,000 in tuition and fees and a stipend of up to $2,500. Please note that the 2014/2015 academic year fellowship is contingent on receipt of funds from the U.S. Department of Education.

    For more information, please contact Joanne Sakaguchi at joanne.sakaguchi@colorado.edu, or visit this page.

    FLAS Information Meeting

  • [Non-CAS Event] This event has been rescheduled from October 23 to November 20Ariana Maki holds a Ph.D. in Buddhist art history with minor fields of Himalayan art and Islamic art and architecture, granted by Ohio State University in 2012. Ariana has undertaken field research in India, Nepal and Tibet, and has been researching in Bhutan since 2007. In 2008-2009, Ariana served as Curatorial Fellow at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City, and volunteered at the National Museum of Bhutan in Paro between 2009 and 2011. In addition to her post at CU, Ariana is a researcher at the National Library and Archives of Bhutan, Thimphu and a contributing assistant curator to Himalayan Art Resources, an online database of visual culture. Her research interests include questions of power and patronage in artistic production, the development of Bhutanese art, and the intersections of image, text and religious practice.

    Coffee and dessert will be served. This event is hosted by the CU Art Museum. For more information, please visit cuartmuseum.colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Japanese jazz trio, the Ai Kuwabara Trio Project, is offering a free concert at Metro State University.

    For more information about the artist, please visit http://www.aikuwabaratrio.com/.

    Sponsored by the MSU Department of Music, the Golda Meir Center, the Consulate-General of Japan in Denver, and the Japan Foundation.

    For a map of the event location, please visit http://www.ahec.edu/kingcenter/directionslocation.htm.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This event has been canceled. Following the public lecture on Friday, the Saturday workshop will further explore Himalayan culture and geography.  Presenters include CU anthropologists and geographers who specialize in the region. Brot Coburn’s Saturday presentation will more specifically address the socio-economic and demographic changes within the Sherpa communities and provide a backdrop for a following panel discussion entitled “Big Egos, Thin Air.” Presenters will share their insights into the May 2013 conflict and respond to questions from audience members. After the panel, we will hold a curriculum session for educators to explore culturally informed and innovative ways to teach about the Himalayas in their classrooms. 

    To register for the workshop, please submit this form.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Brot Coburn's The Vast Unknown chronicles the first American ascent of Mt. Everest in 1963. In his presentation at CU, Coburn will contextualize this historic event within the Cold War, discuss many of the unique characters involved in the expedition, and speak to how both climbing on Everest and the mountain itself have dramatically changed over the past fifty years. The presentation will also address how climbing has impacted the Khumbu region and Sherpa communities in significant socio-economic and demographic ways, a topic on which Coburn has unique insights, having co-authored Touching My Father's Soul with Jamling Tenzing Norgay (the son of first Everest summiteer, Tenzing Norgay). Understanding the trajectory of how the climbing economy has transformed the Sherpa community is critical to discussing what precipitated the conflict between Sherpas and western climbers on Everest in May 2013, a topic that will also be addressed during Coburn's presentation.  

    The workshop on 11/16 has been canceled.

    New and Old Perspectives about Mt. Everest

    Map of Humanities

  • [Non-CAS Event] 10X10 is a global campaign to educate and empower girls. At the center of the campaign is a feature film, Girl Rising. It’s by an Academy Award nominated director (Richard Robbins) and features performances from Meryl Streep, Anne Hathaway, Selena Gomez, Salma Hayek, Alicia Keys, and others.

    This important film tells the stories of nine remarkable girls from around the world who are striving beyond circumstance, pushing past limits and demonstrating the extraordinary strength of the human spirit to overcome the odds. Yet it also carriesa powerful message: if we educate girls, we can change the future of some 66 million girls around the world who today only dream of going to school.

    You can watch the trailer here: http://10x10act.org/girl-rising.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Anthropology Graduate Student BrownBag committee will have a special guest this Thursday - Nevada Drollinger, MA Candidate in Religious Studies.

    This Thursday, November 14 at 12:15pm in Hale 450.

    Myanmar's nationalist 969 Movement has recently come to the attention of the Western media. Since Hannah Beech's July 1st article in Time Magazine, "The Face of Buddhist Terror," countless bottles of ink have been spilled trying to determine whether members of the 969 Movement still have the right to be called Buddhists, and whether this conflict should be characterized as "religious" or "ethno-nationalist." This presentation will examine the discourse surrounding the 969 Movement in Western news media, particularly examining articles and videos from The Atlantic, The Washington Post, BBC News, The Daily Mail Online, and TIME on Ashin Wirathu and the 969 Movement. It will also examine the 969 Movement's counter-narrative of the role the movement plays in the preservation of Buddhism and the Burmese race. Examining work that has been published outside of the academy has a critical role in shedding light on Western perceptions of Buddhism as ahiṃsā, religious authenticity, and the role of the scholar in public discourse.

    For more information, please contact Allison.Formanack@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Interested in a career in Africa and/or the Middle East? Attend this workshop to learn from a panel of professionals who have worked in these regions in various settings including nonprofit, government, education, volunteer, and private.  Sponsored by the International Affairs Program (IAFS), Global Studies RAP (G-RAP), and Global Fusion student group. Food will be provided.

    For more information, please contact career services at csevents@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Dialogue is a 70-minute documentary that follows four American and four Chinese university students as they travel together through Hong Kong and Southwest China. Intrigued by the complex context of Sino-US relations, together the characters explore elements of meaningful dialogue and cultural identity. Their shared travel adventures, emotion of culture shock, honest confrontations and discoveries about each other become doorways to deepen their understanding of the “other” and themselves. Although the film is set in Hong Kong and China, the “lessons learned” about intercultural understanding and the communication skills needed for conflict mediation and collaborative problem solving are applicable globally.

    Immediately following the film will be the IEW Reception in the Abrams Lounge in C4C. You're invited to attend.

  • [Non-CAS Event] A lecture by Mustafa Akyol.

    Mustafa Akyol is a political commentator and public intellectual based in Istanbul. He is a columnist for Hurriyet Daily News, Turkey’s foremost English-language daily, and Al-Monitor. He is the author of Islam without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty (2011), copies of which will be available for purchase at the event. He is also the author of five books in Turkish, including Rethinking the Kurdish Question (2006). His writings have appeared in Foreign Affairs, The Guardian, the Washington Post, and the Financial Times, among other publications.

    For more information, please write to Douglas Garrison at garrisondh@gmail.com, or visit their Facebook Event Page.

  • [Non-CAS Event] John Capowski, Professor of Law Emeritus at Widener University, will be our Jackson/Ho China Forum speaker on Wednesday, November 13 from 12:00-1:30 pm in Room 301 of Ben Cherrington Hall. He will discuss “An Unexpected Harmony:  Common Law Principles and China’s Judicial Reform Effort.” Sandwiches will be served.

