Past Events

Here is a list of all the past Speaker Series events, Brown Bag events, and non-CAS events:
for additional years, click here

  • [Non-CAS Event] Dr. Johns' illustrated talk will introduce and explore the work of Kenjiro Nomura, Kamekichi Tokita and Takuichi Fujii, well established modernist painters in the Pacific Northwest prior to World War II. They were forcibly removed along with others of Japanese descent, to the Minidoka Relocation Center in Idaho. Each left a record of his experience but until recently, their stories have been largely unknown, their names forgotten, and their accomplishments overlooked.

    The work of Dr. Johns has helped situate the significance of these artists within the context of American history before, during and after WWII.

    Questions?
    Please contact Beverly Little, blittle@denverartmuseum.org or 720-913-0040, for questions and further details.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Little more than two months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, fear and racist propaganda culminated in Executive Order 9066, which enabled the forced removal of 110,000 people of Japanese descent from the West Coast. Little more than two months later they were gone. In Seattle this included the respected modernist painters Kenjiro Nomura, Kamekichi Tokita, and Takuichi Fujii. All three were incarcerated at the Minidoka Relocation Center in Idaho, where each left an eloquent record of his experience. Until recently their names were largely forgotten, their accomplishments overlooked. In an illustrated talk, Dr. Johns discusses her work in reclaiming the artists' stories and demonstrating their place in American art history.

    Questions?
    Please contact Beverly Little, blittle@denverartmuseum.org or 720-913-0040, for questions and further details.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Join the WorldDenver Young Professionals for a great networking happy hour. This month we'll be featuring an organization called Meet the Middle East. Come hear from them about  their upcoming Young Professionals Expedition and enjoy networking with other WorldDenver Young Professionals!

    Meet the Middle East (MTME) is dedicated to fostering relationships between the US and Middle East region through education and travel for students, adults and businesses. Learn more about MTME here!

    MTME Young Professionals Expedition This MTME trip is geared toward young professionals that are looking for an educational adventure!  For those interested in touring Palestine and Israel, this innovative travel experience will encompass hiking through the dessert, trekking through the winding streets of Jerusalem, climbing the 121 steps of the monastery on the Mount of Temptation, while still enjoying relaxing afternoons under the sun on the sand of the Mediterranean or floating in the Dead Sea and so much more.  This trip is a cornucopia of outdoor excursions and countless opportunities to hear from different stakeholders of the conflict while interacting with the locals that feel so passionately about the region.

    Food and drink specials all evening. For more information, contact register@worlddenver.org. Visit http://www.worlddenver.org/event-1873292 to RSVP.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Please join the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations for singing, dancing, speeches, skits, and poetry recitation at the 3rd Annual Boulder Chinese Speech Contest on Thursday, March 19th at 5:00pm in HUMN 150 with a reception to follow in the HUMN 1st Floor Lobby. This event is free and open to the public.

    Boulder Chinese Speech Contest

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] This talk will be presented by Younghwa Lee, a visiting scholar at the Center for Asian Studies and a professor in the Department of English in Sun Moon University in South Korea.

    In her research, Younghwa Lee explored the motivations for teachers and students in South Korea to be engaged in the writing sections of English as Foreign Language classes. Until recently, there has been scarcely any research that investigates the purposes of Korean students on EFL writing courses at university. In her research, Lee comprised a questionnaire for 43 writing teachers and interviews with 8 students. Teachers felt that teaching of writing in English was essential for students who would engage in jobs related in English and for those who wished to improve their general English proficiency, as well as offering an understanding of the linguistic and cultural differences between the Korean- and English-speaking worlds. Students, on the other hand, felt that learning how to write in English more effectively and systematically was an integral part of learning a foreign language. The desire to get a job or get into university were also motivating factors. The conclusion indicates that there are some differences between the teachers' views and students' views on teaching and learning EFL writing.


    Spring 2015 Luncheon Series

  • [Non-CAS Event] Please join the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations for Hindi Night on Tuesday, March 17th at 5:30pm in HUMN 150. Hindi Night is organized by faculty and students of the Hindi language at CU and includes student presentations and performances related to the study of Hindi and South Asia. This event is free and open to the public.


    Hindi Night

  • [Non-CAS Event] Please join the English Graduate Student Council in welcoming Amitava Kumar, novelist, poet, journalist, filmmaker, and Helen D. Lockwood Professor of English at Vassar College, as our esteemed guest speaker on March 17, at 4:30pm in the Center for British and Irish Studies, Norlin M549. Professor Kumar will give a wide-ranging talk, as well as read from his 2014 success, A Matter of Rats: A Short Biography of Patna, which ruminates on one of the world's oldest cities and capital of Bihar, India's poorest province.

    *PLUS: As a special promotion, EGSC is offering a limited number of free copies of A Matter of Rats to interested attendees. Email egsc@colorado.edu to reserve your copy today!

    Ah, the Deadening Language of Academia

  • [CAS Speaker Series] A collaborative effort between faculty and graduate students, this conference, organized by the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, is designed to encourage new approaches to Asian Studies through the consideration of contemporary transnational literature, film, performance, and criticism. The event will feature as its keynote speaker acclaimed transnational writer Tawada Yōko, as well as a selection of transnational scholars working at institutions across the United States and worldwide.

    Additional details at http://bouldertransnational2015.weebly.com.

    Sponsored by:

    The Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations
    Association for Asian Studies Northeast Asia Council
    Center for Humanities and the Arts
    President's Fund for the Humanities
    Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research
    Japan Foundation
    Center for Asian Studies
    Department of German and Slavic Languages and Literatures

    Schedule

    Friday, March 13

    Documentary Showing: 6:00 – 8:00 pm - Ikyō no naka no kokyō – A Home Within Foreign Borders
    ATLAS 102

    Saturday, March 14th

    Breakfast: 8:30 – 9:15 am
    Opening Remarks: 9:15 – 9:30 am
    Panel One: Colonialism/Post-colonialism - 9:30 – 11:00 am
    ATLAS 102

    A Conversation on Transnational Writing: 11:00-12:00
    Yōko Tawada and Levy Hideo; Monitor, Faye Kleeman, University of Colorado

    Catered Lunch: 12:00 – 1:15 pm
    HUMN 230 & 245

    Panel Two: Graduate Panel on Theoretical Approaches - 1:15 – 2:45 pm
    ATLAS 102
    
    Panel Three: Media - 3:00 – 4:30 pm
    ATLAS 102

    Break: Snacks and Drinks
    ATLAS 102

    Keynote Speech: 5:00 – 6:15 pm
    Yōko Tawada TITLE TBA

    Dinner: 6:30 – 9:00 pm  Alumni Center

    Sunday, March 15th

    Breakfast: 8:30 – 9:00 am
    ATLAS 102

    Panel Four: Translation - 9:00 – 10:30 am
    ATLAS 102

    Panel Five: Comparative Studies - 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
    ATLAS 102

    Catered Lunch: 12:45 – 2:00 pm
    UMC 247

    Panel Six: 2:00 – 3:30 pm
    ATLAS 102
    
    Closing Remarks: 3:30 – 3:45 pm
    ATLAS 102

    Monday, March 16th
    Graduate Student Seminar with Yōko Tawada: 3:00 – 6:00
    UMC Gallery


    Transnationalism and its Discontents

  • [CAS Speaker Series] A collaborative effort between faculty and graduate students, this conference, organized by the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, is designed to encourage new approaches to Asian Studies through the consideration of contemporary transnational literature, film, performance, and criticism. The event will feature as its keynote speaker acclaimed transnational writer Tawada Yōko, as well as a selection of transnational scholars working at institutions across the United States and worldwide.

    Additional details at http://bouldertransnational2015.weebly.com.

    Sponsored by:

    The Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations
    Association for Asian Studies Northeast Asia Council
    Center for Humanities and the Arts
    President's Fund for the Humanities
    Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research
    Japan Foundation
    Center for Asian Studies
    Department of German and Slavic Languages and Literatures

    Schedule

    Friday, March 13

    Documentary Showing: 6:00 – 8:00 pm - Ikyō no naka no kokyō – A Home Within Foreign Borders
    ATLAS 102

    Saturday, March 14th

    Breakfast: 8:30 – 9:15 am
    Opening Remarks: 9:15 – 9:30 am
    Panel One: Colonialism/Post-colonialism - 9:30 – 11:00 am
    ATLAS 102

    A Conversation on Transnational Writing: 11:00-12:00
    Yōko Tawada and Levy Hideo; Monitor, Faye Kleeman, University of Colorado

    Catered Lunch: 12:00 – 1:15 pm
    HUMN 230 & 245

    Panel Two: Graduate Panel on Theoretical Approaches - 1:15 – 2:45 pm
    ATLAS 102
    
    Panel Three: Media - 3:00 – 4:30 pm
    ATLAS 102

    Break: Snacks and Drinks
    ATLAS 102

    Keynote Speech: 5:00 – 6:15 pm
    Yōko Tawada TITLE TBA

    Dinner: 6:30 – 9:00 pm  Alumni Center

    Sunday, March 15th

    Breakfast: 8:30 – 9:00 am
    ATLAS 102

    Panel Four: Translation - 9:00 – 10:30 am
    ATLAS 102

    Panel Five: Comparative Studies - 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
    ATLAS 102

    Catered Lunch: 12:45 – 2:00 pm
    UMC 247

    Panel Six: 2:00 – 3:30 pm
    ATLAS 102
    
    Closing Remarks: 3:30 – 3:45 pm
    ATLAS 102

    Monday, March 16th
    Graduate Student Seminar with Yōko Tawada: 3:00 – 6:00
    UMC Gallery


    Transnationalism and its Discontents

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Part of the ALC "Transnationalism and its Discontents" Conference. The conference will begin Friday evening with a screening of the documentary, Ikyō no naka no kokyō - A Home Within Foreign Borders. Levy Hideo (1950-) is the first Westerner to write novels full-time in Japanese. A Home Within Foreign Borders follows Levy as he returns to Taichung, Taiwan, for the first time in half a century. Prompted by an invitation to speak at Taichung's Tunghai University, he makes the journey accompanied by poet Suga Keijirō, producer of the film, and Wen Yuju, former pupil and fellow author (herself a Taiwan-national writing in Japanese). Ōkawa Keiko's camera captures Levy without reserve as he dares to step into the space he once called "home," at times fumbling uneasily, at times a joyous child reborn.

    The screening will begin at 6:00 p.m. in ATLAS 102, and will be followed by a Q&A session with Levy Hideo and producer Suga Keijiro.

    A Home Within Foreign Borders

     

  • [Non-CAS Event] Join us Friday, March 13th from 5-7pm at the CU Art Museum for an informal, fast-paced series of mini-talks, each highlighting contemporary Tibetan artworks from a unique background and perspective.

    Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art explores the tensions between an ancient culture's unbroken artistic tradition and the personality-driven contemporary art world. The artworks selected for Anonymous reflect how Tibetan artists around the world are examining questions of identity, self-expression and the roles of tradition in an increasingly globalized society. 

    Speakers:

    Holly Gayley, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies, CU Boulder
    Carole McGranahan, Professor, Anthropology, CU Boulder
    Sarah Magnatta, Lecturer, Art History, University of Denver
    Ariana Maki, Lecturer, Art History and Religious Studies, CU Boulder
    Sonam Nyenda, Graduate Student, Religious Studies, CU Boulder
    Tamdin Wangdu, Executive Director, Tibetan Village Project
    Emily Yeh, Professor and Chair, Geography, CU Boulder

    To find out more about Anonymous, please visit http://www.contemporarytibetanart.org/.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] Wildlife conservation needs support to protect rhinos, elephants, and other endangered species from cruel poaching that may lead to extinction within the next ten years. Rhino horns are used in Chinese medicine, primarily in Vietnam, and China has a major industry in carving of ivory.

    AREND is a sensor aircraft for aerial surveillance specialized for detecting people, large animals, and specific shapes such as crashed aircraft. The AREND aircraft is an unmanned aerial system (UAS) designed from the bottom up to hold select sensors in modular arrangements. This translates to higher quality resource management, efficacy, capability and versatility, and lower operating cost for the National Parks organizations of Wildlife Reserves in Africa and elsewhere.

    For a related article on the connection between China and the Africa ivory and rhino horn market, visit https://networks.h-net.org/node/22055/discussions/62621/breaking-news-china-connection-africa-ivory-rhino-horn-smuggling.


    Spring 2015 Luncheon Series

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Professor Morris Rossabi of the City University of New York will offer new insights into the history of the Mongol empire. Most people perceived the thirteenth-century Mongols as plunderers, rapacious, and murderers and believed that their invasions and rule were destructive, if not disastrous. Over the past two decades, specialists have challenged this depiction of the Mongols and of Genghis Khan and have focused on the Mongols’ contribution to trade, relations between East and West, and cultural, religious, technological, and artistic diffusion. These recent works have not ignored the bloodshed and the colossal damage the Mongols wrought, but they also have attempted their role in Eurasian history. This slide-illustrated presentation describes and assesses Genghis as an individual and the Mongols as a group.

  • [Non-CAS Event] How does Japan, our closest Asian ally, perceive the United States at the dawn of the "Asian Century"? Why should this matter for Colorado businesses? In a top-down society like Japan, public perceptions and political alliances matter. Japan is a massive, wealthy market for U.S. business. Good relations between the United States and Japan feed business interests on both sides of the Pacific. Is Japan as positive about "the land of the free" as we are?

    Please join the Consulate General of Japan in Denver and the Japan America Society of Colorado for this special presentation. Featuring a keynote address by Professor Toshihiro Nakayama, PhD, Keio University. With a special welcome by Mr. Tadahiko Yamaguchi, Deputy Consul-General of Japan in Denver. Introductions and Q&A moderated by T.R. Reid, author and journalist.

    $700 for a sponsored table for 8 with sponsorship recognition
    $350 for a sponsored half-table for 4 with sponsorship recognition
    $45 for JASC members
    $55 for the general public
    $35 for students (must present ID)

    Register online - space will be limited: www.jascolorado.org.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Ramin Jahanbegloo is York-Noor Visiting Chair in Islamic Studies and Associate Professor in Political Science at York University in Toronto. He was awarded the Peace Prize by the United Nations Association in Spain (UNA) and is an Advisory Board Member of PEN Canada. He is the author of several books, including (in English): Time Will Say Nothing: A Philosopher Survives an Iranian Prison; The Spirit of India; Conversations with Isaiah Berlin; Beyond Violence: Principles for an Open Century

    As head of the Department of Contemporary Studies of the Cultural Research Centre in Tehran, he brought a stream of Indian, European and North American intellectuals to lecture in Iran — among them Fred Dallmayr, Timothy Garton Ash, Jürgen Habermas, Agnes Heller, Michael Ignatieff, Adam Michnik, Antonio Negri, the late Richard Rorty and the late Paul Ricoeur — serving as a kind of philosophical ambassador between Iran and the outside world. In April 2006 Jahanbegloo was arrested in Tehran and charged with plotting a ‘Velvet Revolution’ in Iran and placed in solitary confinement for four months.

    Among the hundreds of scholars across the world who signed an Open Letter to Iran’s president demanding Jahanbegloo’s immediate release were Kwame Anthony Appiah, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Noam Chomsky, J.M. Coetzee, Juan Cole, Umberto Eco, Jürgen Habermas, Ernesto Laclau, Martha Nussbaum, Orhan Pamuk, Charles Taylor, Tzvetan Todorov, Immanuel Wallerstein, Cornel West, Howard Zinn, and Slavoj Žižek.

    Sponsored by: CU Boulder Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations,
    The University of Denver Center for Middle East Studies, and CU Boulder Housing & Dining Services

    This event is free and open to the public.


    Nonviolence and the Struggle for Democracy in Iran in the Era of Nuclear Negotiations

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Boulder International Film Festival will show Meet the Patels, a 2014 USA Feature Documentary (88 min). Fresh out of a breakup with his American girlfriend,Ravi Patel is freaked out that he’s 30, still single and is now under kneebuckling pressure from his parents to get married. During a vacation to India with his parents and filmmaker sister Geeta, Ravi learns that “Patel” is one of the most common surnames in India, and he is struck with how overwhelmingly happy the marriages are of his Patel family and friends. Ravi decides that the semi-arranged marriages of India might not be so bad. Back in America, he enlists the help of his matchmaker mother and his advice-spouting father who send him on a whirlwind of dates around the U.S. via the “Patel Matrimonial Convention” websites. Will Ravi’s sister ever get to shoot a wedding?

    Directed by Geeta Patel and Ravi Patel

    The 2015 Boulder International Film Festival will be March 5-8. For more information about the Boulder International Film Festival, please visit http://www.biff1.com/biff-2015/.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Kenneth Chan of the University of Northern Colorado will present on Hong Kong director Stephen Fun's two-part 3D martial arts extravaganza, Tai Chi Zero and Tai Chi Hero. These kung fu flicks would have been unremarkable as Hong Kong entries to the genre if not for the fact that the director has amalgamated, rather creatively, the martial arts film with a form of retro science fiction: steampunk films. While the deployment of this fin de siècle fantasy aesthetic injects new life to contemporary martial arts cinema (since Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon renewed global attention to the genre in 2000), Chan wishes to unpack its cultural logic by suggesting (1) that the film reformulates the familiar tension between Chinese cultural traditionalism and technologized modernity, and (2) that it forces a rethinking of China's and Chinese cultures' relationship to the West, especially with the rise of China as a modern economic giant and a major player in 21st century global capitalism. Does technology function as a cinematic/cultural trope to signify China's entry into the circuit of cosmopolitan engagement? And if so, what are the ideological and cultural implications of this mode of representation?

    This event is part of our 2014-15 "Mediating Asia" series.


    Steampunk-ed Kung Fu

  • [Non-CAS Event] Japanese guests  Kazunori “Uhyo” Sugiura and Masaaki “Saikawa” Sato provide a colorful introduction to Otaku culture, comike and cosplay. Hear about current trends in this global phenomenon, and connect with your local anime and manga community.

    4-5:30 p.m. Presentation
    5:30-7 p.m. Reception: light refreshments served

    Free and open to the public. Costumes welcome.

    A part of ATLAS March Mayhem Week
    http://atlas.colorado.edu/marchmayhem

    Directions to CU-Boulder's Roser ATLAS building:
    http://atlas.colorado.edu/directions

  • [Non-CAS Event] At this Career Services' "Go Global" Event, a TED talk speaker will present to students on how - at the age of 25, right after her graduation - she managed to move overseas, get a job, and travel 25 countries without much money and prior experience. She will share with students specific strategies on how to go aboard and how to find jobs, internships, scholarships, and research funding. The workshop will be followed by Q&A and networking session with snacks and refreshments.

    If you want to know about the speaker, here is her recent TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KmFGlUQCQA

  • [Non-CAS Event] Asian/Asian American Women Movements: Come join the Women's Resource Center to delve into the herstory of Asian women! Sandra No, Udval Altangerel, and Hikari Kumagai will discuss identity and life experiences including both historical and contemporary dynamics among Asian and Asian American women.

  • [CAS Event] Join the Center for Asian Studies for an evening of pizza and networking. Meet other Asian Studies majors, minors, and interested students, as well as members of our faculty. Hear about new developments in the Asian Studies program and meet our new Asian Studies instructor, Colleen Berry. All students are welcome, so bring a friend and come and learn more about Asian Studies at CU.

    Asian Studies Meet & Greet

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Keynote addresses this year will be given by both Professor Ding Xiang Warner of Cornell University and Professor Michael Emmerich of the University of California, Los Angeles. Professor Warner will give her presentation on the topic “When Stone Speaks: Challenges and Opportunities for 21st-century Sinology” from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. on Friday, February 27th and Professor Emmerich will present his topic "World Literature as The Tale of Genji" from 10:30 to 11:45 a.m. on Saturday, February 28th.

    CUBASGA

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Keynote addresses this year will be given by both Professor Ding Xiang Warner of Cornell University and Professor Michael Emmerich of the University of California, Los Angeles. Professor Warner will give her presentation on the topic “When Stone Speaks: Challenges and Opportunities for 21st-century Sinology” from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. on Friday, February 27th and Professor Emmerich will present his topic "World Literature as The Tale of Genji" from 10:30 to 11:45 a.m. on Saturday, February 28th.

    CUBASGA

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] In this talk, Loriliai Biernacki, Associate Professor in Religious Studies, will address the idea of wonder in medieval Indian Tantra. For the West, the notion of wonder early in the tradition bifurcates into two somewhat divergent conceptions. For Socrates and Plato wonder is the beginning of philosophy, and beckons to an openness, an indeterminacy that stops the constrictions of speech. For Aristotle, on the other hand, wonder prompts us to search for cause and effect. It is a goad, a curiosity that leads to its own erasure as the spellbound silence of wonder is replaced by knowledge. For Aristotle ignorance provokes wonder, yet wonder is not appropriate for mature philosophers. The medieval Indian philosopher Abhinavagupta, writing in the early 11th century, however, tracks the notion of wonder in a different fashion, linking wonder, camatkāra, with the capacity for a vital self reflexivity. In this presentation, Biernacki will examine the implications of Abhinavagupta's conception of wonder.


    Spring 2015 Luncheon Series

  • [Non-CAS Event] THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED DUE TO WEATHER. A Social Sciences Today Forum. Speakers will examine the global refugee crisis from three different perspectives. From people fleeing the war-torn areas of the Middle East to those seeking freedom from religious persecution to others who must leave their home because of natural disasters to those seeking a better life, the numbers speak to a global humanitarian crisis.

    Featuring:

    • Tania Barham, Department of Economic
    • Zygmunt Frajzyngier, Department of Linguistics
    • Aysegul Aydin, Department of Political Science

    Each panelist will speak for about 15 minutes & then answer questions from the audience.

    Click here for more info.:
    http://artsandsciences.colorado.edu/magazine/2015/02/cu-experts-to-discuss-unfolding-refugee-catastrophe/.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Please join the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations Arabic Language Program on Wednesday, February 25th for Arabic Movie Night in HUMN 1B90.

    All are welcome, feel free to bring a friend!

    Captain Abu Raed

  • [Non-CAS Event] Born in Kathmandu, Nepal, Tsherin Sherpa studied traditional Tibetan thangka painting from age 12, with a short foray to Taiwan to study Mandarin and Computer Science in his 20's. After his return to Nepal and subsequent move to the US in 1998, Tsherin continued working and teaching as a thangka artist, but in recent years has explored the detachment experience caused by the Tibetan Diaspora in relation to the traditional art. His classical images of Tibetan deities morph into a swirling abstract form that illustrates this sense of groundlessness.

    Admission for Students and Teachers: $5
    Admission for General Public: $10

    Questions?
    Please contact Beverly Little, blittle@denverartmuseum.org or 720-913-0040, for questions and further details.

    To find out more about Anonymous, please visit http://www.contemporarytibetanart.org/.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Tsherin Sherpa, whose artwork will be on view at the CU Art Museum Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art exhibition, will visit CU on Tuesday, February 24 to give a public lecture.

    Born in 1968 in Kathmandu, Nepal, Tsherin Sherpa studied traditional Tibetan painting methods from the age of 12 under his father, Master Urgen Dorje, a renowned thangka artist from Ngyalam, Tibet.

    Sherpa moved to Taiwan in 1988 to study Mandarin and Computer Science. Three years later, he returned to Nepal working along with his father in numerous painting projects. In 1998 he moved to the USA working as a thangka artist and as instructor at several Tibetan Buddhist Centers in California.

    Tsherin Sherpa has, in recent years, shifted away from traditional subjects to depict more contemporary concerns. His precise and immaculate paintings of Tibetan spirits and deities are explorations of the detachment experienced by the Tibetan Diaspora in relation to their homeland.

    Sherpa has been included in numerous groundbreaking exhibitions around the world including The Scorching Sun of Tibet (2010) in Beijing, Tradition Transformed–Tibetan Artists Respond (2010) at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York, Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art (2013-2015) at the Dorsky Museum at SUNY, New Paltz, the Queens Museum of Art in New York, and the CU Art Museum in Boulder, Colorado. In 2012 Sherpa had his first solo show, Tibetan Spirit, at Rossi & Rossi, London. He has also completed residencies at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco and the Dharamsala International Artists Workshop (in collaboration with Khoj), and in 2010 was awarded the Himalayan Fellowship by the Rubin Museum of Art and completed at the Vermont Studio Center, USA.

    Tsherin Sherpa's artist statement:

    "My works have always been an attempt to merge the gap between sacred and secular, icon and ordinary and past history and contemporary. As nomadic people, we Tibetans seem to possess the ability to adapt into many different environments. As our culture merges with others, I'm curious how we will maintain and celebrate our unique essence at the same time it is evolving. These personal experiences are explored through the use of my Protector series.

    "I take the classical images of Tibetan deity and manipulate their form to create an abstract form that carry over this sense of groundlessness.

    "In traditional Tibetan painting a formal grid system is used for the placement of a deity’s body in the correct posture. Without that grid tradition, the protectors almost appear to be lost in a swirling vortex, trying to find their new form. Through this process the chaos begins to subside to be transformed into somewhat abstract or an unfamiliar form."

    To find out more about Anonymous, please visit http://www.contemporarytibetanart.org/.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Public screening of the new documentary film “Miss Tibet: Beauty in Exile.” Director Norah Shapiro will be at the showing, and will do a Q&A after the film.

    For more info on the film, and to watch the trailer, visit http://www.misstibetbeautyinexile.com/.

    Free and open to the public.

  • [CAS Event] Open to all majors, Career Tracks in Asian Studies will introduce you to professionals with Asian expertise who work in international business and in organizations that build local connections with Asia. Come learn how you can apply your Asian interests in a global career!

    Jan Goerzen is the Event and Marketing Manager at WorldDenver, a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing a deep understanding of global affairs and cultures. She has held this position since March of 2012 when WorldDenver was formed. Prior to joining WorldDenver as a founding staff member, Jan interned with Institute of International Education- Rocky Mountain Region, where she assisted in organizing Humphrey Fellow and Fulbright Scholar seminars. Jan earned her B.A. in International Affairs from the University of Colorado-Boulder with an emphasis on Culture/Development and Asia. During her university years she enjoyed engaging with international students through Conversation Partners, as well as serving as a resident advisor and orientation leader. In addition, Jan gained experience in fundraising from the University of Colorado Foundation. An American born and raised in Indonesia, Jan speaks Bahasa Indonesian and in the summer of 2010 she returned to Indonesia as a camp counselor for Indonesian students learning English.  Jan maintains her language skills by participating in monthly potlucks with the Indonesian community in Boulder.

    Stanley Harsha, a Colorado native and CU graduate with a BA International Relations (1980), was inspired to pursue an international career because of experiences studying abroad at the University of Veracruz, Mexico and University of Costa Rica. He started his career as a journalist, working for newspapers in Colorado as well as The Daily Journal and Reuters in Caracas, Venezuela. Joining the Foreign Service in 1986, he spent most of his career in Asia, including 12 years in Indonesia. During his 28-year diplomatic career, his work ranged from managing performing arts and educational exchanges, to crisis management and interacting with Muslim youth at hundreds of schools.

    He retired from the Foreign Service in 2013 and now divides his time between Conifer, Colorado and Indonesia.  He is the Director of International Relations for Indonesia Education Partnerships, establishing ties between Indonesia and institutions of higher education in the U.S.  In addition, he voluntarily promotes Colorado higher educational ties with Asia, in partnership with Study Colorado.

    His book, tentatively titled, Indonesian Memories:  An American Diplomat’s Life in Indonesia, will be published in Indonesia (in Indonesian and English) in April 2015.  Primarily for an Indonesian audience, the book compares Indonesian culture to that of the U.S.  The book also presents a critical analysis of the U.S. government’s public diplomacy strategy to counter terrorism in Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim majority nation.  The book compares democracy and human rights in Indonesia and the U.S., raising concerns about increasing intolerance worldwide. 

    Before retiring, he served as a senior policy advisor for the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at State Department (2011-2013) and as Director of the Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board (2011-2012).  

    Overseas, he served as Consul General in Medan, Indonesia (2009-2011), responsible for the Sumatran consular district (population 50 million), during which time he coordinated U.S. emergency response to numerous natural disasters and terrorist threats.  He was also tasked to protect American citizens. 

    He was the Deputy Political Counselor and Labor Attaché in Jakarta (2006-2009), leading the Democracy Unit team responsible for issues such as politics, religion and human rights.  He also coordinated U.S. Mission policy on Trafficking in Persons in Indonesia, including lobbying the Indonesian government to better protect its citizens from trafficking.  He advocated on behalf of high profile persons who were victims of gross human rights violations.    

    As the Information Officer in Jakarta (2001-2004), he led the public information campaign in Indonesia during the troubled post-9/11 period, acting as the U.S. Embassy spokesperson and advocating for U.S. policy on the war against terrorism and communicating with the Muslim community.

    He also served as the Charge d’Affaires ad interim at the U.S. Embassy in Timor Leste (2007) during a time of turbulent civil unrest and mass internal displacement of citizens.   

    His Foreign Service assignments also included:  Public Affairs Officer in Windhoek, Namibia (2004-2006); Assistant Cultural Affairs Officer for exchanges in Beijing (1997-2000); Information Officer in Kuala Lumpur (1991-1995); Public Affairs Officer in Medan, Sumatra (1987-1990); and several short-term regional geographic desk jobs in Washington.  He has received numerous State Department awards and is fluent in Indonesian, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese.    

    David Wagner is widely acknowledged as one of the world’s leading media and business communication consultants. Over the past 30 years, he has conducted 4,000+ seminars for 450+ organizations in Asia, Europe, North American and the Middle East including Google, Goldman Sachs, Hyundai, Nissan, Oracle, Wal-Mart, and Singapore Airlines. In addition, David has coached more than 250 CEO’s, Presidents, Ambassadors, Billionaires and top government officials. He worked inside the Prime Minister’s Office of Japan during the Fukushima crisis. David has lectured extensively on business communication at a number of institutions including Waseda, Temple and Ochanomizu Universities in Tokyo as well as the Institute of Policy and Management in Singapore. He is currently a lecturer at Denver University’s College of Professional and Continuing Studies. David is also the author of 22 books in Japan on business communication with translations in Japanese, Korean and Chinese. Early in his career, he worked as a reporter in Japan for the Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News. He was also a columnist for the Mainichi Daily News and Daily Yomiuri newspapers in Japan, ASSOCIE magazine in Japan and the Boulder Country Business Report. He also created and hosted two nationally televised 3-month series on NHK on international business skills. David received a Masters Degree from the Monterey Institute of International Studies in California, where he specialized in Japan’s economic and political system.  He received his undergraduate education at the Sorbonne in Paris, Kansai University of Foreign Studies in Osaka and Fort Lewis College in Durango. 


    Career Tracks in Asian Studies

  • [Non-CAS Event] Erika Lee, Rudolph J. Vecoli Chair in Immigration History and Director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota, will present her work on a new (and vast) history of Asian immigration to the U.S.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Michael Pilsbury, Pentagon Consultant and the Director of the Center on Chinese Strategy at the Hudson Institute, Washington DC, was the Assistant Under-Secretary of Defense for Policy Planning during the Reagan administration and Special Assistant for Asian Affairs in the Office of the Secretary of Defense under President George H. W. Bush. He served on the staff of four U.S. Senate Committees from 1978–1984 and 1986-1991 and drafted the Senate Labor Committee version of the legislation that enacted the U.S. Institute of Peace.  Additionally, he assisted in drafting the legislation that created the National Endowment for Democracy and the annual requirement for a DOD report on Chinese military power.

    He is the author of numerous articles and books, including his most recent book The Hundred-Year Marathon: China's Secret Strategy to Replace America as the Global Superpower. Copies will be available to purchase at the lecture.

    The Jackson/Ho China Forum, funded by the William Sharpless Jackson, Jr. Endowment, brings prominent scholars, government officials, business leaders, and other professionals to the University of Denver to address issues related to China and China-U.S. relations. The forum is open to both the University community and the general public.

    To register, please visit http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/forums.html.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] This event will feature traditional Korean music and dance by Lee Mi Sook Dance Company of South Korea. Hosted by National Unification Advisory Council Denver Chapter, sponsored by the Korea Foundation and collaborated by CKA, KSODA CSKA and Center for Asian Studies at CU Boulder.

    In honor of American veterans of the Korean War.