    John Capowski is a visiting professor at Denver University’s Sturm College of Law and Professor of Law Emeritus at Widener University.  He has his Doctor of Law from the Cornell Law School. He has written in the areas of administrative law, evidence, lawyering skills, public benefits, and public interest law and taught courses including evidence, civil procedure, and comparative law.  He has directed Widener’s international programs in Venice and Sydney and also taught in its Geneva program. Since 2007 he has made several trips to Beijing to participate in the China’s International Symposia on Evidence, which have focused on the China’s judicial reform effort.  Articles he has presented there have been translated into Mandarin and published in two of China’s leading law journals.

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Ms. Dana Lewis at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng Zhao directly at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

    Part of the Fall 2013 DU Jackson/Ho China Forums. Please RSVP online at http://alumni.du.edu/capowski no later than November 12.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Christian art was first brought to Japan during the 16th century, however, its impact was minimal as the bakufu (military controlled government) forbade the propagation of Christianity.  A century later, the bakufu lifted the decree restricting the import of foreign books, though books related to Christianity were still forbidden. A special interest in science books and in Dutch Learning (Rangaku) subsequently developed, and thus was born a quasi-Western painting style in Japan.

    Currently Hiroko Johnson is Professor Emeritus at San Diego State University, where she has taught since 2000.  In 2011 she received an Outstanding Faculty honor.  She was educated at the University of Tokyo, Japan, where she had a Post-Doctoral fellowship, and California State University, Northridge before completing her Ph.D. at the University of Southern California. 

    Dr. Johnson has published much, in particular books on the subjects of Japanese prints and foreign influences on Japanese painting, and has been involved with many exhibitions including co-curating Dreams and Diversions at the San Diego Museum of Art (November 7, 2010).

    This event is free to AAA members and a guest, $5 for teachers and students, and $10 for all others. Reservations are recommended. Please contact blittle@denverartmuseum.org or call 720-913-0040 for assistance.

  • [Non-CAS Event] As part of International Education Week, the Office of International Education is hosting a Fulbright workshop presented by Dr. Dawn Odell from Lewis and Clark College.  Dr. Odell is a current Fulbright Ambassador for the Fulbright Scholar Program and a former Fulbright scholar to China.  

    If you have a PhD or other terminal degree in your field, are a U.S. citizen, and would like to teach and/or do research overseas with funding from a Fulbright grant, please join us.  Dr. Odell will speak about the Fulbright Scholar Program’s array of opportunities, and also her specific experiences as a Fulbright Scholar in China.  She will also answer questions about the Fulbright program.

    RSVP's are required as space is limited.  Please send your RSVP's and questions to: oie@colorado.edu.
    For more information, please go to http://www.colorado.edu/oie/admin/facultyfulbright.html and http://www.cies.org/.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] A lecture by Millie Creighton, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia.

    This presentation looks at the popularity of the Korean Wave (Hallyu or Hanryu, involving flows of Korean popular culture such as film, drama, singing groups) in Japan and some of the potential social changes or challenges it inspired. Tracing the introduction and rise of the Korean Wave through television dramas in Japan, and subsequent Japanese drama tourism to Korea, the talk explores how the ‘ethnic erotic economy’ for women within Japan (once emphasizing White Western males) shifted to Korean men, and how the intensive fandom of so-called middle-aged Japanese women challenged age, race, ethnic, and gender hierarchies within Japanese society while giving voice to a category who previously felt unempowered and little listened to or noticed. In addition to age and gender challenges, the presentation addresses issues of minorities and communities of ‘ethnic others’ in two countries once strongly proclaiming identities based on homogeneity now attempting to understand ‘multiculturalism’.  Looking at more recent ramifications of the Korean Wave in Japan, the talk addresses its place in Japan’s on-going work, leisure and entertainment culture of established adults, while exploring how it is linked to explorations of ‘gender bending’ in both societies, particularly among youth. The talk also addresses how the popularity of the Korean Wave in Japan, as well as the backlash against it, raises issues of difficult political and cultural relations between Japan, South Korea, North Korea, and at times China. 

    This event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies, the Korea Foundation, the Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, and the President's Fund for the Humanities.

    Japanese Fandom and the Korean Wave

     

    Map of Hellems

  • [Non-CAS Event] Beijing Bicycle revolves around a seventeen-year-old boy Guei (Cui) from the countryside who came to Beijing to seek work. He finds a job with a courier company, which assigns him a brand-new bicycle. After it is stolen one day, the stubborn Guei goes on a search for his missing bicycle. At the other end of the city, Jian (Li) is a schoolboy who buys Guei's stolen bicycle from a second-hand market. When Guei's search brings the two boys together, more than the ownership of the bicycle is brought into question. The film explores the theme of youth as well as several social issues, including class, youth delinquency, theft, and rural-urban socio-economic divisions and change.

  • [CAS Brown Bag Series] Amy Liu, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, will discuss Chinese Migration in Europe. In the past twenty years, Eastern Europe has become an increasing popular destination for Chinese migrants. In fact, Hungary is the top destination outside the OECD countries. What explains this development? This project identifies several politically-motivated explanations, including citizenship laws, presence of radical right-wing parties, and language policies in education.

  • [Non-CAS Event] An evening journey into the Heart of Japan and Soul of India, with three of the leading world music maestros. YO 世 means 'The World' or 'World Community' or 'This Generation.' The music of YO presents the ancient traditions of Japan and India in a fresh, creative and inspired vision. It is a celebration of global culture and community right now. Come join us for a magical evening of music, straight from Tokyo to Boulder, an event not to be missed.

    YO's concert in Boulder will be the biggest show of this 7-stop tour around the US West and Hawaii. I've already heard rave reviews of their shows in the Seattle area last weekend. These three classically trained and performance-polished hard-cooking musicians are bringing Indian and Japanese musical traditions into the 21st century and out to the world. 

    Tickets are $13.50 for general admission and $20 for the Gold Circle. Tickets are available online at www.TalaRecords.com or through the Boulder Theater Box Office. For more information, please visit the Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/events/1424282864453576/.

  • [Non-CAS Event] 'Diwali' is the festival of lights and colors celebrated with great fervor all across India. Every year the Indian Students Association (ISA) organizes a flamboyant and culturally enriched celebration for Diwali - The festival of Lights.

    This year's free, public event is happening on Saturday, Nov. 9, at 5:30 p.m. in the UMC Glenn Miller Ballroom.