    Schedule of Events:

    Part 1:
    Boochaechoom (Fan Dance)
    Sarangga (Love Song)
    Chang-bu-Taryung (Song of the Professional Entertainer)
    Suljanggo (Solo Drumming)
    Hoesimgok (Song of Conversion)
    Honam Salpuri (Wash Away Evil Spirits)
    Jinju Gyobang Gutgeori Dance

    Break

    Part 2
    Taepyeongmu, “Dance of Peace”
    Gyeonggi Folksong
    Moodangchum (Shaman Dance)
    Gyeonggi Soogunchum (Gyeonggi Towel Dance)
    Ganggangsoollae
    Arirang
    Poongmuaknori

    Parking is available along University Avenue and at Lot 380 (see parking map), as well as at Euclid Autopark. Parking fees may apply. For more information about parking at CU, please visit http://www.colorado.edu/pts/home.


    Dance Arirang


    Map of Old Main

  • [Non-CAS Event] The CU Art Museum is pleased to announce the opening reception of Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art, on Friday, February 13, 2015. The reception is free and open to the public. The exhibition will be on display from February 14 until May 9, 2015.

    Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art explores the tensions between an ancient culture's unbroken artistic tradition and the personality-driven contemporary art world. Historically, Himalayan works of art were used to support the transmission of Buddhism and rarely attributed to the individual artist. The artworks selected for Anonymous reflect how Tibetan artists around the world are examining questions of identity, self-expression and the roles of tradition in an increasingly globalized society.

    The majority of the video works presented in Anonymous were filmed in Lhasa and provide a window onto the current Tibetan experience. Exhibited without attribution, the videos in Anonymous approach themes of identity and self-expression from an alternate vantage point, embracing anonymity as an opportunity for open exploration and the presentation of often-censored imagery.

    In addition to Anonymous, and to highlight developments since its Waves on the Turquoise Lake in 2006 —the first museum exhibition dedicated to contemporary Himalayan art in America—CUAM will exhibit additional contemporary Tibetan works drawn from its permanent collection and loans from CU faculty members.

    Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art is supported by the Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation. Anonymous at the CU Art Museum is supported in part by the HBB Foundation, CU Art Museum members, and CU Boulder Student Arts and Cultural Enrichment (ACE) fees.

    To find out more about Anonymous, please visit http://www.contemporarytibetanart.org/.

  • [Non-CAS Event] What happens when an anthropologist with deep commitments to ethnography in local communities finds her subjects caricatured and catapulted to the center of popular media attention? Can ethnography unsettle the political common sense? In this lecture, anthropologist Lila Abu-Lughod will reflect on the passionate and polarized after-life of her attempt to intervene in debates about Muslim women and their rights. Her latest book, Do Muslim Women Need Saving?, was intended to present alternatives to the highly mediated public production of “the Muslimwoman” through a mix of ethnography and critical analysis. Yet the book was greeted with silence by the targeted U.S. liberal public. Two unanticipated marginal counter-publics took up the book--one with rage and the other with touching and personal affirmation. What can this tell us about public ethnography, and about the paradoxes of transnational feminism?

    Lila Abu-Lughod is the Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University.

    This event is open to the public. Reception to follow. Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology. For more information, contact carla.jones@colorado.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Japanese Program of Asian Languages and Civilizations is hosting a Japanese Calligraphy Workshop on Friday, February 13 from 3:00-5:00 PM in HUMN 250.  Please see the flyer below for more information.

    This event is free and open to the public.


    Japanese Calligraphy Workshop

  • [CAS Speaker Series] China is currently experiencing the most rapid urbanization of any place in history, with plans to relocate 250 million rural villagers into cities over the next two decades. New cities are popping up, seemingly overnight, and rural people are adjusting to a whole new way of life as they move from farmhouses into high-rise apartments and face a life no longer lived off the land. In The Land of Many Palaces co-directors Adam Smith and Song Ting chronicle this transformation in the Inner Mongolian city of Ordos. The film follows a government official who must convince local farmers that their lives will be better off in the city, and a farmer in one of the last remaining villages in the region who is pressured to move.

    Smith will also offer a preview screening his new film, Mountain Town, about the replica Wyoming town of Jackson Hole in Hebei, China.

    Free and open to the public.

    For more information see www.thelandofmanypalaces.com. Visit the film Facebook page at www.facebook.com/landofmanypalaces.

    Parking is available at Euclid Autopark. Parking fees will apply. For more information about parking at CU, please visit http://www.colorado.edu/pts/home.

    The Land of Many Palaces

    Map of Chemistry

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] Ariana Maki will discuss the upcoming exhibition at the CU Art Museum, Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art. In 2006, the CU Art Museum (CUAM) exhibited Waves on the Turquoise Lake, the world’s first museum show dedicated to contemporary Tibetan art, a field that emerged only in the late 1990s. Since then, contemporary art from the Himalayas has become a hotbed of creativity and international attention. Beginning in February, CUAM will host Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art, which highlights photography, painting, sculpture and digital video created since 2008.  This luncheon talk highlights some of the artworks and artists involved in Anonymous, and how they express perspectives on modernization, global culture, the commodification of Buddhism, and the search for the self.

    Ariana Maki is a lecturer in CU's Department of Art and Art History and Department of Religious Studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Art History with a specialization in Buddhist Art. Ariana is also Assistant Curator at Himalayan Art Resources and maintains a research affiliation with the National Library and Archives of Bhutan.

    For more information about this exhibit, visit http://www.contemporarytibetanart.org/.


    Spring 2015 Luncheon Series

  • [Non-CAS Event] Come join us at our first Peace Corps general information session of the semester on Jan. 29, 5:15-7:15 p.m. in UMC room 384. Learn about the application process and how you can make yourself a more competitive Peace Corps applicant. Free food will be provided.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Center for China – U.S. Cooperation will host Dr. Michael Pillsbury at our Jackson/Ho China Forum on Tuesday, January 27, 2015.  He will speak on “China’s Grand Strategy:  the Known and Unknown.”

    Dr. Pillsbury is a Pentagon Consultant and the Director of the Center on Chinese Strategy at the Hudson Institute, Washington D.C. Prior to this, he was the Assistant Under-Secretary of Defense for Policy Planning during the Reagan administration and Special Assistant for Asian Affairs in the Office of the Secretary of Defense under President George H.W. Bush. He served on the staff of four U.S. Senate Committees from 1978-1984 and 1986-1991 and drafted the Senate Labor Committee version of the legislation that enacted the U.S. Institute of Peace. Additionally, he assisted in drafting the legislation that created the national Endowment for Democracy and the annual requirement for the DOD report on Chinese military power.

    He is the author of numerous articles and books. His most recent book is The Hundred-Year Marathon:  China’s Secret Strategy to Replace America as the Global Superpower. Copies will be available to purchase at the lecture.

    The lecture will begin at 12 noon and will be located in Ben Cherrington Hall, Sie 150

    Please register at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/forums.html  by January 20, 2014.

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Ms. Trudy Cohen at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao directly at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This singing competition shows off a wide variety of Japanese song styles and provides an entertaining and interesting view of traditional and modern Japanese vocal music. This year's featured guest is semi-professional enka star Kiyoko Oshiro from Seattle, Washington.

    For more information and details, visit the temple website (http://tsdbt.org/web/) or contact our own member and liasion Stacey Ospina at sospina@aol.com, or 303-915-7499.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Department of Religious Studies at the University of Denver is again hosting their annual “Teaching Islam” Workshop, in conjunction with the Georgetown University Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim Christian Understanding. Teachers, graduate students, and community members are all welcome to participate.

    January 24, 2015, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. — Teaching Islam Workshop:

    This annual, free workshop, open to the University and local community, offers a unique opportunity to develop knowledge of Islam, past and present, as well as to learn practical techniques for teaching about Islam in world history courses, Middle East studies courses and related fields, as well as to prepare for consulting or non-profit work with Muslim communities in the United States and abroad. The workshop will be held in Sturm Hall, room 287. Lunch and refreshments provided. To register, email Professor Andrea L. Stanton by January 22, 2015 at andrea.stanton@du.edu. Please note that you must attend the entire workshop to receive a certificate of completion.

    For more information, please visit: http://www.du.edu/ahss/religiousstudies/news/teachingislam.html.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Andrew Svedlow, Professor of Art History and formerly Dean of the College of Performing and Visual Arts at the University of Northern Colorado, explores the history of the revered rock garden at the Ryoan-ji Temple located in Kyoto, Japan, and the aesthetics which underlie this iconic stone garden. Unfolding the significant connections between aesthetic theories at the time of the creation of the garden and the resonation of those ideas provides some insight into a contemporary sensibility about nature, art, and the place of contemplation in the aesthetic experience. Participants will be encouraged to share their aesthetic and contemplative responses to the visual representation of the garden.

    Doors open at 11:30 am.

    Free for Asian Art Association members; $7 for DAM members; $5 for teachers, students, and docents; $10 public.  AAA & DAM members, please check in at Welcome Desk.  General admission not required for lecture, but is required for gallery access.

    Questions?
    Please contact Beverly Little, blittle@denverartmuseum.org or 720-913-0040, for questions and further details.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Ambassador Christopher Robert Hill is a former career diplomat, a four-time ambassador, nominated by three presidents, whose last post was as Ambassador to Iraq, April 2009 until August 2010.  Prior to Iraq, Hill served as Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 2005 until 2009 during which he was also the head of the U.S. delegation to the Six Party Talks on the North Korean nuclear issue.  Earlier, he was the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea.  Previously he served as U.S. Ambassador to Poland (2000-2004), Ambassador to the Republic of Macedonia (1996-1999) and Special Envoy to Kosovo (1998-1999).  He also served as a Special Assistant to the President and a Senior Director on the staff of the National Security Council, 1999-2000.

    Ambassador Hill received the State Department’s Distinguished Service Award for his contributions as a member of the U.S. negotiating team in the Bosnia peace settlement, and was a recipient of the Robert S. Frasure Award for Peace Negotiations for his work on the Kosovo crisis.

    5:30 Reception

    6:00-7:15 Talk and Q&A

    7:15 Book Signing

    Cost (includes 1 hosted drink ticket per guest)
    $15 Young Professional Members
    $20 WorldDenver Members
    $35 Non-Members
    Free- Corporate/ Academic/ Non Profit- Sponsor Members

    For more information, please contact Jan@WorldDenver.org, or 303-446-4921. Register here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Meet our international exchange group in Denver with the U.S. Department of State's International Visitor Leadership Program, comprised of young political and economic Leaders. They're focused on the theme RISE: Renew, Inspire, Serve and Empower.

    Meet these inspiring visitors and exchange meaningful conversations over tasty international dishes! 

    This event will be pot-luck style so bring your favorite international dish (no pork please), wine or beer.*

    Come socialize, eat, drink and celebrate the holidays.  We look forward to seeing you all there!

    Free for WorldDenver members, and $5 for non-members. For more information, contact Jan@WorldDenver.org, or 303-446-4921. RSVP here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Nepalese Student Association at CU Boulder is proud to present, our first gallery, "A Glimpse of Nepal" featuring an epic documentary "The Desert Eats Us."

    We invite you to attend this Saturday, December 6th at 6pm in University Memorial Center Room 247 for a formal Gallery exhibiting various art pieces, phenomenal photography, and rich crafts all portraying the diversity of Nepal. Come enjoy refreshments and henna tattoos while browsing all Nepal has to offer!

    The Gallery will be followed by a showing of award winning Nepalese film maker Kesang Tseten's documentary "The Desert Eats Us". It gives rare glimpse of the Nepalese migrant worker's experience in Qatar, site of the 2022 World Cup. This critical issue of immigration exploitation is brought to light by moving testimonials of young Nepalese men and women.

    Please feel free to RSVP to get priority seating at the film (which begins at 8pm)! If you are at all interested in every visiting Nepal or would just like to broaden you international horizons, we hope to see you there!

    For more information or to RSVP, please contact ucbnsa@colorado.edu.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] This talk will discuss ethnic identity among Korean-Chinese communities along China’s borders, including the Korean Peninsula and Russia.  These communities have changed significantly due to transnational migration networks. In particular, urban changes due to migration remittances and development will be discussed. Featuring Yinhe Li, Ph.D. student in Geography at Ewha Women's University. Lunch will be provided.

  • [Non-CAS Event] China has a very large number of native plants but only a limited number of these plants appear in traditional Chinese art. The conventions for including plants in traditional Chinese art were very different from the conventions of traditional European art. The symbolism the viewer is expected to understand when viewing plants in Chinese art can be quite different from that of the same plant in a European or American painting. More recent Chinese art is uses more diverse plants. Examples will be drawn from the Denver Art Museum Asian Art collection.

    $5 for teachers and students, $7 DAM members, $10 all other guests.

    Please contact Beverly Little at blittle@denverartmuseum.org, or 720-913-0040 for further details.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The University of Colorado Department of Religious Studies in collaboration with the CU Mediterranean Studies Group and the Program in Jewish Studies presents the 2014 Annual Lester Lecture featuring David Nirenberg, History and the Committee on Social Thought, University of Chicago. David Nirenberg will be giving a talk titled "Sibling Rivalries, Scriptural Communities: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam." This event will be taking place Monday, November 10, 2014 in the British Studies Room at Norlin Library. Reception will be at 5:30pm followed by the lecture at 6:00pm. All are welcome! More information about the lecture and David Nirenberg can be found on our department website: https://rlst.colorado.edu/content/2014-lester-lecture.


    Sibling Rivalries, Scriptural Communities

  • [Non-CAS Event] Explore China's past dynasties as it is revealed in two 18th century painted folding screens. Each was a major workshop commission, being painted with lacquer on lacquer, an extremely difficult artistic technique. As their stories are revealed in this premier viewing of an educational documentary, the hidden messages and ancient techniques used to create these beautiful works of art are revived. It has taken a team of collectors, expert researchers, translators and historians working together for several years to uncover some of their mysteries. Presented by lacquer specialist and documentarian, Carla Stansifer, formerly of the Denver Art Museum, and Cassandra Lohr of China Art Search, LLC. 

    Join Asian Art Association members and their guests for cocktail hour. View a documentary screening about two 18th century Chinese lacquer screens in a private, Denver collection. Explore with experts in the film to learn how and why the beautiful screens were created, and discover their hidden messages. Afterwards, enjoy a light reception and lively discussion with Asian art enthusiasts from all over the Rocky Mountain region.

    Free to all guests. Tickets are required, however.

    Please contact Beverly Little at blittle@denverartmuseum.org, or 720-913-0040 for further details.

  • [Non-CAS Event] On Tuesday, November 4, 2014, the Center for China-U.S. Cooperation will host a panel discussion titled "Sustained Protests in Hong Kong: Economic Prosperity versus Political Participation." Panelists will be Peter Ho, Diane Lee, and Ambassador Chris Hill. Professor Suisheng Zhao will moderate. The panel will take place in Room 301 at the Josef H. Korbel School of International Studies.

    Registration is available online at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/forums.html.

    Please direct questions to Ms. Trudy Cohen at 303-871-4474, or ccusc@du.edu.


    Sustained Protests in Hong Kong

  • [Non-CAS Event] This paper will provide a general introduction to p’ansori, one of Korea’s most well-known and aesthetically complex musical genres. While discussing its performative practices within an historical context, the paper will address the ways in which the ideal “womanhood” has been perpetuated in the art. More specifically, p’ansori provides an interesting case to investigate verbal expressions of gender ideals as both men and women play all characters in any given narrative, creating a transgendered space, while at the same time alternating their physicality, timbre and at times pitch of the voice to distinguish between male and female characters. Thus, by investigating the ways in which gender was constructed during the Chŏsun period (1392-1910), and its affect on p’ansori performance and aesthetics, we can see how the genre was used to educate, create, and maintain notions of ideal womanhood while at the same time creating what I call an androgyny of sound.

    Heather Willoughby is associate professor at the Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea. She received her Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology from Columbia University. Her dissertation and forthcoming book, entitled “The Sound of Han: P’ansori, Timbre, and a South Korean Discourse of Sorrow and Lament,” considers the intersections between practices of sound making and ideologies of emotion. Recent research and publishing efforts focus on gender and image-making issues in Korean popular music and contemporary p’ansori performance practices, as well as diverse topics covering comparative cultures. Having lived in Korea for a total of nearly fifteen years, she is currently employed as a cultural anthropologist and musicologist in the Graduate School of International Studies at Ewha Womans University in Seoul.

    There will be a small reception following this lecture. For more information, please contact Austin Okigbo at Austin.Okigbo@Colorado.edu.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] While the politics of Hindi dominated the language policy debate in India for much of the 20th century, by the turn of the new millennium many scholars were commenting on how the Hindi language question no longer incited the passions that it had in the past. I focus on India's linguistic federalism as one of the major causes of this de-politicization of Hindi. The success of linguistic federalism, I suggest, lies in the language-based democratic-hegemonic bond between emerging regional elites and masses, initially forged in the south of India, later in the Hindi-belt of north India.

    This luncheon series talk will be presented by Selma (Sam) Sonntag, Professor at Humboldt University and Visiting Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. Lunch will be provided.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The International Student and Scholar Association is hosting a Brown Bag event featuring a student panel that will discuss the topic, "Understanding Korean Students Better!" This event will be on Thursday, October 30, from 11:45 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. in the Abrams Lounge. Free refreshments will be provided. For more information, please visit https://cue.colorado.edu/.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The College of Media, Communication and Information would like to invite you to an upcoming talk by Laura Kasinof, a freelance journalist, writer and researcher whose work focuses on the Middle East. Ms. Kasinof reported for the New York Times from Yemen, covering antigovernment protests and conflict as part of the political upheaval unfolding across the Arab world. Her book, "Don't Be Afraid of the Bullets: An Accidental War Correspondent in Yemen," is a critical reflection on her reporting experience and will be out this November from Arcade.

    An Arabic speaker, Ms. Kasinof has been featured on TV and radio outlets like BBC News, NPR and Al Jazeera. She has written for the Washington Monthly, Guernica, the Economist, the San Francisco Chronicle, Foreign Policy, the Christian Science Monitor, Warscapes, and the Cairo Review for Global Affairs, among others. Her work has been supported by the Fund for Investigative Journalism and the International Center for Journalists.

    This event is co-sponsored by the College of Media, Communication and Information, and the Center for Media, Religion and Culture. 

    Don't be Afraid of the Bullets

  • [Non-CAS Event] In collaboration with the Leeds School of Business, Office of International Education, and International Student and Scholar Programs, the Career Services Office will be hosting the “Launching Your Global Career” career panel and interactive workshop.

    Students will have the opportunity to hear from others who have benefited from international experiences, learn how to be competitive in the globalized world, discover how to make a global career a reality, and meet other students with similar interests. This event is for U.S. and international students interested in global careers, in the U.S. and abroad.

    Speakers include:

    • Antonio Papuzza - Instructor of Management and Entrepreneurship, Leeds School of Business
    • Aga Sypniewska - International Employment Program Manager, CU Career Services
    • Katie Goldberg - CU Study Abroad Alumna and International Educator, International Studies Abroad
    • Karina Sevcik Gabaldon - 2013 International Student Graduate, CU Boulder

    Snacks and refreshments will be provided.

  • [CAS Event] The Center of Asian Studies joins with the Department to bring this Geography Colloquium Series event. The violent protests in Lhasa in 2008 against Chinese rule were met by disbelief and anger on the part of Chinese citizens and state authorities, perplexed by Tibetans’ apparent ingratitude for the generous provision of development. In Taming Tibet, Emily T. Yeh examines how Chinese development projects in Tibet served to consolidate state space and power. Drawing on sixteen months of ethnographic fieldwork between 2000 and 2009, Yeh traces how the transformation of the material landscape of Tibet between the 1950s and the first decade of the twenty-first century has often been enacted through the labor of Tibetans themselves. Focusing on Lhasa, Yeh shows how attempts to foster and improve Tibetan livelihoods through the expansion of markets and the subsidized building of new houses, the control over movement and space, and the education of Tibetan desires for development have worked together at different times and how they are experienced in everyday life.

    The master narrative of the PRC stresses generosity: the state and Han migrants selflessly provide development to the supposedly backward Tibetans, raising the living standards of the Han’s “little brothers.” Arguing that development is in this context a form of “indebtedness engineering,” Yeh depicts development as a hegemonic project that simultaneously recruits Tibetans to participate in their own marginalization while entrapping them in gratitude to the Chinese state. The resulting transformations of the material landscape advance the project of state territorialization. Exploring the complexity of the Tibetan response to—and negotiations with—development, Taming Tibet focuses on three key aspects of China’s modernization: agrarian change, Chinese migration, and urbanization. Yeh presents a wealth of ethnographic data and suggests fresh approaches that illuminate the Tibet Question."


    Taming Tibet

    Guggenheim Map

  • [Non-CAS Event] Learn more about graduate studies at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center at an information session on Wednesday, October 22, 12:00-1:00 p.m., in Humanities 230. The programs offered at the center include a Graduate Certificate in Chinese and American Studies; a Masters of Arts in International Studies; and an HNC Certificate/SAIS M.A., which is held in both Nanjing and in Washington D.C.

    If you cannot make it to the information session, schedule an appointment with an admissions representative. For more information, email Sallie Ly at sallie.ly@jhu.edu, or visit http://www.nanjing.jhu.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This event is put on by Translingua and CU Career Services and will be both a panel and networking event where students will have the opportunity to hear from professionals in the translation industry and ask questions of the professionals. The roundtable discussion will provide insight into career opportunities in translation and interpreting, best practices in training for a career in the language industry, and much more!

    The panelist include:
    Nicole Michel, Co-President at Translingua Associates, Inc. a specialized translation company with offices in Boulder and New York City. She holds a BA in Translation from the Zürich School of Translation and Interpretation, Switzerland.
    Tonya Johnson, Spanish translator, interpreter and editor.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Global Seminar: Shanghai: Window on China. Attend this new summer Global Seminar in Shanghai, conducted by History Professor Timothy B. Weston and offered by Study Abroad, the Center For Asian Studies and the Tang Fund. Explore Shanghai’s uniquely important role in modern Chinese history and gain a strong appreciation for both the content of modern Chinese history and for how that history is remembered and made use of in China today. Selected participants will receive a generous scholarship funded by the Tang Fund and the Center for Asian Studies.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] Over the past decade, urban development has been central to China’s aspirations of becoming a global economic and political power. Cities with significant Muslim populations have, in this context, become crucial nodes linking China and the Middle East. This talk by Yang Yang, Ph.D. student in the Department of Geography, focuses on urban development in cities along this “new Silk Road,” and seeks to understand the role of Hui Muslims and Islam in the production of spectacular Islamic-themed urban landscapes, and the extent to which the Hui are perceived as resources in China’s efforts to build relationships with global Islamic financiers.

    CAS Luncheon Series Fall 2014

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The University of Colorado Boulder is once again a local partner for the annual CHINA Town Hall event. CHINA Town Hall is a national day of programming on China involving about 70 cities throughout the United States. This year's national webcast features President Jimmy Carter. After the webcast program, Lionel Jensen, Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Notre Dame, will be our on-site speaker.

    Jimmy Carter (James Earl Carter, Jr.), 39th president of the United States, was born on October 1, 1924, in the small farming town of Plains, Georgia, and grew up in nearby Archery. His father was a farmer and businessman and his mother was a registered nurse.

    He was educated in the public schools of Plains, and attended Georgia Southwestern College and the Georgia Institute of Technology before graduating from the United States Naval Academy in 1946. He became a submariner, serving in both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets and rising to the rank of lieutenant. Chosen for the nuclear submarine program, he studied reactor technology and nuclear physics at Union College in Schenectady, NY, and served as senior officer of the pre-commissioning crew of the Seawolf, the second nuclear submarine.

    On July 7, 1946, he married Rosalynn Smith of Plains. After his father died in 1953, he resigned his naval commission and returned to Georgia. He took over the Carter farms, and he and Rosalynn operated Carter’s Warehouse, a general-purpose seed and farm supply company in Plains. He served on county boards supervising education, the hospital authority, and the library. In 1962 he won election to the Georgia Senate. He lost his first gubernatorial campaign in 1966, but won the next election, becoming Georgia’s 76th governor in January 1971.

    In December 1974, he announced his candidacy for president of the United States, and was elected president on November 2, 1976. He counts among his administration’s significant foreign policy accomplishments the Panama Canal treaties, the Camp David Accords, the peace treaty between Egypt and Israel, the SALT II treaty with the Soviet Union, and the establishment of U.S. diplomatic relations with the People’s Republic of China. He championed human rights throughout the world. On the domestic side, the administration’s achievements included a comprehensive energy program conducted by a new Department of Energy; deregulation in energy, transportation, communications, and finance; major educational programs under a new Department of Education; and major environmental protection legislation, including the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act.

    In 1982, President Carter became University Distinguished Professor at Emory University in Atlanta, and founded The Carter Center to address national and international public policy issues, working to resolve conflict, promote democracy, protect human rights, and prevent disease. The permanent facilities of The Carter Presidential Center were dedicated in October 1986, and include the Jimmy Carter Library and Museum, administered by the National Archives.

    President Carter is the author of 28 books, most recently A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power, published in April 2014.

    On December 10, 2002, the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to Mr. Carter “for his decades of untiring effort to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts, to advance democracy and human rights, and to promote economic and social development.”

    Lionel M. Jensen is associate professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Notre Dame, and faculty fellow of the Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies and of the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.
    His research is identified closely with the intellectual history of “Confucianism”; however, his interests and published work extend from ancient, through medieval, modern and even contemporary topics. He has conducted research on Chinese religion and thought, contemporary economy and politics, human rights, folklore, early Sino-western contact, popular cults, comparative mythology, nationalism and the culture industry.

    Professor Jensen is author of Manufacturing Confucianism: Chinese Traditions and Universal
    Civilization (1997), recognized in 1998 as the Best First Book in the History of Religions by the American Academy of Religion. In addition, Jensen has edited or co-edited five other books: China In and Beyond the Headlines (2012), China’s Transformations: the Stories beyond the Headlines (2007), China Off Center: Readings on the Margin of the Middle Kingdom (2002), China Beyond the Headlines (2000), and Early China 20 (1997). He is currently completing his latest book, Enchanting Texts: The Mythistories of Confucianism, while working on another, Muscular Confucianism: Politics and “Culturetainment” in China’s Soft Power Experiment.

    For more than two decades, Dr. Jensen has taught courses in Chinese history, religion, philosophy, politics, and society at Notre Dame, the University of Colorado, and the University of Pennsylvania, and has been recognized for his achievements in teaching. In 2010 he received Notre Dame’s Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C. Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

    Professor Jensen received his B.A. in history from Williams College, his M.A. in Asian Studies from Washington University, and his Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies, the National Committee on United States-China Relations, and the Carter Center.


    CHINA Town Hall


    Map of Humanities

  • [Non-CAS Event] Details to be announced.  Visit us on Facebook to get regular updates.

    $5 for teachers and students, $7 DAM members, $10 all other guests.

    Please contact Beverly Little at blittle@denverartmuseum.org, or 720-913-0040 for further details.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This lecture focuses on the remarkable evidence for early metal works excavated by Dr. Vincent Pigott, an anthropologist and archaeologist with a strong interest in the origins, transmission and societal impact of metallurgy across Eurasia. In Thailand, just north of Bangkok a pair of unique, prehistoric villages found by Dr. Pigott and his team together comprise one of the largest regional copper production centers known anywhere in eastern Asia. From where did this all-important technology come - India - China - or perhaps beyond?

    Dr. Vincent C. Pigott is currently a Consulting Scholar in the Asian Section, University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia and resides in the Denver area. He holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn and, as an archaeologist, is focused on the prehistory and archaeometallurgy of mainland Southeast Asia. He maintains a strong interest in the origins, transmission and societal impact of metallurgy across Eurasia and it is in this context  that  he  continues  to  expand  his  research  into  the  reciprocal  interactions  of technology and culture.

    Cost:
    ~free to AAA members
    ~$5 for teachers/students 
    ~$7 for DAM members
    ~$10 all other guests

    Ticketing
    For tickets, please visit the Denver Art Museum web site.

    Questions?
    Please contact Beverly Little at blittle@denverartmuseum.org, or call 720-913-0040 for questions and further details.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Join the Center for Asian Studies as we hold a forum discussion on the recent protests in Hong Kong. Panelists will offer an analysis of the protests, including the historical background of the protests, the contemporary context of the protests, and present-day Hong Kong and Chinese relations. Panelists include Tim Oakes, Professor of Geography and Director of the Center for Asian Studies; Timothy Weston, Associate Professor of History and Associate Director of the Center for Asian Studies; and Yang Yang, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Geography.

    The Hong Kong Protest Movement

    Map of Humanities

  • [Non-CAS Event] Since 2012, when South Korean rapper PSY’s “Gangnam Style” dominated US airwaves, the popularity of K-Pop has created renewed interest amongst American media outlets and netizens in the topic of South Korean plastic surgery consumption. By examining both the “Miss Korea gif” and PSY’s “Gangnam Style” alongside one another, this talk situates South Korean beauty practices and pop culture within the broader context of South Korea’s neocolonial relationship to the United States (and postcolonial relationship with Japan). This talk locates South Korean beauty between two empires and at the intersection of social media, global pop culture and neoliberalism. Sponsored by CU Denver Asian American Student Services, Korea Club and Asian Student Alliance. For more information, please contact soyon.bueno@ucdenver.edu.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Elegant, courtly representations of nature and seasons fill a wide range of Japanese genres and media—from poetry and prose fiction to screen paintings, tea ceremony, flower arrangement, and annual observances. Haruo Shirane shows how, when, and why this occurred and the manner in which it intersected with a non-aristocratic representations of farm villages and rural landscape to create the complex cultural landscape we have today in Japan.

    Haruo Shirane is Shincho Professor of Japanese Literature and Culture at Columbia University. He is the author and editor of numerous books on Japanese literature, including Traces of Dreams: Landscape, Cultural Memory, and the Poetry of Basho. This lecture is based on his latest book: Japan and the Culture of the Four Seasons: Nature, Literature, and the Arts (Columbia University Press).

    Sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, the Graduate Committee on the Arts and Humanities, and the Center for Asian Studies.


    Japan and the Culture of the Four Seasons

    Map of Humanities

     

  • [CAS Event] The Center of Asian Studies joins with the Department to bring this Geography Colloquium Series event. Architects around the world covet the credibility offered by websites that cast design recognition globally. But in many countries, architects’ peers and clients do not distinguish between substantive and superficial forms of credibility. In this presentation, Shawhin Roudbari shares evidence that suggests how the ambiguity between these two forms of recognition results in a destabilization of professional authority in architects’ home countries. By tracking transnational practices of architects from Iran, he considers the pervasiveness of the destabilization of authority in the design professions in even the most politically and professionally isolated countries. He combines a content analysis of design websites, as a preeminent transnational medium, with in-depth interviews with Iranian architects. In this presentation, he will bring attention to the tremendous agency that informal actors and their entrepreneurial practices have in the transnationalization of professions so that we may better understand the actors and processes driving the global transformation of design practice.

    Transnational Credibility

    Map of Guggenheim

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Open to all majors, Career Tracks in Asian Studies will introduce you to professionals with Asian expertise who work in international business and in organizations that build local connections with Asia. Come learn how you can apply your Asian interests in a global career!

    Jeffrey King is the International Business Manager for the Asia-Pacific Region for the Colorado International Trade Office (ITO), a division of the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade (OEDIT). As the Asia-Pacific business manager, Jeff helps promote the export of Colorado goods and services to the countries in the region. He also focuses on attracting investment from the region to Colorado. Prior to joining OEDIT, Jeff worked in the intellectual property business. He has a master’s degree in international relations from Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China, and he received his bachelor's degree from the University of Colorado Boulder in History.

    Pam Reichert is the Vice President of the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation. She has over 25 years of international finance, national security, and business development experience. She assists with the EDC’s annual strategic plan, manages the budget, and coordinates marketing and prospect recruitment missions in the U.S. and internationally. She played leadership roles to bring a regional US Patent and Trademark Office to Denver, to coordinate the Tokyo-Denver inaugural flight and mission with community partners, and brought the National Site Selectors Annual Conference to Denver in 2014 to market the region and build relationships with these globally recognized consultants. Prior to joining the EDC, Pam led international trade and investment efforts at the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade under former Governor Bill Ritter Jr. She developed new export promotion programs supporting Colorado’s start up businesses in the cleantech sector and secured federal funding for them. Pam organized Governor-led trade and investment missions to Canada, Japan, China, and Spain, supporting Colorado exports and marketing Colorado’s energy and bioscience sectors to potential investors and partners. Earlier in her career, she was an analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency, an associate at Salomon Smith Barney in Latin American equity research and marketing to institutional investors, and led global country risk management at CoBank, later taking on portfolio management responsibilities for Europe, the Middle East and Africa where she grew the portfolio to $950 million from $600 million within two years by developing new markets, including Russia and Kazakhstan. Her career has taken her to travel and work in Mexico, South America, Africa, Europe, the Middle East, Japan, China and South East Asia. She currently serves on the boards of the World Trade Center, CO-LABS (a consortia representing the 30 federal laboratories in Colorado), and the Economic Development Council of Colorado, a state-wide non-profit dedicated to the interests of business and the economic development community, where she serves on the executive committee and as treasurer. Pam has a B.A. in International Studies and French from Bowling Green State University and an M.A. in West European Studies from Indiana University. She has had professional training in accounting, financial analysis, leadership, and exporting.