    Performances at this year's Diwali event include Bollywood dances, cultural dances (viz. 'Kuchipudi', 'Bhangra' and 'Bharatanatyam'), classical music (using classical instruments like 'Sitar', 'Tabla' and Flute), a fashion show, and also band performances. The performances will be followed by delicious Indian dinner. Following that, we also invite you on the open dance floor until midnight to groove yourself to the Bollywood and 'Bhangra' tracks mixed by DJ Aashish B, one of the best bollywood DJs in North America.

    More information on Facebook.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The CU Japanese and Balinese Ensembles will be performing.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Simon Schuchat, former U.S. Deputy Consulate General in Shanghai, will be our Jackson/Ho China Forum guest lunch speaker on Friday, November 8 from 12:00-1:30 pm in Room 150 of Ben Cherrington Hall. He will discuss “Alliance Management and U.S.-China Relations.” Pizza will be served.

    Simon Schuchat is a recently retired U.S. Foreign Service Officer with three decades of experience in East Asia and the former Soviet Union, including service in Beijing, Shanghai, Moscow, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Washington DC.  He holds degrees from the University of Chicago, Yale University, Harvard University, and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces at the National Defense University.  He is fluent in Mandarin and has a working knowledge of Japanese and Russian.

    Please RSVP online at http://alumni.du.edu/schuchatno later than November 6.

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Ms. Dana Lewis at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao directly me at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [Non-CAS Event] World Trade Center Denver is holding an event about doing business with China. It is a half-day seminar on financial, legal, and operation aspects of doing business in China. For more information or to register, please click here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] A Van Maximilian Carlson Film. Bhopal! The Bhopal Disaster did not Happen. It is Happening.

    Screening featuring a Q&A with Sanjay Verma (survivor-artist, featured in the film). 

    Sponsored by CARTSS (The Center to Advance Research and Teaching in the Social Sciences), FOSEP (The Forum on Science Ethics and Policy), and the Department of Anthropology.

    For more information about the move, please go to www.bhopalithemovie.com.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Japan Foundation and the Consulate-General of Japan are presenting five screenings of Kiyoshi Kurosawa films in cooperation with International Film Series, part of the University of Colorado at Boulder. A prolific director whose career started in the 1980's, Kiyoshi Kurosawa occupies a realm between mass genre and the esoteric, somewhere between Alfred Hitchcock and Yasujiro Ozu. A free retrospective of his work will be presented in 35mm print at the Muenzinger Auditorium, University of Colorado at Boulder.

    On Sunday, November 3, Kiyoshi's film Barren Illusion  will be shown at 7:00 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium. Admission is free. 

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Japan Foundation and the Consulate-General of Japan are presenting five screenings of Kiyoshi Kurosawa films in cooperation with International Film Series, part of the University of Colorado at Boulder. A prolific director whose career started in the 1980's, Kiyoshi Kurosawa occupies a realm between mass genre and the esoteric, somewhere between Alfred Hitchcock and Yasujiro Ozu. A free retrospective of his work will be presented in 35mm print at the Muenzinger Auditorium, University of Colorado at Boulder.

    On Saturday, November 2, Kiyoshi's film License to Live  will be shown at 7:00 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium. Admission is free. 

  • [CAS Speaker Series] We are at a critical juncture in the troubled history of US Iran relations and the prospects of democracy in Iran. After a brief schematic account of this history--from the arrival of missionaries to the advent of the Second World War, from 1951 to 1979, and from 1980 till today--the two questions of Iran's pursuit of democracy and America's uneven approach to this pursuit will be discussed. The central focus of the talk will be the axiom that Iran today stands at the cusp of a cultural and political transformation--more societal than merely political--and only by grasping the essence of these changes can America formulate a policy that safeguards its own national interests while also respecting the pursuit of life, liberty and democracy for all in Iran.

    An Iranian –American historian and author, Prof. Milani presently is the director of Iranian Studies at Stanford University, and professor of International, Comparative, and Area Studies, a founding co-director of the Iran Democracy Project, as well as a research fellow at the Hoover Institution. He is also a prominent scholar of Iranian literature and culture. The most acclaimed recent book of his is Shah (Macmillan 2012), a biography of the last Shah of Iran in which Prof. Milani shows how Iran went from a politically moderate monarchy to a totalitarian Islamic republic. 

    Professor Milani has been invited to UC-Boulder by the Persian (Farsi) Program (Department of Asian Languages and Civilization), and this event has been sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations.

    The US and Prospects for Democracy in Iran

    Map of Humanities

  • [Non-CAS Event] The State Department is coming at the end of the month! The new Diplomat is Michael McClellan and he will be doing an info session on October 31st, in the Abrams Lounge in the Center for Community from 4:00-5:30. Don't miss this rare opportunity to meet with representatives from the U.S. Department of State about the diverse range of diplomatic careers available to you.

    If you are unable to attend or would like more information about the U.S> Department of State, visit us at careers.state.gov.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The Center for Asian Studies invites you to learn about global career opportunities with a panel of experts in Asia-related fields, including international business, travel, the public sector, and the legal profession. Panelists include Susan Brushaber, attorney; Laura Jackson, Senior Director of Air Service Development & Aviation Research at Denver International Airport; and Sandi Moilanen, International Division Director at the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade. Learn from these current professionals and get advice on how to use your education in a promising global career. A networking reception will follow. All majors welcome.

    Susan J. Brushaber, a Denver-based attorney admitted to practice in New York, New Jersey, and Colorado, advises clients, both foreign and domestic, on a wide range of legal issues,  primarily in the area of Intellectual Property Law, with particular expertise in the areas of technology development and  licensing, trade secret protection,  Intellectual Property Portfolio Management, E-commerce and the Internet, trademark prosecution and enforcement (including brand management and strategy), and copyright protection and enforcement.  She also advises clients on general corporate and commercial matters, especially in connection with the formation and management of foreign subsidiaries, strategic relationships, outsourcing and product distribution, procurement and supply. Prior to returning to private practice in 2006, Ms. Brushaber was the Director of International and Legal Affairs at, Quark, Inc., a leading software company headquartered in Denver, Colorado with subsidiaries located in Europe and Asia. She is currently a partner with Reinhardt LLP, an international law firm with offices in New York, Denver and Germany. Ms. Brushaber received a JD from Seton Hall Law School, an MA in Spanish from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and a BA in Spanish and economics from Hood College. She has served as counsel to companies working in South Korea, Japan, and China, and she is currently working with a company based in Bangalore, India.

    Laura L. Jackson is the Senior Director of Air Service Development and Aviation Research at Denver International Airport. Some of her current projects include managing DIA's efforts to secure nonstop service between Denver and targeted international destinations, directing airport-wide research initiatives and spearheading market intelligence activities related to the dynamic aviation industry. Jackson serves on the Board of Directors of the World Trade Center Denver, the Rocky Mountain French-American Chamber of Commerce, and the Swedish-American Chamber of Commerce of Colorado. She is also active with the Japan America Society of Colorado. Jackson received an MBA from the Thunderbird School of Global Management and a BA in Economics and International Studies from the University of Richmond. 