    Julie Segraves, Executive Director of the Asian Art Coordinating Council, a non-profit art organization. Segraves is also a representative for Bonhams, an international auction house. Segraves has a master’s degree in East Asian Studies with a major in Chinese art and language, a minor in Japanese art and language, and has worked in the Asian art and the museum fields for over three decades. She has a vast network of international, national, and local art connections and has juried numerous exhibits. Segraves first worked for the Denver Art Museum and the University of Colorado Museum before becoming the AACC Executive Director. Segraves is also a Foreign Expert at Beijing University’s Art and Archaeology department, has been a professor at University of Denver’s University College, as well as an Asian art appraiser for Antiques Roadshow. She has given numerous lectures on art history, collecting, and appraising. Segraves has expertise in both historical and contemporary Asian art and has written articles on these topics for numerous Asian art publications and exhibit catalogues. To date she has curated 50 Asian art exhibitions and has organized their travel to US museums and non-profit galleries. Julie has a B.A. from Purdue University, an M.A. from the University of Denver, and another M.A. from the University of Indiana, with coursework at National Taiwan University in Chinese art and language, Japanese art and language, and Asian Studies.

    Career Tracks in Asian Studies


    Map of Hale

  • [Non-CAS Event] Representatives from Columbia University, Johns Hopkins University, Georgetown University, Princeton University, and Tufts University will be present to discuss academic programs, admission requirements, financial aid, and career opportunities for students with graduate degrees in international affairs.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The Center for Asian Studies and the International Film Series present screenings of two Korean films and a public lecture by two distinguished professors of Korean film studies.

    Oldboy (2003), directed by Park Chan-wook, will be shown on Thursday, October 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Visual Arts Complex (VAC) Auditorium.

    The Host (2006), directed by Bong Joon-ho, will be shown on Friday, October 3 at 7:30 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium.

    The Host will be preceded by a public lecture by Hye Seung Chung, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies at Colorado State University, and David Scott Diffrient, Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies at Colorado State University. The lecture, "The Politics of Transnational Korean Genre Films: Park Chan-wook's Oldboy​ and Bong Joon-Ho's The Host," will be held Friday, October 3 at ​6:00 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium.

    Parking is available at Euclid AutoPark at Broadway and Euclid (hourly rate). For a map of Euclid, please click here. For more information about parking, please click here.

     

    Korean Film Series

    Map of Muenzinger

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The Center for Asian Studies and the International Film Series present screenings of two Korean films and a public lecture by two distinguished professors of Korean film studies.

    Oldboy (2003), directed by Park Chan-wook, will be shown on Thursday, October 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Visual Arts Complex (VAC) Auditorium.

    The Host (2006), directed by Bong Joon-ho, will be shown on Friday, October 3 at 7:30 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium.

    The Host will be preceded by a public lecture by Hye Seung Chung, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies at Colorado State University, and David Scott Diffrient, Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies at Colorado State University. The lecture, "The Politics of Transnational Korean Genre Films: Park Chan-wook's Oldboy​ and Bong Joon-Ho's The Host," will be held Friday, October 3 at ​6:00 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium.

    Parking is available at Euclid AutoPark at Broadway and Euclid (hourly rate). For a map of Euclid, please click here. For more information about parking, please click here.

     

    Korean Film Series

    Map of Muenzinger

  • [Non-CAS Event] Lodi Gyaltsen Gyari will be the Jackson/Ho China forum speaker on Thursday, October 2 from 5:00-6:30 pm in Sie 150 of Ben Cherrington Hall. He will discuss, “Negotiating the Future of Tibet: An Insider’s Story.”

    Lodi Gyaltsen Gyari is a Non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in the Foreign Policy program and is a Research Scholar in Asian Studies at Georgetown University. He is Executive Chairman of the International Campaign for Tibet, as well as Chairman of the Conservancy for Trans-Himalayan Art and Culture and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Mr. Gyari served as Special Envoy of His Holiness the Dalai Lama from 1990 until 2012 and is regarded as a pioneering figure in introducing and establishing a culture of democracy and modernity into the exiled Tibetan community.

    More information and registration can be found at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/forums.

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact ccusc@du.edu. You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Dr. Mutsumi Moteki, a co-editor of the newly published Japanese Art Song Anthology (by Classical Vocal Reprints) will introduce you to Japanese Art Song written in the style of Western classical music. 

    You will learn when and how Western music arrived in Japan. 

    You will also discover how easy it is to sing in Japanese.

    Free and open to the public.

  • [Non-CAS Event] There has until recently been little published in English or Thai about Bencharong, yet it was made in China in the 18th and early 19th centuries exclusively for Siamese royalty. In his presentation, Paul Bromberg will explore the history, production, usage and forms of this little-known, yet vibrant and colorful, export ceramic ware, drawing on examples from his own collection and the Ring Collection in Oslo, Norway, the largest repository of Bencharong outside Thailand which was the subject of a recent exhibition and accompanying catalog written by a team of twelve well-known international scholars.

    $5 for teachers and students, $7 DAM members, $10 all other guests.

    Please contact Beverly Little at blittle@denverartmuseum.org, or 720-913-0040 for further details.


    Bencharong: Royal Porcelain of Siam

    Bowl with lid, ceramic. Photo by Eddie Siu and courtesy of Paul Bromberg.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The Center for Asian Studies and the International Film Series present screenings of two Korean films and a public lecture by two distinguished professors of Korean film studies.

    Oldboy (2003), directed by Park Chan-wook, will be shown on Thursday, October 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Visual Arts Complex (VAC) Auditorium.

    The Host (2006), directed by Bong Joon-ho, will be shown on Friday, October 3 at 7:30 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium.

    The Host will be preceded by a public lecture by Hye Seung Chung, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies at Colorado State University, and David Scott Diffrient, Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies at Colorado State University. The lecture, "The Politics of Transnational Korean Genre Films: Park Chan-wook's Oldboy​ and Bong Joon-Ho's The Host," will be held Friday, October 3 at ​6:00 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium.

    Parking is available at Euclid AutoPark at Broadway and Euclid (hourly rate). For a map of Euclid, please click here. For more information about parking, please click here.

     

    Korean Film Series

    Map of Muenzinger

  • [Non-CAS Event] Please come to Boren Fellowship information meeting for graduate students on Thursday, Oct. 2, at 4 p.m. in C4C N215. Learn about Boren Fellowship grants for international study and research. Boren Awards provide unique funding opportunities for U.S. students to study in Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America and the Middle East. Boren Fellowships provide up to $30,000 for language study and international research.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The relatively recent U.S. "pivot" to Asia is not all about China. From the release of the Nobel Peace Prize Winner Ang San Suu Kyi in Myanmar to Filipino and Vietnamese disputes with China over territorial claims in the South China Sea to the increasing prominence of ASEAN, Southeast Asia is rising in the world.

    Representing the United States in these countries is one thing, but what is it like working as a European diplomat in these countries? Particularly if you're from Belgium, which hosts both the EU and NATO? Please join Ambassador Rudi Veestraeten, current Consul General to Los Angeles for the Kingdom of Belgium, for a first-hand account of his extensive diplomatic experience in Southeast Asia.

    Please visit www.ceuce.com for more information and to register.

  • [CAS Brown Bag] To mitigate the threats global wildlife trade has on biodiversity loss, a comprehensive approach is needed to address every link on the trade chain, from poaching to trafficking to demand. Highlighting the successes and challenges of campaigns to reduce the trade in endangered species in China, the presentation argues for behavior change communication strategies to reduce both the supply of and the demand for wildlife parts and products. To reduce supply required strengthened international and national laws and policies. To reduce demand needs public outreach campaigns to increase consumer knowledge, shift attitudes and change behavior.

    Grace Ge Gabriel, Asia Regional Director, International Fund for Animal Welfare, has been leading wildlife conservation and animal welfare campaigns for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (www.IFAW.org) in China since 1997. Under her leadership, IFAW's campaigns to reduce commercial exploitation of wildlife have resulted in enhanced policies to make marketplaces unavailable for wildlife trade, increased law enforcement against wildlife crime, and changed consumer attitudes and behavior to reject parts and products from endangered wildlife. A native of China, Grace received degrees in Communications and worked in media outlets both in China and the USA.

    This is part of the Anthropology Brown Bag series.

    Reducing Elephant Ivory and Rhino Horn Trade in China


    Map of Hale

  • [Non-CAS Event] Panel Discussion with Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies, University of Oklahoma; Steven Heydemann, Vice President of Applied Research on Conflict, United States Institute of Peace; and Marwa Daoudy, Assistant Professor of International Studies, Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, Georgetown University.

    Free and open to the public.

    Co-sponsored by the Conflict Resolution Institute at the University of Denver and the Aspen Institute's Middle East Programs.

    For background reading, visit the resource page at http://www.du.edu/korbel/middleeast/sectarianism.html.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Andrew Quintman of Yale University will visit CU Boulder on Wednesday, October 1st to deliver a lecture on "The Making of Milarepa: Reading and Writing the Life of Tibet's Great Saint." Late in the eleventh century a wandering mendicant, the Yogin, starved himself in the frigid mountains of southern Tibet while undertaking ascetic practice. He was later recognized as a buddha famed for his poetry and songs of spiritual realization. Four hundred years later, a tantric adept emerged from the jungles of Tibet’s borderlands, naked, human entrails wound in his dangling dreadlocks. This adept, the Madman, composed a new and novelistic version of the Yogin’s life. The story it told of a great Tibetan saint would inspire new forms of religious literature across the Himalayan world, new styles of artistic production, new traditions of spiritual practice. In time, the Madman’s version of the Yogin’s life would become Tibet’s most famous book. In this lecture, Andrew Quintman explores the extraordinary life story of Yogin Milarepa composed by Madman Tsangnyön Heruka, tracing its historical formation, changing narrative voices, and enduring legacy across the region. Drawing on his recent book, The Yogin and the Madman: Reading the Biographical Corpus of Tibet’s Great Saint Milarepa, he presents a new way of reading The Life of Milarepa by foregrounding the unique relationship between Yogin and Madman together with the processes through which the narrative took shape.

    Andrew Quintman is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Yale University, specializing in the Buddhist traditions of Tibet and the Himalaya. His areas of teaching and research include Buddhist literature and history, sacred geography and pilgrimage, and visual cultures of the wider Himalayan region. He is author of The Yogin and the Madman: Reading the Biographical Corpus of Tibet’s Great Saint Milarepa (Columbia University Press, 2014) and translator of the new English translation of The Life of Milarepa, published by Penguin Classics in 2010.

    There will be a reception with Professor Quintman before his lecture at 3:30pm at the CU Art Museum. In tandem with his lecture, the CU Art Museum will be hosting an art exhibit by the Lhasa artist Gade on the theme of "pechas" or Tibetan texts, in which Gade creates surreal modern landscapes on traditional manuscript paper. Prior to the lecture, at 4:30pm, anyone is invited to visit the third floor of Norlin Library for a tour of our library display on Tibetan textual production and its translation and transmission to the West. The lecture takes place in the British Studies Room on the fifth floor of Norlin. The lecture will take place at 5pm in the British Studies Room on the 5th floor of Norlin Library. It is free and open to the public. 

    These events celebrate the Tsadra "Translation and Transmission" Conference in Keystone, Colorado on October 2-5th. CAS is a partner for the conference.


    The Making of Milarepa


    Map of Library

  • [Non-CAS Event] Sun Hao is a modern Chinese ink painter, trained in traditional techniques with an emphasis in creating his own stye. His paintings are inspired by traditional culture, a piece of childhood memory or a recent trip. His unlimited choice of subjects is in keeping with the unrestrained style as valued by ancient Chinese painters. In most cases, Sun is not interested in exemplifying the collective mindset of the literati class but wants to focus on the living conditions or the growth path of those around him. He will be presenting his work on Tuesday, September 30, at 6:30 p.m. in the VAC auditorium.

    For more information please contact Valerie Albicker at 303-492-2539 or albicker@colorado.edu.

    Sun Hao

  • [CAS Speaker Series] On September 29, 2014, the College of Music, University of Colorado, Boulder will hold a lecture and concert event featuring Malek Jandali, an American-Syrian composer and pianist who uses his art to highlight the atrocities in the ongoing Syrian conflict, invoke the principles of human rights, and to advocate for international aid. The event is open to the public and is designed as both academic and community education initiative on global affairs.

    Mr. Jandali’s presentation will be two-part. First he will give a one-hour lecture as part of the musicology and music theory colloquium series that will center on the current conflict situation in Syria and how he makes compositional choices in response to the conflict. Second he will give a 75 minute performance and discussion-based concert on his newest compositions for piano, cello and clarinet as well as his seminal work “Echoes from Ugarit,” which is his interpretation of a Hurrian clay musical script (dated 1400 to 2000 B.C. discovered in Ugarit, Syria 1950), known to be the oldest music notation in the world.

    Recognized as a leading figure in today's piano world, Malek Jandali’s musical career as a concert pianist began in 1988 after winning the National Young Artists' competition followed by the 1997 "Outstanding Musical Performer Award" in the United States. As a prolific composer, his works have been performed with several leading orchestras around the world such as the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, the Moscow Symphony, the Cairo Symphony, and the Ludwig Symphony Orchestra. He has also been a frequent guest on National Public Radio (NPR), Radio France Musique, and has featured on CNN, BBC, and PBS etc.

    Malek Jandali has been successful in disseminating his message of peace and human rights using the medium of the recording industry. In effect he has received several awards including the 2011 "Freedom of Expression" award in Los Angeles for his song "Watani Ana - I am my Homeland", as well as his activism in the Arab Spring movement; the Arab-American Cultural Achievement Award in New York City; and the 2013 GUSI Peace Prize for his dedication to peace and humanitarian causes.

    The event is hosted by the musicology department in collaboration with other units from within and outside of the university, including the department of anthropology, the department of arts and art history, and the United Nations Association, Boulder County. It is sponsored by the College of Music, the Graduate Committee on the Arts and Humanities, the Center for Asian Studies, and the Office of International Education.

    Event Schedule:
    2:00pm -Colloquium Lecture, Chamber Hall, followed by reception and more roundtable discussion
    7:30pm- Concert, Chamber Hall

    Contact Information:
    Austin C. Okigbo, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, CU Boulder
    Phone: 303-492-6439; e-mail: austin.okigbo@colorado.edu

    Kelsey Thibdeau, Doctoral Candidate, CU Boulder
    Phone: 518-727-0656; e-mail: kelsey.michie@colorado.edu

    A Note on the Multi-Disciplinary Relevance of Malek Jandali’s Work and Visit
    - Austin Okigbo

    One might wonder why a classical composer and pianist would interest those in Anthropology and Art History.
    Malek Jandali’s work, especially his Echoes from Ugarit is a rare example of the convergence of archeology, history, politics, and music. The Hurian clay musical script (dated 14000 to 2000 B.C. discovered in Ugarit, Syria 1950) is known to be the oldest music notation in the world. Mr. Jandali is the first Syrian composer to set the script to modern symphonic arrangement. By doing so, first he provides us an opportunity to appreciate what this music sounds like at least in its melodic and modal form. Second, he brings both the ancient and contemporary human music culture into one sequence of artistic expression.

    Talk about interdisciplinary interests and Malek Jandali’s work comprises a scholarly road junction, where archeologists, art historians, and ethnomusicologists meet and interact.

    On a more specific note on global affairs, Jandali’s work and humanitarian project is timely in the light of the current problem in Syria and the Middle East at large. The event will afford the university faculty and students and the larger Boulder community the opportunity to engage an individual whose personal life has been impacted on many levels by the Syrian situation and the events of the Arab Spring, and how his experience of the events find expression in his music.


    Syrian Peace Advocacy


    Map of IMIG Music

  • [Non-CAS Event] A Kurdish delegation will visit the University of Colorado Boulder campus Sept. 29 and 30 to deliver a public talk on the political situation in the Kurdistan region of Iraq and receive an electronic copy of important documents captured by Kurdish rebels in 1991 but removed from Iraq for safekeeping and analysis.

    The collection has been part of the University of Colorado Libraries Archives and Special Collections since early 1998 when 18 metric tons of documents were transferred to CU-Boulder from the National Archives with the approval of the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee. At the same time, Montgomery obtained an electronic copy of the 5.5-million-page collection from the Defense Intelligence Agency’s Documentation Exploitation Division, which had scanned the documents for intelligence.

    Members of the delegation coming to CU-Boulder include Woshiar Rasul Mohammed Amin, adviser to the Sulaimaniyah governor and former member of the Sulaimaniyah Provincial Council; Professor Ferdinand Hennerbichler, faculty of languages and humanities at the University of Sulaimaniyah and a former Austrian diplomat; Mohammed Fatah Mohammed, member of the General Directorate for Culture, Sport and Youth of the Sulaimaniyah Governorate; and Ako M. Wahbi, international board member of the Zheen Archive Center, where the repatriated files will be housed.

    The four delegates will speak at a talk, “The Future of the Kurds and Iraq: Confronting the Threat of ISIS,” on Monday, September 29, at 7 p.m. The campus event, hosted by the Conference on World Affairs Athenaeum, is free and open to the public but attendees must pre-register on a first-come, first-served basis at www.cwarsvp.com while space is available.

    See more at: http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2014/09/22/visiting-kurdish-delegation-receive-iraqi-secret-police-documents-cu#sthash.nNS5ZqRb.dpuf

  • [Non-CAS Event] The members of the Association for India's Development (AID) - Colorado Chapter would like to cordially invite you to the event "Boulder Dandiya 2014". The event is the third edition of the annual fundraiser organized by us to mark the Indian festive season of Navratri. We bring to you, your very own version of a traditional Dandiya night, right here in Boulder. Come enjoy learning the traditional dance form Dandiya and groove to the Bollywood songs to give a perfect ending to the night! :)

    We will also have delicious Indian food! All proceeds go to sustainable projects in India.

    Entry for students is free!! RSVP here for discount on food!
    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boulder-dandiya-2014-indian-dance-night-tickets-13148709143.


    Dandiya '14

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Korean American Community Foundation in Colorado (KACFC) will hold two talks as part of its annual education event. This event is on Saturday, September 27 from 10:00 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.

    “Korea Goes Global: The Unexpected Rise of an Economic and Cultural Powerhouse" will be presented by Professor Tony Robinson at UC Denver. He will talk about the meteoric rise of Korea to world cultural and economic prominence, including some reflection on how Seoul has become a leading world-city, a city that represents and is producing the leading economic and cultural forms of our era. Also his presentation will include Korean culture more broadly and  the place of Korean culture in current global dynamics such things as K-Pop, Hallyu, Korea's high-tech fascination, and Korea's growing economic power.

    “The Origin of Korean Language, Hangul” will be introduced by KACFC steering committee. How was Hangul invented?, How does the written Korean, Hangul work?, and Greatness of Hangul will be presented with K-drama and Korean history.

    For the event agenda, please click here.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] In the contemporary world, most of us move from one place to another and experience placelessness, the difficulty of building deep knowledge of and relationship with the specific culture or place we migrated to. Today’s nomadic culture and lifestyle is multicultural, transcending geographic locations and ethnic characteristics. Such experiences lead us to re-perceive our sense of identity. Engaging issues of Korean diaspora and cultural displacement, my current creative work What’s Your Name? investigates how Korean immigrants in the United States understand their sense of cultural identity. Cultural identity reflects the society's collective belief and value, and the names are part of cultural identity. Names—ethnic or adopted—as well as naming practice are critical keys to comprehending how they redefine, reform, or reject their cultural identity. As a visual artist, I carry out an interview project and a series of photographs embodying Korean immigrants' stories and emotional resonances.

    This Luncheon Series talk will be presented by Joo Yeon Woo, Assistant Professor in the Department of Art and Art History.


    CAS Luncheon Series Fall 2014

  • [Non-CAS Event] EDventure is a Social Development and Leadership organization. Our 3-week summer programs allow students to work in Educational and Health Based humanitarian projects in Cambodia and South Africa, and projects dedicated to working with endangered wildlife in Costa Rica and Thailand. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for students to make a measurable, and sustainable impact on a community they probably didn’t even know existed, and broaden their global perspective.

    EDventure will be hosting meetings all day on Thursday, September 25 in the UMC. For more information, please visit http://www.edventureintl.com/.


    EDventure

  • [Non-CAS Event] The museum is hosting a talk by Dr. Robert Pontsioen from the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History titled, " Cultured Warriors: The Enduring Legacy of the Samurai in Japanese Society"; the talk will be accompanied by free Japanese food and a live music and dance performance.

    This event will accompany the now open Anthropology Hall exhibit, What in the World?: Samurai that features Japanese swords, artwork, helmet and mask.

    Please come for the cultural experience, the interesting talk, and to support your fellow students!

    The exhibit was developed and curated by Joseph Orzynski (current CU Anthro undergrad) and Kerrie Iyoob (former  CU Anthro undergrad, now Museum and Field Studies graduate student).

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations is hosting an Undergraduate Open House next Tuesday, September 23rd. From 1:00-2:00, students are invited to learn more about their Majors and Minors, as well as their Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language courses. From 2:00-3:00, students can learn more about their Certificates, along with their Arabic, Farsi, and Hindi-Urdu classes. Faculty and Advisors will be available to meet students in a relaxed atmosphere, and students can drop-in to the Open House they are interested in anytime during the event. Detailed information about our Programs and Courses is available on their website (alc.colorado.edu).

    Undergraduate Open House

     

    Undergraduate Open House

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Professor Yoshikazu Kawaguchi will address fundamental issues in effective Japanese language teaching, including such aspects as teaching Japanese phonetics, teaching kanji, and engaging students in communication.  Professor Kawaguchi is widely published and has offered lectures and workshops world-wide. He is acclaimed for his research on aspects of politeness in Japanese and his contributions to communicative pedagogy, to making students autonomous learners, and to incorporating dramatic activities into language education.

    This presentation will be held in Japanese.

    Yoshikazu Kawaguchi is Professor Emeritus of Japanese at Waseda University.

    After the lecture, there will be a reception in Humanities 230.

    The Basis of Japanese Pedagogy


    Map of Humanities

  • [CAS Event] Join the Center for Asian Studies for an informal Meet & Greet. Enjoy coffee and scones while meeting other students and CU affiliates from across campus who are interested in Asia. Also find out more about the Asian Studies major and minor as well as the many Asia-related activities we have going on this year!

    Drip coffee and scones will be provided by the Center for Asian Studies. Participants can purchase additional food or drinks.

    Asian Studies Meet & Greet

  • [CAS Event] Join Susan Schmidt of the American Association of Teachers of Japanese (AATJ) to find out more about the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) and the Bridging Project Scholarship program. The Bridging Project is a program that offers scholarships to American undergraduate students participating in study-abroad programs in Japan. The JLPT is an internationally-recognized test for Japanese language proficiency, and this year, CU-Boulder is a host site for the JLPT.

    The JLPT registration deadline is Friday, October 3, and the test will be held on Sunday, December 7. The Bridging Scholarship Spring 2015 deadline is Wednesday, October 8.

    To find out more about both of these programs, please visit the AATJ website.


    Studying Japanese?


    Center for Asian Studies

  • [Non-CAS Event] Part of the DocuWest International Film Festival. Meet the Patels is a laugh-out-loud real life romantic comedy about Ravi Patel, an almost-30-year-old Indian-American who enters a love triangle between the woman of his dreams ... and his parents. Filmed by Ravi's sister in what started as a family vacation video, this hilarious and heartbreaking film reveals how love is a family affair. The screening will begin at 2:15.

    There will also be an opportunity to speak with Directors Geeta and Ravi Patel after the screening.

    Click here to purchase your tickets.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Are Indian women seen as passive victims or agents of change? Please join this roundtable discussion of professors and students for a lively conversation on how Indian women are represented (or misrepresented) in Western media as we discuss popular perceptions and stereotypes.

    Faculty Participants:

    Rashna Singh: "The mark of the plural" in American media coverage of Indian women
    In a Ted talk, Nigerian author Chimamanda Adichie warns of the danger of telling a single story. Reportage of the brutal gang rape that took place in Delhi at the end of 2012 has often been told as a single story in the United States, one of Indian women as submissive and passive victims always in danger from misogynistic, predatory men. Their agency is denied, and narratives of resistance are neglected. In that erasure many strong, confident and courageous Indian women are effaced. In talking about Indian women, American media often use what Albert Memmi called “the mark of the plural,” generalizing, essentializing and speaking in monolithic terms. Indian women are not carved out of a single block of stone, yet The New York Times refers to how “India treats its women and girls.” Not all Indian women have access to media, of course, and not all can make their voices heard. But in the end Indian women must speak for themselves, save themselves, rescue themselves and represent themselves. Many are already doing that, but their stories are not being told or heard. I will discuss the aetiology of media coverage of the infamous Delhi gang rape and its larger implications.

    Purvi Metha: Historicizing predominant themes and tropes in media coverage
    I will historicize and analyze the predominant themes and tropes that appeared in American media coverage of the 2012 Delhi rape case and subsequent high profile rapes in India. I will discuss the consistent casting of Indian women as victims of a patriarchal and degenerate culture, and the media’s focus on an apparent “rape culture” in India rather than on the vibrant and robust feminist activism that followed the 2012 rape. After highlighting the resurrection of colonial discourses with regard to gender in these media accounts, I will conclude by calling attention to the consequences of these representations in terms of activism against sexual violence here in the U.S.

    Aditi Mitra: The social agency of Indian women
    Women in India have made progress in terms of representation and participation in the public sphere. Though the progress has not been linear, strides have been made. Unfortunately, not much light has been shed on their socio-political accomplishments and increasing visibility in human rights activism. Coverage of events and activism is selective and does not comprise the whole picture. I will talk about women in India who are bringing about social change, either as activists in non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or as elected governmental representatives. I will use specific examples of Indian women who are proactive in their own change and then move to discuss the social agency of women in NGOs in India. My talk will include short video clips.

    Student Participant:

    Krithika Vachali: Contesting identities as a female Indian college student in the United States
    I focus on the lived experience of being a female Indian college student in the United States. As a student at Colorado College, I occupy a space where stereotypes are less likely to follow me, but not a space entirely devoid of stereotypes. The way that members of the college community, both peers and others, have related to me before and after the 2012 Delhi gang rape has been markedly different, and it is largely due to the perceived identity of the Indian woman that they construct from media sources. In order to assert my own identity, I have to go up against the one constructed for me and question the ways in which these constructions both valorise me and make me a victim. In order for me to relate to the people around me, and represent where I come from, it is important for me to have my own voice, a voice that Western media representations often take away from an Indian woman.

     

    Parking is available at Euclid AutoPark at Broadway and Euclid (hourly rate). For more information about parking, please click here.


    Preferably Unheard


    Map of Hale

  • [Non-CAS Event] This is a daylong conference at the University of Denver. From 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., there will be panel discussions in Special Events Room in Anderson Academic Commons on the following topics: "The Role of the Muslim Brotherhood," "Islamism, Liberalism & Democratic Theory," and "Ideology, Mass Media, Popular Culture & the Public Sphere." Then from 7:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m., there will be a screening of the film The Square and a discussion in the Reiman Theater in the Margery Reed Building.

    For more information, please visit bit.ly/cmes-egypt-conf.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] Caste, a social-economic-cultural-religious construction has ruled the Indian minds for over three thousand years and have gradually been institutionalized. Caste continues to serve as the fabric of Indian society, co-existing with modernity and a profound and progressive legal framework. Often the differences in approach to address the issue have become contentious. Martin Macwan, founder of Navsarjan Trust (www.navsarjan.org), the prominent indian organization and many other institutions in India, tells the story of how he and his colleagues have been successfully able to dissolve the caste discrimination, a blot on the global civil society.


    Map of CAS

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Talk featuring Consul General Dong Man Han, of the Consulate of the Republic of Korea in San Francisco. Consul General Han will discuss the current state of the Korean peninsula, including South Korean economic development, its relationship with North Korea and the United States, and finally, the popularity of Korean culture worldwide.

    Han Dong-man has been serving as Consul General of the Republic of Korea since May 2013. Consul General Han received his Bachelor's at Yonsei University in Korea and his Master's in International Organization Law at the Pantheon-Sorbonne University in Paris, France. He joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1985 and has held Secretary posts in Algeria, the United Kingdom, and Australia as well as in the Office of the President in Korea. In 2002, he served as the Director of the Security Policy Division at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and as Consul at the Korean Consulate General in New York. He also served as the Minister-Counsellor at the Korean Embassy in Washington, D.C. Prior to his post in San Francisco, he served as the Director-General of the International Economic Affairs Bureau of the Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs (2011 – 2013). Consul General Han received the Order of the Service Medal in 2012 and he has written four books, including The Next 10 Years of Korea (ISBN 9788959753666), an insightful look at the future of Korea on the international stage for the next decade to come. He is married and has two sons.

    Parking is available at Euclid AutoPark at Broadway and Euclid (hourly rate), or in Lot 380 ($4 after 5pm), which can be accessed by turning east on University (do not turn left down the hill, but keep following University east towards the campus. Lot 380 is next to the Recreation Center and across the street from the library. For more information about parking, please click here.

    Korea Now

    Map of Humanities

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] In eastern Tibet, along the border of Kham and Golok, Tibetan nomads are starting to wear a new amulet, called an "amulet for peace" (zhi bde rtags ma), depicting a globe with a dove flying above it. The dove carries a bodhi leaf in its mouth and a gold peace sign in its claws. While combining global and Buddhist symbols for peace, the amulet and its accompanying slogan, "Friends, let's create harmonious relations together" (Grogs po lags nga tsho mnyam du mthun 'brel byed), are not being marshalled for Gandhian-style non-violent resistance nor world peace for that matter, but rather for something more local. This local cause is a campaign to end fighting over the grasslands, a sustained social problem in Tibetan nomadic areas since the pastoral sector was decollectivized, which Emily Yeh (2003) and others have called attention to. The amulet for peace is a recent innovation, launched in 2012, as part of an ethical reform movement being propagated by Larung Buddhist Academy, the largest monastic institution on the Tibetan plateau, and spreading from its base in Serta to surrounding areas. This brown bag presentation by Professor Padmatso of Southwest Nationalities University and Holly Gayley of CU-Boulder discusses the latest development in this emerging movement that draws on Buddhist ethics to address current social problems. 

     


    Non-Violence as a Shifting Signifier on the Tibetan Plateau

  • [Non-CAS Event] JET Alums in the Rocky Mountain Region and the Japan-America Society of Colorado present "Live Your Dream: The Taylot Anderson Story." As you may know, Taylor Anderson was on the JET program teaching children English when she lost her life in the great tsunami / earthquake of Japan on March 11, 2011. The film Live Your Dream is a story about Taylor Anderson and all the young people who travel the world trying to make a difference.

    The price is $25 per person and includes the film screening, dinner, tax, and gratuity. For more information and to purchase your tickets, visit http://jetaarockymountain.org/2014/07/live-your-dream/ or contact treasurer@jetaarockymountain.org.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Celebrate with the Denver-Takayama Sister Cities committee as they celebrate the opening of the exhibit Norihito's Kiri-e. Kiri-e is the Japanese tradition of detailed artwork made of paper cutting into often intricate designs. Norihito Yoshimoto's work captures the beauty of Hida-Takayama and the gentle spirit of Japan.

    For more information, please contact 720-865-1821.

  • [Non-CAS Event] It's destination Asia and Pacific Islands! Experience live performances, enjoy tasting many different foods, learn more about arts and culture of Asia and the Pacific Islands! This is a family friendly event that is open & free to the public.

    This festival showcases arts, crafts, food, music, and performances from various local Asian and Pacific Island communities and is held on the world famous Pearl Street Mall in downtown Boulder, Colorado. The festival highlights thriving Asian culture in the Denver/Boulder areas and attracts thousands of attendees each year.

    There will be an array of delicacies from Vietnam, Japan, Nepal, and China will delight your taste buds.  Savor dumplings, steamed buns, samosas, Vietnamese eggrolls, noodle bowls and Asian desserts available from various vendors throughout the festival.