    Sandi Moilanen is the International Division Director at the Colorado Office of Economic Development & International Trade, where she manages the export promotion and inward investment attraction programs for the State of Colorado.  She has been part of the International Trade team for the past 10 years. Sandi brings 8 years experience in manufacturing and international finance to the position. Prior to joining the OEDIT, Sandi managed international financial transactions and overseas production planning for London Fog-Pacific Trail, an apparel manufacturer.  She helped develop European distribution and managed a network of international dealers.  She has experience as a Customs Broker and an international logistics agent. Sandi earned a Masters of Business Administration and a Masters of Science in International Affairs degrees from the University of Colorado at Denver.  She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Puget Sound in Foreign Languages and International Affairs.  Sandi has spent time studying and working in Germany.

    Career Tracks in Asian Studies

  • [CAS Speaker Series] CHINA Town Hall is a national day of programming designed to provide Americans across the United States and beyond the opportunity to discuss these issues with leading experts.  This year’s event will feature a live webcast with Madeleine Albright, the 64th United States Secretary of State. This will be followed by a presentation by our on-site speaker, Melinda Herrold-Menzies of Pitzer College.

    Madeleine K. Albright is chair of Albright Stonebridge Group, a global strategy firm, and chair of Albright Capital Management LLC, an investment advisory firm focused on emerging markets.

    In 1997 Dr. Albright was named the 64th, and first female, Secretary of State of the United States. At the time, she was the highest ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government. From 1993 to 1997, Dr. Albright served as the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations and was a member of the President’s Cabinet.

    Dr. Albright is a professor in the practice of diplomacy at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. She chairs both the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs and the Pew Global Attitudes Project. She is also the president of the Truman Scholarship Foundation and a member of an advisory body, the U.S. Defense Department’s Defense Policy Board. In 2012, she was chosen by President Obama to receive the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in recognition of her contributions to international peace and democracy.

    Melinda Herrold-Menzies is an associate professor of intercollegiate environmental analysis at Pitzer College and the Claremont Colleges. Her research focuses on environmental policy in China; conflicts over natural resources in China and Russia; and on conservation, gender and community development.

    Dr. Herrold-Menzies received her doctorate from the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management of the University of California, Berkeley, and her M.A. in International Relations from Yale University.

    To see the press release for this event, please click here.

    To see an article written in the Daily Camera by CAS Associate Director Timothy Weston in which he puts the themes of this event into a larger perspective, please click here.

    This event is free and open to the public.

    Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and the National Committee on United States-China Relations.

    CHINA Town Hall

     

    Map of Hale

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Japan Foundation and the Consulate-General of Japan are presenting five screenings of Kiyoshi Kurosawa films in cooperation with International Film Series, part of the University of Colorado at Boulder. A prolific director whose career started in the 1980's, Kiyoshi Kurosawa occupies a realm between mass genre and the esoteric, somewhere between Alfred Hitchcock and Yasujiro Ozu. A free retrospective of his work will be presented in 35mm print at the Muenzinger Auditorium, University of Colorado at Boulder.

    On Sunday, October 27, Kiyoshi's film Serpent's Path  will be shown at 7:00 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium. Admission is free. 

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Japan Foundation and the Consulate-General of Japan are presenting five screenings of Kiyoshi Kurosawa films in cooperation with International Film Series, part of the University of Colorado at Boulder. A prolific director whose career started in the 1980's, Kiyoshi Kurosawa occupies a realm between mass genre and the esoteric, somewhere between Alfred Hitchcock and Yasujiro Ozu. A free retrospective of his work will be presented in 35mm print at the Muenzinger Auditorium, University of Colorado at Boulder.

    On Friday, October 25, Kiyoshi's film CURE  will be shown at 7:00 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium. Admission is free. 

  • [Brown Bag Series] This talk will be presented by Lucas Carmichael, Religious Studies, CU-Boulder.

    American Daoist Masters have always operated in a hybrid space of Asian religions more broadly construed. Because of their eclectic backgrounds and their eclectic receptions, early figures associated with Daoism in the United States tend to be marginalized and understudied. This paper focuses on one figure who has thus far received little attention: Gia-fu Feng (1919-1985). In addition to his Stillpoint Foundation, Feng made his most lasting impressions as a “Daoist Master” through his translations of the Daode jing (1972) and of the Zhuangzi (1974) and through his associations with Alan Watts, Jack Kerouac, and the founders of the Eslen Institute. Feng, his associates, and his texts deserve closer attention in order to better understand the transmission of Daoist teachings in America.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Project Nur will be having our first event of the semester, Islam and Muslims: Conversations and Experiences.

    With the premise that there is nothing universally agreed upon in any religion, we will start with some relatively agreed upon basics of Islam before we move into divergences in interpretation, practice, and meaning. A plethora of topics will be profiled, including: various non-Middle Eastern manifestation of Islamic practice, plurality within Islamic religious minorities, gender and sexualities, and the specific difficulties faced by American Muslims post-9/11.

    Please feel free to come visit our table sometime this week and submit anonymous questions (to be addressed at the meeting and on the Project Nur Facebook page) or in person.

    Project Nur is a student group on campus dedicated to being a voice for religious tolerance and appreciation for religious diversity. While we're especially based out of the Islamic community, we're committed to stand up against intolerance wherever we see it. We believe that intolerance towards Muslims is based from singular Arab-centric and Sunni-centric portrayals of Muslims in dominant cultural narratives (partly reinforced by many in the Islamic community). Consequently, Project Nur attempts bring light to the vast diversity Islamic expression around the world. To this effect, we do not consider ourselves a religious organization, we consider ourselves a human rights organization: We advocate for understanding Muslims, not Islam. All are welcome!

  • [Non-CAS Event] With the Global Seminar: International Operations, travel to Hong Kong, China this summer and study Operations Management in one of the largest trading centers in Asia. You will engage in daily site visits to local businesses and learn first-hand about manufacturing in mainland China during an overnight field trip to Guangdong Province.

    Learn more at this meeting: October 23,  5-6 p.m. in Koelbel 375

    More information: http://studyabroad.colorado.edu/?go=HongKongGS
    Questions? E-mail the faculty directors at Stephen.Lawrence@colorado.edu or Lori.Seward@colorado.edu

  • [Non-CAS Event] On this Global Seminar: Doing Business in China (Beijing and Shanghai), you will explore important topics related to succeeding in China’s business environment,  meet with business leaders, visit industrial sites and universities, and seek to understand challenges faced by businesses operating in China.  In addition, you will discover key cultural features of China ranging from village life to the Great Wall.