    The traditional Lion dance will be performed on both Saturday and Sunday by Boulder’s own Shaolin Hung Mei Kung Fu Association.  Festival favorite, Wendy Woo will perform on Saturday at 1pm.

    This event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://www.boulderdowntown.com/do/boulder-asian-festival3.

  • [Non-CAS Event] It's destination Asia and Pacific Islands! Experience live performances, enjoy tasting many different foods, learn more about arts and culture of Asia and the Pacific Islands! This is a family friendly event that is open & free to the public.

    This festival showcases arts, crafts, food, music, and performances from various local Asian and Pacific Island communities and is held on the world famous Pearl Street Mall in downtown Boulder, Colorado. The festival highlights thriving Asian culture in the Denver/Boulder areas and attracts thousands of attendees each year.

    There will be an array of delicacies from Vietnam, Japan, Nepal, and China will delight your taste buds.  Savor dumplings, steamed buns, samosas, Vietnamese eggrolls, noodle bowls and Asian desserts available from various vendors throughout the festival.

    The traditional Lion dance will be performed on both Saturday and Sunday by Boulder’s own Shaolin Hung Mei Kung Fu Association.  Festival favorite, Wendy Woo will perform on Saturday at 1pm.

    This event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://www.boulderdowntown.com/do/boulder-asian-festival3.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Denver Takayama Sister City Committee and Denver Sister Cities International, along with the Japan America Society of Colorado, the Japan Foundation, and City and County of Denver, are hosting the first annual Japanese Kite Festival, a two-day event that is part of the Denver Days celebrations. 

    On Tuesday, August 5, there will be two kite-making workshops let by Edo kite master Mikio Toki and Colorado Springs-based artist Scott Skinner. The cost is $5 for the materials to make your own Japanese kite.

    The times for the kite-making workshops are 9:00-11:00 a.m. and 1:00-3:00 p.m. Registration is required for the workshops. For questions and to register, visit www.jascolorado.org, or call 303-592-5364.

    On Wednesday, August 6, there will be a kite flying festival, also led by Mikio Toki and Scott Skinner. There will be a lecture and demonstration from noon until 1:00 p.m. All are welcome. You may bring your own kite of any kind. There is no charge for the kite flying festival. Please bring your own picnic.

    For more information, please visit www.jascolorado.org, call 303-592-5364, or write to info@jascolorado.org.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Denver Takayama Sister City Committee and Denver Sister Cities International, along with the Japan America Society of Colorado, the Japan Foundation, and City and County of Denver, are hosting the first annual Japanese Kite Festival, a two-day event that is part of the Denver Days celebrations. 

    On Tuesday, August 5, there will be two kite-making workshops let by Edo kite master Mikio Toki and Colorado Springs-based artist Scott Skinner. The cost is $5 for the materials to make your own Japanese kite.

    The times for the kite-making workshops are 9:00-11:00 a.m. and 1:00-3:00 p.m. Registration is required for the workshops. For questions and to register, visit www.jascolorado.org, or call 303-592-5364.

    On Wednesday, August 6, there will be a kite flying festival, also led by Mikio Toki and Scott Skinner. There will be a lecture and demonstration from noon until 1:00 p.m. All are welcome. You may bring your own kite of any kind. There is no charge for the kite flying festival. Please bring your own picnic.

    For more information, please visit www.jascolorado.org, call 303-592-5364, or write to info@jascolorado.org.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Japanese American Association of Colorado is happy to celebrate the 28th Anniversary of the Yamagata-Colorado Sister State Association. There will be children's games by the Colorado Japanese School, raffles, and door prizes. Additionally, they are honored to have a performance by  the Yamagata Dancers.

    The picnic will go from 11:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. For more information, contact Kent Kuroda at 303-514-5353.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Joseph Cirincione is president of Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation. He is the author of the new book Nuclear Nightmares: Securing the World Before It Is Too Late, Bomb Scare: The History and Future of Nuclear Weapons and Deadly Arsenals: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Threats. He is a member of Secretary of State John Kerry's International Security Advisory Board and the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Cirincione worked for nine years in the U.S. House of Representatives on the professional staff of the Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on Government Operations. He is the author of hundreds of articles on nuclear weapons issues, the producer of two DVDs, a frequent commentator in the media, and he appeared in the films, Countdown to Zero and Why We Fight. He previously served as Vice President for National Security and International Policy at the Center for American Progress and Director for Nonproliferation at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He has held positions at the Henry L. Stimson Center, the U.S. Information Agency and the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He teaches at the graduate School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

    5:30 p.m. - Networking / Hors D'ouevres / Book Selling

    6:00-7:30 p.m. - Talk and Q&A

    7:30 p.m. - Book Signing & Sales

    $29 for WorldDenver Members, $39 for non-members

    Please register here by Friday, July 11.

    For more information, please click here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Born in Calcutta (Kolkata), India, Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) was a vital force in the art, literature and music of his country.  He was a poet, novelist, playwright, composer, philosopher and painter.  He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913 and established Visva-Bharati University at Santiniketan, West Bengal, in 1921.  Tagore traveled extensively and visited more than thirty countries on five continents.  He was captivated with what he saw during his trips to the Americas, Asia and Europe, and began painting and drawing at age sixty.  He found inspiration from various sources, including Haida carvings from British Columbia and woodcuts by German artist Max Pechstein.  In her lecture, Sharmila Roy Pommot discusses Tagore's astonishing accomplishments as writer, musician and artist.

    Sharmila Roy Pommot grew up at Visva-Bharati, the university founded by Rabindranath Tagore, where she experienced his music, poetry, dance, dramas and philosophy as part of everyday life.  She received a degree in English from Calcutta University and one in graphic arts from Visva-Bharati.  She studied Tagore's songs and classical Indian music and went to Paris in 1975 on an art scholarship from the French government, and did her doctoral work at the Paris-Sorbonne University.  She has a beautifully evocative voice, and her singing has enriched the films of Satyajit Ray, Nacer Khemir and Peter Brooks.  She adapted and directed several of Tagore's dance dramas in French, wrote French subtitles for Satyajit Ray's films, participated in several documentaries, and published in Postif (a French cinema journal).  She teaches musicology at L'INALCO (Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales) at the Sorbonne and was a scholar in residence at Visva-Bharati from January through May 2014.

    This event is free for all. For reservations or more information, contact Dariya Bryant at 720-913-0040 or dbryant@denverartmuseum.org.

  • [Non-CAS Event] AID (the Association for India's Development) is a nationwide nonprofit organization that works to fund and support grassroots projects that tackle a wide number of concerns in India. These issues range from energy and water to human rights and women's empowerment. Our support of these projects goes beyond the surface fiscal level, however. Projects supported by AID are regularly audited, so that we can achieve the maximum amount of positive impact.

    The AID annual conference is this weekend (May, 24-25, 2014) on the CU campus.

    This event features many fascinating discussions, presentations, and interactive sessions. The theme of the conference this year is "Women's Empowerment," but the topics range from human rights to more effective ways to fund development. Most of the speakers are grass-root level workers from India who can talk about their first hand experience in these topics. The conference is free for CU students, faculty and associates, and it offers a unique opportunity for people interested in development, people's issues and India. Most of the sessions allow ample time for audience questions and interaction with panelists and speakers.

    Registration can be completed by following this link: http://conference.aidindia.org. This is only for logistics, and there will be no charges for attending the sessions/panels.

    The conference is Saturday May 24 and Sunday May 25, and goes from 9 am-7 pm. It will be held in the ATLAS building, with most of the main sessions in ATLAS 100. Participants are welcome to attend one or multiple sessions, or the whole day.

    Questions? Please email aid@colorado.edu for questions related to the Conference.

  • [Non-CAS Event] AID (the Association for India's Development) is a nationwide nonprofit organization that works to fund and support grassroots projects that tackle a wide number of concerns in India. These issues range from energy and water to human rights and women's empowerment. Our support of these projects goes beyond the surface fiscal level, however. Projects supported by AID are regularly audited, so that we can achieve the maximum amount of positive impact.

    The AID annual conference is this weekend (May, 24-25, 2014) on the CU campus.

    This event features many fascinating discussions, presentations, and interactive sessions. The theme of the conference this year is "Women's Empowerment," but the topics range from human rights to more effective ways to fund development. Most of the speakers are grass-root level workers from India who can talk about their first hand experience in these topics. The conference is free for CU students, faculty and associates, and it offers a unique opportunity for people interested in development, people's issues and India. Most of the sessions allow ample time for audience questions and interaction with panelists and speakers.

    Registration can be completed by following this link: http://conference.aidindia.org. This is only for logistics, and there will be no charges for attending the sessions/panels.

    The conference is Saturday May 24 and Sunday May 25, and goes from 9 am-7 pm. It will be held in the ATLAS building, with most of the main sessions in ATLAS 100. Participants are welcome to attend one or multiple sessions, or the whole day.

    Questions? Please email aid@colorado.edu for questions related to the Conference.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Louisa Lim, Beijing correspondent for NPR and the BBC, will discuss her new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited, on May 20 from 5:30-7:00 pm in Ben Cherrington Hall, Sie 150.

    Lim opened NPR's Shanghai bureau in February 2006, but she's reported for NPR from up Tibetan glaciers and down the shaft of a Shaanxi coalmine. She made a very rare reporting trip to North Korea, covered illegal abortions in Guangxi province, and worked on the major multimedia series on religion in China "New Believers: A Religious Revolution in China." Lim has been part of NPR teams with multiple awards, including the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award, a Peabody and two Edward R. Murrow awards, for their coverage of the Sichuan earthquake in 2008 and the Beijing Olympics. She's been honored in the Human Rights Press Awards, as well as winning prizes for her multimedia work.
    More information and registration can be found at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/forums

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Dana Lewis at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao directly at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [Non-CAS Event] In the world of Asian art history, the Himalayan nation of Bhutan is comparatively understudied and often misrepresented as a minor offshoot of its better known neighbors, Tibet, Nepal and India. This talk draws upon the research and experiences of Ariana Maki, associate curator of Asian art at the CU Art Museum, while studying Bhutanese art in situ since 2007, and seeks to demonstrate some of its unique stylistic characteristics as well as its uses in rituals and everyday life. In addition, we’ll explore how art objects are used to define and sustain identity in Bhutan at the local and national levels.

    Doors open at 11:30 a.m.

    Tickets for lecture only: free for Asian Art Association members, $7 for DAM members, $5 for teachers and students, $10 for other. Museum admission not necessary unless touring galleries; DAM members please check in.

    Sponsored by the Asian Art Association, a DAM support group.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This half-day conference will be held from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm in Sie 150 of Ben Cherrington Hall. We have lined up a group of top scholars from the US, UK, and China to present their research and engage in conversations. More information, including an agenda and discussant bios, can be found on the website at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/conferences.html.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This film screening features the work of CSU-Pueblo students who prepared short documentaries inspired by the Chairman Mao Archival Collection at the CSU-Pueblo library. The screening should last for approximately one hour.

    The archive is a collection of "Maomorabilia" accumulated by Dr. Bea Spade during her trips to China. This collection was donated to the CSU-Pueblo library in 2012.

    For more information, please contact Dr. Brigid Vance at brigid.vance@colostate-pueblo.edu.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This is a workshop with Ming Franz. It will be May 2-4, from 10 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. The cost is $275 for AAA members, $300 for DAM members, and $325 for all others. There is also a $30 materials fee paid. No painting experience necessary. 

    Reservations required, and there is a $50 non-refundable fee.  For reservations and further details, please contact blittle@denverartmuseum.org or call 720-913-0040.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] Dennis McGilvray, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, will discuss his recent research in Sri Lanka. The century-old Muslim shrine at Daftar Jailani, located on the southern escarpment of the Kandyan Hills in central Sri Lanka, celebrates an annual flag-raising and kandoori (urs) festival in memory of the popular Sufi saint Abd al-Qadir Jilani (1077-1166 C.E., buried in Baghdad), who is believed to have meditated for twelve years in a cave overlooking the jungles below. Recently, the shrine has become the target of militant Sinhala Buddhist monks who wish to reclaim the site as an ancient 5th century BCE monastic center. In 2013 a successful campaign to assert Buddhist control over Jailani was waged by monks of an anti-Muslim organization called the Bodu Bala Sena (Buddhist Strength Force) supported by the current Sri Lankan Defense Minister and the Sri Lankan Archaeology Department. The most recent celebration of the Jailani festival in February 2014 reveals the extent to which Sinhala Buddhist ethno-nationalism and anti-Muslim activism is affecting this traditional site of Sri Lankan Sufi devotion.

     

  • [Non-CAS Event] Jongjoo Lee, Unification and Security Attaché at the Korean Embassy in D.C., will join Dean Hill and Professor Zhao, on April 29 from 5:00-6:30 pm in Ben Cherrington Hall, Sie 150 for a panel discussion on  “How to Handle the North Korean Crises: Perspectives from the ROK, US and China.”

    Panelists will address the North Korean situation and offer their perspectives and opinions on the role the Republic of Korea, the U.S. and China can play in the conflict.

    Jongjoo Lee is currently Unification and Security Attaché at the Korean Embassy in D.C. Dispatched from the Ministry of Unification (MOU), her major focus here is to engage with U.S. policy community regarding North Korea issues, sharing information and analysis with and seeking policy recommendation from the community.

    More information and registration can be found at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/events/forums.

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Ms. Dana Lewis at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao directly at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This exhibit will be on display from March 1 until April 27 at RedLine. Curated by Julie Segraves.

    Born in Beijing in 1980, Chen Man is young Chinese photographer known for her strong aesthetic eye and outstanding photography skills. Using computerized 3-D rendering techniques, Chen Man creates evocative images that feature women and document their place in contemporary Chinese society.

    Chen Man fuses her superb interpretation of the female form with an active artistic imagination as she mixes visual elements from China’s past with features of contemporary art and culture. Her work combines outstanding photography with innovative new-media skills, and the results are evocative, painterly images that reflect the continuing evolution of China’s youth society. A New Attitude will be Chen Man’s first solo exhibition in the United States.

    A New Attitude is part of the 2014 exhibition series titled She Crossed the Line, presented by RBC Wealth Management and RedLine. For more information, please click here.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Timothy Weston, Associate Professor of History and the Associate Director of the Center for Asian Studies, will give a talk on his current research entitled "When the Reporter is the Story: Executing Journalists in Early Republican China."

    Professor Weston will be presenting a draft of a partial chapter from his book project on journalists, journalism, and representations of society’s voice in early Republican China.  This portion focuses on press discourse about the summary execution (by warlords) of two journalists, Shao Piaoping and Lin Baishui, in 1926.

    If you would like to read a draft of the paper prior to the seminar, please contact Mithi Mukherjee at Mithi.Mukherjee@Colorado.EDU.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Although long valued as the fifth of the five normative social relations in Confucian discourse, friendship in traditional China has only recently begun to be studied for its broader cultural significance in Chinese history. In her talk, Anna Shields, Associate Professor of Chinese at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, explores the impact of elite male friendship on the literary culture of the mid-Tang period (780s–820s), an era of great social and cultural change and the beginning of the epochal Tang-Song transition. Friendships with fellow literati provided mid-Tang men with social capital, intellectual stimulation, and sites for literary exchange. More profoundly, some of the most influential mid-Tang writers—men such as Han Yu, Bai Juyi, and Yuan Zhen—also saw friendship as bridging the public and private spheres: choosing friends and celebrating them in writing became an important way for literati to publicize their intellectual commitments and even their moral values. Drawing from her book “One Who Knows Me”: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid- Tang China (Harvard Asia Center, 2015), Shields focuses on images of the “body” of the friend in mid-Tang poems, letters, and funerary texts, in particular examining the use of metonymy in representations of absent friends. By invoking friends metonymically—through boxes of letters, gifts of poems, the remembered sound of a voice—mid- Tang writers were able to capture the intimacy and emotional weight of their friendships without conventional sentimentality. Through this and other innovative approaches to portraying friendship, mid-Tang writers forever broadened the scope of experiences appropriate to literary writing and brought private life into greater public view.

    Body of the Friend

    Map of Humanities

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Fulbright program is the U.S. government’s flagship program for international educational exchange, and CU-Boulder is a top producing campus for U.S. Student Fulbright grants. Come to an information meeting to learn how you can apply for a Fulbright grant to do overseas study/research or to be an English teaching assistant overseas. These grants are for U.S. citizens who will have at least a bachelor's degree at the time the grant starts and who won’t have completed a PhD by the Fulbright application deadline.  The CU-Boulder student deadline for applying for a 2015-2016 U.S. Student Fulbright Grant is Sept. 8, 2014.