    Learn more at this meeting: Oct 22, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Koelbel 302

    More information: http://studyabroad.colorado.edu/?go=ChinaBusinessGS
    Questions? E-mail the faculty director at tracy.jennings@colorado.edu

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Norlin Library will have a Q&A panel on applying for JET. JET applications are due November 26, 2013.

    Not sure what to write for that essay? We’ll give you some advice about what to expect, the process for waiting and what to do if you don’t get into JET. There are other options for going to Japan and teaching!

    We will also field questions on teaching English in Korea, so Korean enthusiasts please come too!

    The Event will be a 45 minute panel discussion. 3 Jet Alumni, including the CU Japanese Studies Librarian Adam Lisbon (Kōbe City JET 2004-2007) will be there to help you out.

  • [Non-CAS Event] NYU Professor Angela Zito, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Religious Studies and Director of the Religious Studies Program, is this year's Kirk Lecturer.

    For more information, please visit the event webpage here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] NYU Professor Angela Zito, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Religious Studies and Director of the Religious Studies Program, is this year's Kirk Lecturer.

    For more information, please visit the event webpage here.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] This talk will be presented by Janet Gyatso, Hershey Professor of Buddhist Studies, Harvard University.

    Traditional Tibetan medicine sometimes found its Buddhist heritage and its urge for empirical knowledge of the body to be at odds, and made unusual efforts to separate itself from religious ways of knowing. At the same time, the line between yogic and sensory observation was not easy to draw. This lecture will explore how the body became the focus of some of the most interesting theoretical reflection, from the dawn of Tibetan Buddhism into the time of the height of the central Tibetan government's powers in the 17th century.

    This event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies in conjunction with Naropa University.

    Ways of Knowing the Body in Buddhist Tantra and Tibetan Medicine

    Map of Hale

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Discover China this summer on this Global Seminar held in Xi’an and sponsored by CU’s Study Abroad Office, the Center for Asian Studies and the Tang Fund. With Herbst Program of Humanities’ faculty Anja Lange, you will get a first-hand look at China by studying it through literature and participating in campus life at Xi’an Jiaotong University. You also will visit the Qinling Mountains,  the Terra Cotta Army, Tang Dynasty tombs, and spend 3 days in Beijing. All participants will receive a generous scholarship funded by the Tang Fund. Please attend this informational meeting for more information, and visit the website at http://studyabroad.colorado.edu/?go=XianGS. Questions should be directed to Anja Lange at Anja.Lange@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Graduate School is pleased to sponsor a talk with discussion by Prof. Leonard Cassuto on the academic job market, with an emphasis in the humanities. Professor Cassuto's talk will be specifically graduate student oriented, but will prove useful to faculty and to all those interested in the humanities.  He will start with some concrete, practical advice to job seekers, and use it as a springboard to a larger discussion of the meaning of the job market, and how our understanding of it has to change going forward.

    Leonard Cassuto is Professor of English at Fordham University.  He writes regularly on graduate education issues for the Chronicle of Higher Education and is widely recognized as one of the most important and influential voices in the current debates about that issue.

    Refreshments will be served.

    This event is sponsored by the graduate school. For more information, please contact John Stevenson at john.stevenson@colorado.edu.
     

  • [Non-CAS Event] The current Dalai Lama is one of the world’s most recognizable religious figures. Many know him as the exiled Buddhist leader of Tibet, others simply understand that he is a man of great wisdom. Tenzin Gyatso is actually the fourteenth in a lineage of spiritual teachers who are recognized as incarnations of an enlightened being, Avalokiteśvara. This lecture explores portraiture of these teachers in Tibet and discusses how different audiences, media and contexts for the Fourteenth Dalai Lama's image coincide with the leader’s shifting role in the political, social, and religious spheres.

    Professor Sarah Magnatta's doctoral work in Art and Art History at The Ohio State University focuses on Tibetan art history. Her dissertation research is, “Imaging the Dalai Lama: Incarnations in Art and Practice.” Published articles include the Stanford Journal of East Asian Affairs, “Forbidden Image: The 1996 Chinese Ban on Imagery of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama.” Professor Magnatta holds an M.A. in Art History from the University of Denver (2005).  She is currently teaching Asian art courses at DU.

    Reservations recommended. Tickets are $5 for teachers and students and $10 for everyone else. Please contact blittle@denverartmuseum.org.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Join the Chennai Committee of Denver Sister Cities International to celebrate the annual Mahatma Gandhi cultural event and lecture. This year's speaker will be Prakash Kumar, Associate Professor of South Asian History at Colorado State University. Refreshments and discussion will follow the lecture.

    For more information, please call DSCI 303-832-1336, or go to www.denversistercities.org

  • [Brown Bag Series] This talk will be presented by Daryl Joji Maeda, Associate Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies.

    Bruce Lee is best known as a Chinese martial artist who vaulted across the Pacific to become a global superstar in the 1970s.  However, this perspective reinstantiates problematically rigid notions of East and West and valorizes cultural purity.  In contrast, this paper examines Lee as a transnational figure thoroughly enmeshed in trans-Pacific flows of people and culture dating back to the nineteenth century and accelerating in the twentieth century.  It reconsiders Lee’s martial arts in terms of hybridity and travel, especially in the context of the Cold War.  Furthermore, it explores how Lee’s personal life, including his interracial marriage and children, reconfigured popular notions of the Orient even before the repeal of anti-miscegenation laws in the U.S. and Nixon’s visit to China.  For four decades, Bruce Lee has offered one of the most popular glimpses of Asia to American audiences and it is time for scholars to properly narrate his story as one of hybridity, intermixture, and crossings.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] A talk by Scott Kennedy, Associate Professor of Departments of Political Science and East Asian Languages and Cultures at Indiana University. 

    Chinese government agencies, companies, and NGOs are becoming much more significant players in every area of global governance, from trade remedies to technical standards setting to rules governing transnational investment. This presentation will explain how effectively Chinese are learning, utilizing and shaping the rules of the game in these and other areas. Chinese effectiveness varies widely across regime areas, and different kinds of Chinese companies have become more adept than others in their involvement. At the same time, China's political system presents substantial obstacles to all Chinese being more effective and the country as a whole playing more of a leadership role globally. This project is based on a decade of research involving in-depth interviews of government officials, company executives, lawyers, journalists, and international organization staff in China, the US, Europe, Japan, and Australia.

    This event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and Leeds School of Business.

    Chinese and Global Governance

    Map of Koelbel

  • [Non-CAS Event] Indian Dalit literature, which can be traced back to a corpus of writings from Maharashtra in the 1960s, refers to literature of the oppressed, usually associated with a diverse group of people historically considered the lowest among the Indian population and known as "untouchables."  While Dalit literature developed in response to concerns specific to Indian social and cultural history, over the last twenty years Dalit literature has got itself a spot in the World Republic of Letters through translations into English. This talk will introduce the history and the development of Dalit literature as both a regional and global literary phenomenon, looking specifically at the politics played by English language publishers and the global market in its dissemination.  The talk will also address confluences between the development of Dalit literature and that of Afro-American literature and the literature from Francophone African culture areas, written in French and Creole.

    Kannan M. is Researcher and Head of the Project on Contemporary Tamil at the French Institute of Pondicherry (IFP), India. He is the author and editor of various books, articles, essays, and poems, both individually and in collaboration. He has organized various conferences and workshops involving contemporary Tamil literature and its place in the contemporary social milieu, and its links with Classical Tamil literature. He has published translations of literary works from Tamil into both English and French, and from English into Tamil. He has guided the research of many doctoral students from India and abroad, and established a large collection of books, journals, articles, and manuscripts in the IFP library’s Contemporary Tamil section, working toward building a Centre for Contemporary Tamil at the IFP.

    For further information contact Jennifer Clare at jennifer.clare@coloradocollege.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Join the Chinese Student and Scholar Association (CSSA) for a fun, interactive session. This brown bag will teach you some helpful tricks for pronouncing Chinese names. Sponsored by CSSA and International Student and Scholar Services. Free refreshments are provided.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Dance, science, ancient Asian puppetry and traditional fables intertwine in choreographer and "punk ballerina" Karole Amitage's powerful exploration of connections among humans and animals, science and art, culture and nature. For more information about this performance, please visit armitagegonedance.org.

    This is part of the College of Music's Artist Series program. Tickets start at $14. Please visit cupresents.org for more information.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Takayama Music Book Flute Orchestra will be performing in downtown Denver, in the Pavilions, on Saturday, September 28, at 2:00 and 3:00 (each performance is different). This is a free event, so come on down and support this troupe of lovely and talented musicians. Hang out after each show and meet the players, find out about Takayama, Denver's Japanese sister city. You will be enchanted.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This free, all-day workshop, sponsored by the University of Denver Department of Religious Studies, offers University and area attendees a unique opportunity to develop their knowledge of Islam, past and present, as well as to learn practical techniques for teaching about Islam in world history courses, Middle East studies courses, and related fields - as well as to prepare for consulting or non-profit work with Muslim communities in the United States and abroad.

    University graduate students, faculty, and staff, as well as Colorado-based graduate students, faculty, staff, teachers, education students, and community members are welcome to register for this workshop. Please email Professor Andrea L Stanton to register.

    Please note that you must attend the entire workshop to receive a certificate of completion.

    For more information, please visit http://www.du.edu/ahss/religiousstudies/news/teachingislam.html.
     

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Professor Matthew Hull is a member of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. He is known for his research on colonial and contemporary bureaucracy, documents, and institutions in Pakistan and South Asia. His keynote lecture will address bureaucracy and corporations in South Asia, and he will discuss his new research on corporate sincerity. This keynote lecture will be part of the annual interdisciplinary graduate student conference sponsored by the Department of Anthropology.

    This event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies, the Department of Anthropology, and the Department of Communication.

    What's in a Claim?

    Map of Hale Science

  • [Brown Bag Series] This talk will be presented by Sarah Tynen, a Graduate Student in the Department of Geography at CU-Boulder.

    The project takes an ethnographic approach to examining urban redevelopment in order to address the everyday nuances of the uneven geographies of housing development. For the ethnographic study, I examined the popular rhetoric that justifies social stratification through a qualitative analysis of personal narratives and experiences of gated community and dilapidated neighborhood residents.

    The project examines the relationship between economic development and inter-group tensions on a local scale. I contextualize my research in the broader global processes of increased capital mobility to engage with debates that address the political economy of increased globalization and neoliberalization. The project builds on the extant literature on the role of economic development in the contestation between social classes for urban space.

    Chinese urban development is following the American model of the entrepreneurial city, but China’s unique regulatory climate of political economy creates a built environment that is not yet fully understood. By addressing questions of segregation, economic development, and identity formation on the local scale in urban China, the research will contribute to a broader academic understanding of the impacts of uneven spatial development. This research therefore questions the effect of development efforts to simultaneously regulate and deregulate various urban spaces based on social status and household income.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Dr. Thomas Fingar, Deputy Director of National Intelligence (DNI) during the first term of the Obama administration, former Chairman of National Intelligence Council, and former Assistant Secretary for Research and Intelligence (INR) at the State Department, will discuss“If China Could Remake the Global Order, What Would it Look Like?”

    China’s “rise” has been achieved through participation in the international system led by the United States, but many predict that Beijing will attempt to replace the US-led global order with one shaped by its own vision and priorities. If China had an opportunity to refashion the global order, what would it change and what would it seek to accomplish? Fingar’s talk will examine systemic, historic, and situational factors likely to shape China’s objectives and expectations in the overdue effort to replace or re-engineer post-WW II arrangements made inadequate by their success.

    Tom Fingar is currently the inaugural Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University.

    For more information, please visit the forum website here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This month’s happy hour benefits CU-Boulder Career Services and its professional dress stipend for CU students. 50% of the night’s registration fees will go toward professional attire awards for a couple deserving students. Current CU-Boulder students will be given the opportunity to enter the 100 Words for $100 contest where they could win a gift card for professional interview attire at 29th Street Mall.

    This event is free for current CU-Boulder students, $5 for 2140 and Chamber members, and $10 for non-members.

    For more information or to register, please click here.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] This illustrated talk will focus on the Boxer Crisis of 1900, looking at how it has been understood as linked to "catastrophes" of different sorts. The anti-Christian Boxers were inspired to take action initially in part because of a natural catastrophe, in the form of a devastating drought, which they claimed was due to local gods being angered by the worship of a foreign deity.  Once the Boxers laid siege to the foreign legations in Beijing, some Western commentators, influenced by the time's Yellow Peril notions, began to fixate on the idea that the rising could have a catastrophic impact on all of Christendom.  Finally, due to the brutal measures used to suppress the Boxers, the foreign invasion that lifted the siege of Beijing have come to be seen in China as having had catastrophic consequences for the country.   Among the themes the speaker will address are the way that these different catastrophic sides of the events of 1900 have been emphasized and downplayed in Chinese and Western presentations of the Boxer Crisis in textbooks, journalism, and various forms of popular media, from films and novels to performances by Buffalo Bill's troupe and an episode of the Buffy the Vampire Slayer television show.  Also explored will be the way that memories of and stories about the Boxers have affected Chinese relations with the West up to the present. 