    More information at http://www.colorado.edu/oie/finances-scholarships-and-fellowships/us-student-fulbright-opportunities, or by email: oie@colorado.edu.

  • [CAS Speaker Series] A panel discussion in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protest and June 4th crackdown. Featuring Chris Hammons (Anthropology), and Tim Oakes (Geography), Tim Weston (History).

    Tiananmen Retrospective

    Map of Humanities

     

  • [Non-CAS Event] Graduating next year? Got plans for the summer? Now is an excellent time to start your Peace Corps application. Learn more at the Peace Corps info. session on Tuesday, April 22, 6 - 7: 30 p.m. in Hellems 267.

    In addition to breaking down the application process and benefits of Peace Corps service, we'll have guest returned Peace Corps volunteer Therese Glowacki share her pictures and stories of service. Glowacki works at the Boulder County Parks and Open Space resource management office. She was an agroforestry Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal, worked as an environmental specialist for Peace Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C., and was the associate Peace Corps director for the Madagascar environmental program.

    We know you'll be hungry from studying for finals so there will be free pizza too. Learn more about Peace Corps' Earth Day activitiesEnvironmental programs, and Agriculture programs.

  • [Non-CAS Event] Laura Lane, President of Global Public Affairs at UPS, will be the Jackson/Ho China Forum speaker on Thursday, April 17, from 5:00-6:30 pm in room 290 of Anderson Academic Commons. She will discuss “The China-US Economic Relationship: Perspectives from Government and Business.”

    Prior to joining UPS, Laura was Managing Director and Head of International Government Affairs at CitiGroup and VP for Global Public Policy with Time Warner. In her government career, Ms. Lane was responsible for bilateral trade affairs with the Middle Eastern and Mediterranean countries at the United States Trade Representative (USTR). She also negotiated market access commitments on trade in services with China as part of its accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) and served as U.S. negotiator for the WTO Financial Services negotiations, which resulted in a first-ever global agreement in 1997.

    Please RSVP online at http://www.du.edu/korbel/china/forums/lane.html no later than April 16.

    If you have any questions about other CCUSC programs, please contact Ms. Dana Lewis at 303-871-4474 or ccusc@du.edu.  You may also contact Suisheng (Sam) Zhao, the Director of CCUSC, directly at szhao@du.edu or 303.871.2401.

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] This Luncheon Series talk will be given by Ariana Maki, Associate Curator of Asian Art at CU-Boulder.

    How did Bhutanese Buddhist masters use art and imagery to support their claims to legitimacy?  In what ways did (and do) mural programs contribute to a viewer’s understanding of ritual practices, local and regional identities, and religious authority? Based on field research in Bhutan, this talk will briefly explore the iconographic programs of a few key sites in Bhutan, highlighting the ways in which paintings of particular practices, deities, and historical figures made clear and deliberate claims to power, lineage and legitimacy both within Himalayan Buddhist religious traditions and the larger socio-political context.

    CAS Luncheon Series Spring 2014

  • [Non-CAS Event] Sip authentic Persian tea as you enjoy Persian-influenced music, poetry, and presentations by students from the Persian language program at the Asian Languages and Civilizations Department.

    Persian Cultural Night

  • [Non-CAS Event] The history of art reflects the evolution of human consciousness. Prehistoric cave paintings and figurines show the consciousness of the people who were wishing to invoke power and certain qualities of nature in order to imbue themselves with such power and qualities. One can observe the similar invocation and the embodiment (imbuement) in the art/artifacts of Jomon (??) era (14,500BC to about 300BC) in Japan. The art of Jomon culture is filled with powerful imagination and fantasy, no less imaginative than its contemporary counterparts in the west. Well known teacher and artist Hikaru Hirata-Miyakawa will also share how this prehistoric Japanese culture has been influencing his art.

    This event is free for AAA members, $5 for teachers and students, and $10 for all others. Reservations are recommended. Please, click here for tickets.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Distinguished Speakers Board is excited to bring former U.S. Ambassador to China and former Governor of Utah, Jon Huntsman Jr, to campus on Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Mr. Huntsman will be speaking at Macky Auditorium; the event will start at 7:30pm, with doors to the venue opening at 6:45pm. The event will include a lecture from Mr. Huntsman titled, “China: Opportunities and Challenges,” which will be followed by a question and answer session with members of the audience.

    Jon Huntsman Jr’s breadth of experience in Asia makes him one of the most knowledgeable American politicians on the region. Huntsman’s public service career began as a White House staff assistant to President Ronald Reagan and has since included appointments as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Asia, U.S. Ambassador to Singapore and Deputy U.S. Trade Representative. As a U.S. Trade Ambassador, Huntsman negotiated dozens of free trade agreements, investment framework agreements, and other bi-lateral and multi-lateral trade agreements for the United States. Prior to serving as Ambassador to China, Huntsman was twice elected Governor of Utah, including in 2008 with a record percentage of the vote and a majority in all 29 counties. As Governor, Huntsman governed with his eye toward maintaining Utah’s unparalleled quality of life, increasing the state’s economic competitiveness, and maximizing funding to Utah’s public education system.

    Tickets for the event are $2.00 for CU-Boulder student with a valid student ID and $12.00. Student tickets can be purchased from DSB table on the first floor of the University Memorial Center, Monday through Friday between 10:00am and 3:00pm. Community tickets can be purchased here

    For more information about the event visit www.facebook.com/cudsb or www.cudsb.org.

    Jon Huntsman Comes to CU

  • [Non-CAS Event] The 24th annual CU International Festival is coming this weekend! Happening this Saturday, April 12th, from 4 pm to 10 pm in the UMC Glenn Miller Ballroom. This festival features dozens of exhibits, performances, music, and food samples from around the world. The event is free and open to the public, and is sponsored by a handful of CU organizations including the Cultural Events Board. 

    2014 International Festival

  • [CAS Speaker Series] The ALC Language Night features student performances from various Asian language courses at CU. There will be Asian food and festivals, languages, media and culture, dance and music, skits, and more. The featured languages are Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, Hindi-Urdu, Japanese, and Korean. The performances will be from 5:00 until 7:30 p.m. in Humanities 1B50, and there will be a reception at 7:30 p.m. in the Humanities first floor lobby.

    This event is free and open to the public. Everyone is welcome to attend!

    ALC Language Night

  • [CAS Speaker Series] It's one thing to learn to read with an alphabet that has 26 letters. It's something else to entirely master an alphabet with 2,600+ different letters, or "kanji." Once you master the basic principle of ideographic writing, anyone can start reading the kanji. This lecture explains the concept of ideogram and then moves rapidly through most important kanji used in both Chinese and Japanese writing. Mr. Reid guarantees that those who pay close attention will be able to read Japanese and Chinese by the end of the lesson.

    Mr. T.R. Reid served as President of the Japan America Society of Colorado from 2011-2013. He is a longtime correspondent for The Washington Post, former Chief of its Tokyo and London bureaus, and a commentator for National Public Radio. Mr. Reid is also the acclaimed author of Ski JapanThe United States of EuropeThe Chip, and Confucius Lives Next Door.

    Learn to Read Japanese

    Map of Hale

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Asia has been the site of some of the greatest human and natural catastrophes.  From the 2011 earthquake and nuclear meltdown in Japan, to the 1984 Union Carbide disaster in Bhopal, India, to the legacy of Soviet nuclear testing in Kazakhstan, to the ever-present risk of nuclear war in South Asia, Asian sites reveal much about the intersection of the political and the natural.   The Center for Asian Studies will host four presentations by  scholars on the risks, costs and effects of different types and contexts of disaster in a day-long symposium on April 4, 2014.  Please join us.

    1:00 p.m. "Radiation 'Adaptation': Emergent Subjectivities and Health Strategies Among Indigenous Kazakhs at Semipalatinsk," Magdalena Stawkowski, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado Boulder

    In this paper, I draw on sixteen months of field work to describe the legacies of the Soviet atomic testing project and its long-term disastrous effects on the inhabitants of the nuclear zone in Kazakhstan.  Focusing on the village of Koyan in the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site region, I examine local Indigenous Kazakh villager’s understandings of health, livelihood and suffering, specifically their emerging subjectivities and health strategies after forty years of Soviet nuclear testing. While rooted in the broader histories of the Kazakh steppe and subsequent decline of the Soviet state, the context for this discussion is a forty-year period of Cold War nuclear testing and then its programmatic and abrupt closure. Particularly, I elucidate how scientific authority about the biological effects of low-dose radiation exposure, coupled with Kazakhstan’s economic restructuring programs, led to the socio-economic marginalization of inhabitants living adjacent to the test site. Principally, I address how Kazakhstan’s current political-economic climate has fostered a specific post-socialist “mutant” subjectivity in the nuclear zone—one that has rural populations “embracing” radioactive pollution. Tragically, the people I came to know see their own survival as proof that they are biologically adapted to a radioactive ecosystem.

    1:40 p.m. "Recovery and Lessons Learned from Fukushima Dai-ichi," Jerry Peterson, Professor, Department of Physics, University of Colorado Boulder

    One of the many dire problems resulting from the March 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake was the loss of cooling water to three operating nuclear power reactors at TEPCO’s Fukushima Dai-ichi plant.  Without the cooling, residual radioactive heating began to melt some of the components within the containment vessel.  Radioactive material was released from these components, and some left the plant in the air, ground water, and sea water, with wide media coverage.  Although the reactor safety systems themselves worked as designed, the entire system was overwhelmed by the quake and tsunami.  This system, we now realize, included a wide range of regulatory, corporate, public information, and other social, economic and political ingredients.  This accident has been called “a new type of nuclear disaster found at the interface of both social and natural phenomena”.  With nuclear fission providing 11% of global electricity, we must learn how to prevent, plan for, and deal with future incidents, within a much wider range of responsibilities.

    2:20 p.m. "Catastrophic 'Experiments' and Corporeal Categories: Bhopal Gas Victims as 'Special' Citizens," Bridget Hanna, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

    The Bhopal Disaster – the 1984 gas leak from an American-owned chemical plant into a densely populated central Indian city – was paradigmatic event of the risk society. Not only was it a novel and unique catastrophe: it was also a massive, uncontrolled, and largely undocumented experiment, one conducted with neither a protocol nor a control, on a sleeping city. What unfolded initially as the accidental exposure of 500,000 people to an unknown combination of deadly gases, has become over time (for those who have survived) an ongoing struggle for cure in the face of an ill that experts have still not fully defined. Rather, extant notions of treatment, illness, and exposure have been retrofit to Bhopal with mixed results, in an ongoing attempt to respond to, or perhaps neutralize, the suffering of the victims. Today, debates over detoxification, chronicity, stigma, categorization, and even clinical trials, are continuing to play out over the bodies of the gas-affected. In this talk I describe the medical institutions and practices that have arisen to manage the relationship of the gas-exposed to their health, in order to expose how medical uncertainty and the creation of “special” categories has constrained both access to care, and hopes for healing.

    3;00 p.m. "Self-Assured Destruction: The Climate Impacts of Nuclear War," Brian Toon, Professor, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder

    Climatic Consequences and Agricultural Impact of Regional Nuclear Conflict - Brian Toon. A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, would inject smoke from the resulting fires into the stratosphere. This could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history and global-scale ozone depletion, with enhanced ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the surface. Simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), show a long stratospheric residence time for smoke and hence a long-lasting climate response, with global average surface air temperatures 1.1 K below normal and global average precipitation 4% below normal even after a decade. The erythemal dose from the enhanced UV radiation would greatly increase, in spite of enhanced absorption by the remaining smoke, with the UV index more than 3 units higher in the summer midlatitudes, even after a decade. Scenarios of changes in temperature, precipitation, and downward shortwave radiation applied to the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer crop model for winter wheat, rice, soybeans, and maize by perturbing observed time series with anomalies from the regional nuclear war simulations, produce decreases of 10-50% in yield averaged over a decade, with larger decreases in the first several years, over the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The impact of the nuclear war simulated here, using much less than 1% of the global nuclear arsenal, would be devastating to world agricultural production and trade, possibly sentencing a billion people now living marginal existences to starvation. The continued environmental threat of the use of even a small number of nuclear weapons must be considered in nuclear policy deliberations in Russia, the U.S., and the rest of the world.

    3:40 p.m. Break

    4:00 p.m. Discussion by a faculty panel of respondents

    Waleed Abdalati (Professor of Geography, CU-Boulder), Donna Goldstein (Professor of Anthropology, CU-Boulder), Laurel Rodd (Professor of Japanese, Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, CU-Boulder), and Emily Yeh (Professor of Geography, CU-Boulder); moderated by Tim Oakes (Director ofthe Center for Asian Studies and Professor of Geography, CU-Boulder)

    5:30 p.m. Reception

    The closest metered parking is along University Avenue and in Lot 381, which is at the end of University Avenue along the roundabout just before the road turns north down the hill. These are limited to two hours, however, so we suggest that you park in the Euclid Auto Park by the University Memorial Center.

    CAS Symposium 2014: Catastrophic Asia

    Map of Norlin

  • [Non-CAS Event] This event is part of the Curator's Circle Lecture Series. This event is free, but reservations are required. Contact Lea Norcross at lnorcross@denverartmuseum.org, or call 720-913-0040.

  • [Non-CAS Event] The Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations is holding the 2nd Annual Boulder Chinese Contest on April 3. There will be a reception following the contest in the Humanities Lobby. The deadline to sign up to compete is March 14. For further information, please contact chun-ling.hsu@colorado.edu.

    2nd Annual Boulder Chinese Contest

  • [CAS Luncheon Series] This event has been cancelled. This Luncheon Series talk will be given by Rachel Fleming, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology. As more Indian women enter workplaces in cities like Bangalore, especially in fields such as Information Technology, they are experiencing new dilemmas, lifestyles, and friendships that differ from previous generations. Based on several months of fieldwork in Bangalore and interviews with three generations of women, this talk presents conclusions about how women in this site understand and experience new work opportunities, gender interactions, attitudes about marriage, and changes in families, and how they come to rely on friends amidst rapid urban and social change in India.

    CAS Luncheon Series Spring 2014

  • [CAS Speaker Series] Dr. J. Kathleen Magilvy, Professor Emerita, University of Colorado College of Nursing, will provide insights on “The Growing Industry related to an Aging Population: quality of life and healthcare issues in Japan”.

    Dr. Magilvy recently retired after 39 years at the University of Colorado College of Nursing where she most recently held the position of Associate Dean for Academic Programs.  Her areas of expertise include community/public health nursing, gerontology, and qualitative research.  She earned her BSN degree in Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, her MS in Community Health Nursing at Northern Illinois University, and her PhD in Nursing from the University of Colorado. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing (FAAN).

    Professor Magilvy’s research is in community-based and long-term care for older adults and people with chronic illness and disability. She has conducted federally funded research on delivery and outcomes of rural and community health services and community analysis. An ethnographer, Professor Magilvy is interested in cross-cultural and international aging and health care. She consults internationally in these areas and in doctoral education and qualitative research. She has traveled frequently to Japan as a visiting professor and nurse scientist and enjoys learning about community health, aging, and Japanese culture. Dr. Magilvy has taught or consulted at universities such as Tokyo University, Tokyo Medical Dental University, Kobe City College of Nursing, St. Luke’s College of Nursing, Kyoto University, Oita Prefectural College of Nursing, and most recently served as a visiting professor at Yamagata Prefectural University of Nursing and Health Sciences. 

    America has much to learn from our colleagues in Japan as Japan has the fastest growing older population in the world with physical facilities that cannot keep up with the growing need for services.  We look forward to Dr. Magilvy’s insights and observations on this topic and hope that you can join us.

    The International Executive Roundtable will be held on Thursday, April 3, 2014 from 12:00 noon until 1:30 pm in the Executive MBA Auditorium, located at 1250 14th Street, Suite 150.  Box lunches will be provided.  This event is free, but please RSVP by Tuesday, April 1, 2014 to Melanie Ellison by calling 303-315-8884. 

    Co-sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and the Institute for International Business at the University of Colorado Denver.

  • [Non-CAS Event] This event is part of the Curator's Circle Lecture Series. This event is free, but reservations are required. Contact Lea Norcross at lnorcross@denverartmuseum.org, or call 720-913-0040.