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom is Chancellor's Professor of History at UC Irvine and often writes about Chinese history for newspapers and magazines.  He is the author, most recently, of China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know (2010 and 2013 editions).

    This event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and the Program for Teaching East Asia.

    The Chinese Crises of 1900

  • [Non-CAS Event] ALC is holding an Open House for students interested in the South Asia and Middle East Certificate Programs, as well as courses in Hindi-Urdu, Farsi, and Arabic.

    For more information, please contact Peter Knapczyk at peter.knapczyk@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Yin and yang, masculine and feminine, and reality and fantasy will intertwine and fuse on stage with two plays by celebrated playwright David Henry Hwang.

    Hwang's 1981 Pulitzer Prize finalist The Dance and the Railroad - part of his Trilogy of Chinese America - tells the story of a former opera star and his brother, who are working as coolie laborers at a 19th-century railroad labor camp during a strike.

    The Sound of a Voice (1983) is a haunting ghost story inspired by Japanese folk tales, films and Noh theater. In a remote corner of a forest, a man comes to kill a "witch" - or is she? - who has lived as a hermit for many years.

    This event will be held at multiple times:

    • September 18-21, 7:30 p.m.
    • September 21-22, 2:00 p.m.
    • September 22, 6:30 p.m.

    The cost of admission is $5 for high school students, $10 for CU students, and $12 for general admission.

    For more information, please contact cupresents@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Come and celebrate the traditional Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival with the Chinese Students and Scholars Association! Enjoy moon cakes, Chinese meal, performances, cultural display, games, and win prizes. Free admission to all comers.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Our potluck is back; thanks to "Arto" Suharto Rizkiadi!

    The first fall 2013 Indonesian Potluck is, on Saturday, September 14, 2013 (Next week; at the usual time/place).  Sorry for the short notice.  Mark on your calendar for the next one on October 12, 2013; we are planning to have it on the 2nd Saturday of each subsequent month.

    Bring family, teachers, and friends, and any main dishes from your own cultures to share. Students may bring drinks, fruits, or desserts.

    Note: This building is located between Broadway and Pleasant Street on campus. Please enter from the entrance facing Pleasant Street, where there is a stone archway and a little cove. There are double doors and it’s a handicap entrance. The doors will be locked. Please call 303-570-4846 (Arto’s number) and someone will open the doors for you.

    Come a little before 6:00 and have more time to socialize, and help with the setup. Hope to see you all at the Potluck, and have a great day!

  • [Non-CAS Event] Dr. Gordon Davis was director of the Iraq Cultural Heritage Project in Baghdad between 2009 and 2011. His talk focuses on the repair and renovation of the Iraq National Museum, the reopening of the museum's eleven galleries, relocation of world-famous collections to modern collection storage, and the process of capacity building for museum and archaeology professionals in Iraq. 

    Dr. Davis, a museum consultant, has been director of museums at Illinois State University and Wichita State University where he was also in charge of the museum studies program, executive director of the Aurora History Museum, senior advisor for the Bahrain National Museum (Kingdom of Bahrain).  He has also worked with museums in Africa. Davis holds a master's and doctorate from Indiana University, Bloomington.

    This event is free to AAA member and a guest. It is $5 for teachers and students and $10 for the general public. Reservations are recommended. Please contact blittle@denverartmuseum.org or call 720-913-0040 for assistance.

  • [Brown Bag Series] This talk will be presented by Patricia Yarrow, a CU Alumna.

    My ultimate goal after gaining my M.A. in Japanese Literature in the EALC, Boulder department was to return to Japan, settle into teaching English in a Tokyo university, and continue my areas of research. While I have found happiness teaching English in Japan, I benefited by not going directly from university graduate student life to university teaching in Tokyo. Instead, I worked my way up from working in grade schools, to junior and high schools. Along the way, I learned diplomacy and how to extract the silver linings from the following collection of situations any English teacher may encounter: the Mormon-Japanese family English racket buried off the coast of Osaka; wage-slavery to a notorious branch of a high-school outsourcing company in Yokohama accompanied by a year of pathetic wages in an English chain but with all the hours one could stand; punishing commutes by train and bus; evening business classes outsourced to valiant but cruelly fatigued engineers; and, in a military school, students saluted me, then slept blissfully. I now teach in two universities four days a week, with reasonable commutes and a community of colleagues. I have time to consider the future: retirement, benefits, social security, health care, and paying off my student loan. I hope anyone interested in teaching English in Japan will come listen to my experiences, which for all the ups and downs, still qualify as "very fun".

    Map of Hale

  • All new international students, even those who didn't sign up for BFIS, are welcome to join Boulder Friends of International Students for their annual fall Welcome Picnic on Sun, Sept. 8 from 5-7 p.m.! Free food! Enjoy a picnic at nearby Martin Park and meet some great people from the community. Use your RTD bus pass to take the SKIP bus south to Broadway and Table Mesa Drive. The park is on the north east corner.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Founded in 1987 by Qi Shu Fang, the Qi Shu Fang Peking Opera Company is dedicated to the preservation and performance of the Chinese theatrical tradition, Peking Opera. The goal of the opera is to strengthen pedagogy through developing workshops where instruction in Peking Opera is truly an interactive process and creating an apprenticeship program so students who are trained in Peking Opera can experience what it is like to perform it live. In terms of performance, it is the Company's goal to keep reaching a broader crossover audience by widening the repertoire, revitalizing the genre, and devising creative audience development means. This event is comprised of four parts:

    September 5

    • 11:00 a.m., Public Screening of Documentary Film, Little Tiger, Acting Studio Room C-242, Theatre Building. Little Tiger is a documentary that unfolds through the life of Qi Shu Fang, a  cultural icon known by millions for her singing and fighting, and traces her  fearless struggle to transmit her art to America. Awarded 2nd place in Best  Documentary by the Indie Gathering,  the film was also selected for the  Vancouver Asian Film Festival and the Los Angeles Pacific Film Festival. 
    • 12:00 p.m., Q&A with artists

    September 6

    • 2:00 p.m., Chinese Opera Make-Up Demonstration and Workshop, Make-Up Room, Basement, Theatre Building

    September 7

    • 2:00 p.m., Chinese Opera Combat Workshop, Loft Theatre, Theatre Building

    September 8

    • 2:00 p.m., Public Performance, University Theatre, Theatre Building. This performance will consist of Ribbon DanceFighting in the DarkThe Art of Face Mask Changing, and The Monkey King and Princess Iron Fan. Admission is free.

    This event is supported by the Roser Visiting Artist Endowment and funded in part by the (IMPART) Implementation of Multicultural Perspectives and Approaches in Research and Teaching Awards Program and by the Center for Asian Studies.

    The Qi Shu Fang Peking Opera Company Residency

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Book Arts League and the Lafayette Cultural Arts Commission are pleased to present a performance and workshop by Setsuhi Shiraishi, a professional calligrapher from Japan. This event is comprised of two parts:

    Performance: Ms. Shiraishi will perform her calligraphy, accompanied by music, at the Lafayette Public Library, 775 W Baseline Rd, Lafayette, Friday, September 6, 7-9 pm. Co-sponsored by the Lafayette Cultural Arts Commission. The admission is free.

    Workshop: Ms. Shiraishi will hold a workshop in calligraphy Saturday, September 7, 3-5 pm at the Ewing Farmhouse, 1915 N 95th St, Lafayette. Her 2-hour workshop will cover making 4 calligraphy pieces. The cost for the workshop is $30 per person, and the maximum number of participants is 12 people. To register, please visit www.BookArtsLeague.org.

    Her work will be offered for sale at both events. Ms. Shiraishi is a lecturer of the Aoyama Calligarphy School and is actively performing in Europe and Japan. She has "pursued her own unique style of calligraphy while expressing the world of traditional calligraphy. The world she creates by subliming calligraphy into a composite art through collaboration with music, craft or fine art is highly regarded." Her thoughtfulness and all-encompassing art forms are the qualities that make her performances flow elegantly. For more information about the artist, visit her website at http://shiraishi.modalbeats.com/profile-english.html.

    For more information about this event, please visit http://www.bookartsleague.org/classes-and-workshops/.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Book Arts League and the Lafayette Cultural Arts Commission are pleased to present a performance and workshop by Setsuhi Shiraishi, a professional calligrapher from Japan. This event is comprised of two parts:

    Performance: Ms. Shiraishi will perform her calligraphy, accompanied by music, at the Lafayette Public Library, 775 W Baseline Rd, Lafayette, Friday, September 6, 7-9 pm. Co-sponsored by the Lafayette Cultural Arts Commission. The admission is free.

    Workshop: Ms. Shiraishi will hold a workshop in calligraphy Saturday, September 7, 3-5 pm at the Ewing Farmhouse, 1915 N 95th St, Lafayette. Her 2-hour workshop will cover making 4 calligraphy pieces. The cost for the workshop is $30 per person, and the maximum number of participants is 12 people. To register, please visit www.BookArtsLeague.org.

    Her work will be offered for sale at both events. Ms. Shiraishi is a lecturer of the Aoyama Calligarphy School and is actively performing in Europe and Japan. She has "pursued her own unique style of calligraphy while expressing the world of traditional calligraphy. The world she creates by subliming calligraphy into a composite art through collaboration with music, craft or fine art is highly regarded." Her thoughtfulness and all-encompassing art forms are the qualities that make her performances flow elegantly. For more information about the artist, visit her website at http://shiraishi.modalbeats.com/profile-english.html.

    For more information about this event, please visit http://www.bookartsleague.org/classes-and-workshops/.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Zhao Li visits Colorado from Bejing China’s Chinese Modern and Contemporary Art Document Research Center at the Central Academy of Fine Arts.

    Zhao Li is professor at the Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA), the art history department of which he graduated from in 1989. He obtained his PhD in arts in 1998. Zhao has served as deputy director of the art history department and vice president of the college of humanities at CAFA. Today, in addition to his positions at CAFA, Zhao has served as distinguished research fellow at the Institute for Cultural Industries Peking University, researcher at the Institute of Fine Arts, China National Academy of Painting, art director at Art Beijing Art Fair and Art Value magazine, director of the AMRC Art Market Research Center, fund executive of Chinese Modern & Contemporary Art Document (CCAD) Research, deputy secretary-general of Wu Zuoren International Fine Arts Foundation, founding director of Asian Art Education Foundation, and director of US S.P.A.M. Art Foundation.

    Zhao’s work focuses on art history, theory, Chinese calligraphy and painting, contemporary art criticism, art economic research, exhibition planning and promotion. His published works include Status Quo of Chinese Contemporary Oil Painting, Chinese Oil Painting Literature, Jingjiang Painting Research, School of Jingjiang Painting, Chinese Contemporary Art (editor), Chinese Art Market Research Report (editor), White Paper on China Art Market (author), Annual Research Report on Chinese Art Market (editor), Brief History of Chinese Art (co-author), Compendium of Chinese Art History (co-author). Zhao has participated in numerous curating projects, including the “China Pavilion for the International Architecture Exhibition of the Venice Biennale in 2009″, “Series Exhibitions of Chinese Fine Arts Founders in the 20th Century”, “Series Exhibitions of Fine Arts Pioneers in New China”, “Global Art Collection Summit”, “Art Economic Forum”, “Boao Forum – Asian Art Salon”, and “Annual Conference of Collectors of Chinese Contemporary Art”.

    This event is part of the Visiting Artist Program. For more information, please contact the CU Department of Art and Art history at finearts@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Kidron Valley-Wadi El Nar Basin Master Plan is a unique cross-boundary cooperative effort designed to restore and enrich one of the most important -- and most polluted -- river valleys in the Middle East. The 28-kilometer Kidron/Nar Valley runs from the center of Jerusalem, out to the east through Palestinian villages, and eventually into the Dead Sea.

    The project Master Plan encompasses ecological, historical, cultural, physical, economic, and geographical elements agreed upon by Israelis and Palestinians that serve the best interests of the Valley and its diverse residents.

    Liora Meron, architect and co-chair of the Kidron Valley/Wadi El Nar Planning Team, will discuss some of the challenges, and the needs for environmental and social cooperation, in a much-disputed part of the world -- and how people in Boulder can cooperate with and participate in this vital project.

    Please contact Best Ornstein or Bill Cohen at boulderipprojects@gmail.com.

  • Peter Eichstaedt is a veteran journalist and author dedicated to revealing the stories behind human rights tragedies around the world. He has lived and worked in Afghanistan for two years, first in 2004 and most recently from 2010 to 2011 where he served as country director for the Institute for War and Peace Reporting. His latest book, entitled Above the Din of War: Afghans Speak about Their Lives, Their Country, and Their Future-and Why America Should Listen was released in April 2013. It offers a look into the lives of ordinary Afghan citizens and provides a forum for the everyday people to be heard. He has reported stories from around the world including Africa, Eastern Europe and The Hague, Netherlands, where he covered African war crime trials.  He currently lives in the Denver area.

    From 5:30-6:30, there will be light hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar. Then, from 6:00-7:15, there will be the talk and question and answer session with Peter Eichstaedt. The cost is $20 for WorldDenver members, $35 for non-members, and $15 for WorldDenver young professionals.

    Peter Eichstaedt will also be signing copies of Above the Din of War, which will be available for purchase from HearthFire Books.

    Please email Register@WorldDenver.org with questions or call 303-446-4921.